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This is Page 93.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollectionsó many with photosó contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


 

Week of February 14, 2011

 

North Dakota rancher, writer, poet and senior rodeo champion Rodney Nelson shared a photo of a North Dakota threshing crew, from the early 1900s:

 


Here are enlarged sections of the photo:
 

 

 

One member of the threshing crew was Rodney Nelson's grandfather, Ole H. Olson (shown in the third photo above, far right) :

Ole H. Olson (1872-1954) was the eighteenth governor of North Dakota, 1934-35.  The National Governors Association site here includes this information:

His education was attained at Concordia College in Moorhead, Minnesota. In 1892 he moved to Eddy County, North Dakota, where he owed and operated a successful farm. Olson first entered politics in 1916, serving as a member of the North Dakota House of Representatives, a position he held two years (1917-1919). He also served in the North Dakota State Senate from 1919 to 1931; was president pro tempore of the senate in 1929; and served as the lieutenant governor of North Dakota from 1933 to 1934.

On July 17, 1934 Governor William Langer was removed from office, and Olson, who was the lieutenant governor at the time, assumed the duties of the governorship....  After leaving office, Olson retired from politics. He continued to stay active in the Farmers Union Livestock Commission, as well as becoming involved in the Farmers Union....

Find photos and more here.

(Governor William "Wild Bill" Langer  was sentenced to prison, but he was eventually acquitted and served again as governor and as a United States senator. Read more about him here.)


 

Rodney Nelson has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West:

  Sims, North Dakota, New Year's Day, 2011

  photos from rodeo life

  photos from the ranch
 


photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski

Read more about Rodney Nelson and some of his poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


Week of February 7, 2011

Nebraska native Yvonne Hollenbeck shared this 1904 chuckwagon photo, courtesy of historian and collector Harlen Craig Wheeler of Gordon, Nebraska:


photo courtesy of Harlen Craig Wheeler

Yvonne told us:

Harlen Craig Wheeler has a wonderful collection of old photographs from the town of Gordon and the surrounding area and posts them about every day on  his Facebook page (www.facebook.com/hcwheeler).

This picture was taken in 1904 at the Spade Ranch south of Gordon, Nebraska, in the Nebraska Sandhills. At the time the Spade was running 35,000 head of cattle and the founders were Bartlett Richards and Will Comstock. The cook was a man named Jack McCormack.

Much has been written about the Spade as well as its founders. In the book Historic Ranches of the Old West by Bill O'Neal (1997; www.billonealbooks.com), it says:

Bartlett Richards, a native of Vermont, sought his fortune in western cattle ranching, moving to the Wyoming frontier as a determined eighteen-year-old in 1877. By 1884 he controlled or managed herds on several ranges under a dozen brands and started a bank at Chadron in  Northwest Nebraska. Bartlett served as President and his older brother, DeForest (later to become governor of Wyoming) was vice-president. Undeterred by government orders to pull down fencing around 61,000 acres of public land, Bartlett was equally undiscouraged by the devastating winter of 1885-86.

Recognizing the need for winter hay, by 1888, he had decided to build a cattle empire in Nebraska's nearly uninhabited by grassy Sand Hills. Bartlett originated the Spade Ranch in Sheridan County, adapting an Ace of Spades brand that would be difficult for rustlers to alter. He hauled in a few structures from the abandoned Newman Ranch on the Niobrara River. Soon he controlled a range of approximately 500,000 acres. He imported Hereford bulls and his herds grew to more than 40,000 head of improved cattle. The Spanish-American War of 1898 created a great demand for beef, causing Bartlett to expand his operations by organizing the Nebraska Land and Feeding Company in partnership with Englishman William G. Comstock.

Illegally fencing 212,000 acres of Government land and other land fraud matters eventually caused the demise of this ranching empire and its owners. The Spade Ranch was eventually reduced to merely 22,000 acres and is owned by the Bixby family, associates of Bartlett Richards, and is still in operation near the cattle shipping town of Ellsworth, Nebraska.

Find more information at:

Wikipedia, the Spade Ranch

Nebraska Historical Society, Bartlett Richards, Sheridan County

Nebraska's Spade Ranch Historical Marker

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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