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This is Page 94.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


March 7 , 2011

 

Cowboy poet Jessica Hedges lives with her husband, Sam, in a cow camp about 120 miles southwest of Ontario, Oregon. Her bio tells, "She spent most of her childhood on a cattle and hay operation in northeastern Nevada, about an hour west of Elko. It was here that she learned about the cattle, the land, and the people of the Great Basin..."

She shares some recent photos and captions:


Pigging strings in wait for a calf or cow that may need assistance. Also shown are a set of hobbles. This gear is all attached to a saddled horse who is waiting to accomplish anything necessary to quickly and safely night calve heifers.

 


The making of a calf bottle. There was a calf less than a day old that just needed a boost of extra energy while he hung out in the hot box and gained some strength. A hot box is a small heated area specifically for calves that are only a few days old.

 

This little guy is only a few days old, but already knows the routine of a bottle. He also knows that bottles come from people, so anytime a person walks by, he begins to beller, hoping he'll be fed. Unfortunately, feeding him every time he asked would not be a good thing for him.

 

Read more about Jessica Hedges here, where there are links to her web site, blog, videos, and more
 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


February 21 , 2011

 

Montana singer and songwriter Stephanie Davis reports on the happenings at her Trail's End Ranch near Columbus, Montana, with periodic Ranch News postings at her web site, www.stephaniedavis.net. The entries are filled with characters (both human and animal), history, cowboy philosophy, humor, and her always-interesting observations.

We're pleased to excerpt that news now and then for Picture the West. Below are excerpts from some recent Winter entries. 

Most photos are by Rick Philipp, noted drummer, long-suffering Trail's End ranch manager, and manager of Recluse Records.

Read all of the Trail's End Ranch News here at www.stephaniedavis.net.


 Slidin’, Glidin, Treasure Hidin’, and Resolution Abidin’


Making tracks, Daggett Canyon...
 

Plenty of snow here at Trail’s End Ranch this winter—enough to transform Daggett Canyon into a dandy cross-country ski area. Our ever-creative ranch manager, Rick, has even fashioned some adrenaline-inducing jumps along the steep hillsides. Throw in the occasional moose or mountain lion encounter, and who needs morning coffee…

Er, that would be me, though I am so far holding firm on my New Year’s Resolution of reducing consumption from one pot to one cup per day—a feat only you true fellow lifelong caffeine junkies can appreciate the magnitude of even attempting. However, if any fellow readers are thinking of following suit, I can testify that it’s actually survivable--after the first two weeks’ nausea, DTs and hallucinations, of course…

Anyway, for a major dose of peace, joy, enlightenment, perspective, stress relief, and cellulite reduction, I highly recommend strapping on a pair of skis, (any old x-country skis will do—garage sales and thrift stores are great places to find a pair) and, accompanied by at least one dog, heading down a snow-covered cow trail on a blue-sky January morning.


Nothing like a blue-sky powder morning....

 
Oops...too much looking at the scenery...

The canyon is a treasure trove for dogs. From fresh coyote scat to ancient deer hooves, each bend in the trail presents a new and exciting array of items to sniff, anoint, excavate, consume, and/or roll in.

The moment I open the gate leading to the canyon, my three Australian shepherds fan out in opposite directions. Each dog has a distinct treasure-hunting style—Ted, for example, hails from the 007 school: yesterday he appeared out of nowhere, a four-foot long deer spine perfectly balanced in his jaws. After strutting past and making sure I noticed his prize, he mysteriously disappeared into the trees. In no time, the spine vanished--undoubtedly buried deep in the snow—and Ted had trotted off in the opposite direction, pausing only occasionally for a nonchalant, shifty-eyed glance toward his treasure.


Belle Starr, on the other hand, takes a more direct approach: she races ahead and plops down smack in the middle of the trail, where she knows I will soon discover and praise her latest find. Yesterday’s was a frozen, headless rabbit, which, in typical fashion, Tillie, the ranch’s self-appointed Head Cow Dog, viewed as an opportunity to demonstrate her own treasure hunting method: “The Black Bullet Swoop-and-Swipe.” Poor Belle never saw it coming.

Here’s hoping all of you are wintering well and finding treasures of your own!
 

 


Stephanie Davis has contributed previous ranch news:

  Spring and Summer, 2009

  Winter, 2009 at Trails End

  A look back at Summer, 2009

  A June, 2009 installment of Ranch News from Trail's End

 


photo by Clark Marten

Read more about Stephanie Davis in our feature here.

Read more Ranch News here at Stephanie Davis' web site.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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