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This is Page 87.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


Picture the West can be a weekly feature only if you share your photos. Help show a worldwide audience the real West.

Email your photos and their descriptions.


November 15, 2010

South Dakota rancher, poet and writer Robert Dennis shares photos from a September Black Hills trail ride.  He writes:

I have a friend from Denmark who comes every other year and spends 3 weeks here. He loves ranching and cowboying so when he is here we are horseback almost every day.

This year we took some time off from cowboying to play trail rider, or tourist.


Heading up the trail

We drove up into the Black Hills and rode up a trail to the top of Harney Peak, which is the highest point between the Rocky Mountains and the East Coast.


Yellow quakie tunnel
 

We made it to the top in three hours, over a few spots that were making us a little nervous. One horse went to his knees at one point, but no harm came to him. When you reach almost the top of the peak, there is a place to tie your horses and you climb the last hundred feet or so on foot. On top is an old fire lookout and it has several buildings that are no longer used. From this point they say you can see three states: Montana, Wyoming and South Dakota.


Quite a view

It was a beautiful day and we had a great ride. Anyone who wants to do this should look into it. There are various places in the Black Hills where they are set up for camping and lodging where you can bring your horse and stay and ride all over the Black Hills.


Coming back down

 

Robert Dennis has additional photos from this ride and many more entries on his Dennis Ranch blog: http://dennisranch.wordpress.com.



 

Robert Dennis has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West, including:

  Spring works, May, 2010

  "Cowboy farming," April 2010

  Winter pasture, January 2010

Moving heifers home in October, 2009

Moving moving a few first calf heifer pairs in June, 2009

  Mijo, his "ex-stallion"

2009 calving and branding on the Dennis Ranch

  Summer ranch photos

Photos taken while he was "out riding on yearlings"

Photos of his mares and colts

Family photos from the 1920s and 1940s

Photos and stories from his ranch and Red Owl

Area photos from the early 1900s

rdfatheruncles.jpg (54358 bytes) Family photos from the 1920s


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

Read more about Robert Dennis and read some of his poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

November 8, 2010

Author, editor, and writing teacher Heidi M. Thomas of the Pacific Northwest photos of her grandparents and their horses, whose story is a part of her latest book, Follow the Dream, a sequel to her novel, Cowgirl Dreams.

Heidi tells that her grandparents' tale is "...a featured part of the story, when they were forced by the drought to trail their herd 400 miles from Cut Bank, Montana to Salmon, Idaho."


Heidi’s grandmother “Tootsie” Gasser with a pair of draft horses.



Heidi’s grandfather, Otto Gasser, rounding up horses.



The Gassers raised draft cross horses at their ranch near Sunburst, Montana.




The Gasser horse herd in pasture near Headlight Butte, north of Cut Bank, Montana.




The crew at the chuckwagon. Heidi’s grandparents and dad (age 6) trailed their horse herd 400 miles from Cut Bank, Montana to Salmon, Idaho to find grass during the drought of the early ‘30s.



Heidi’s grandmother by the chuckwagon, ready to hit the trail.


Follow the Dream
is described:

Nettie Moser’s dreams are coming true. She’s married to her cowboy, Jake, they have plans for a busy rodeo season, and she has a once in a lifetime opportunity to rodeo in London with the Tex Austin Wild West Troupe.

But life during the Great Depression brings unrelenting hardships and unexpected family responsibilities. Nettie must overcome challenges to her lifelong rodeo dreams, cope with personal tragedy, survive drought, and help Jake keep their horse herd from disaster.

Will these challenges break this strong woman?

Read an excerpt from the book's first chapter here at Heidi M. Thomas' web site, www.heidimthomas.com, and find more about her grandmother here and elsewhere in her blog, heidiwriter.wordpress.com.


Previously, Heidi Thomas shared:

  photos of her grandmother, a Montana cowgirl

 

 

Find more about Heidi M. Thomas and her books at her web site, www.heidimthomas.com and at her blog,  heidiwriter.wordpress.com.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

November 1, 2010

In 1905, a group of "wild and wooly" cowboys, most from the Black Hills region, were invited by their friend, President Theodore Roosevelt ("Teddy" to them), to take part in his inaugural parade. The group was organized by Captain Seth Bullock of Deadwood, South Dakota. Thirty-eight members of the "Cowboy Brigade" are pictured in this photograph:


image © Cowboys & Images, www.cowboysandimages.net
Find the image and more information here at Cowboys & Images (and below)


Richard and Deborah Wadsack of Cowboys & Images and Carl Steiger, along with others, are actively searching for information about the cowboys of the Cowboy Brigade.

We first heard from Carl Steiger in July, 2010, who contacted us with information about poet Robert V. Carr (1877-1931). He told us that Carr was one of sixty cowboys in Captain Seth Bullock's Cowboy Brigade. He said he was researching the identities of the cowboys in the Cowboy Brigade, "trying to find their stories before they are lost forever."

Carl Steiger got interested in the project after researching South Dakota and Wyoming pioneer Jack Hale. He wrote, "I grew up on the JH ranch near Hulett, Wyoming. My grandfather had purchased the ranch from the daughter of Jack Hale..." He saw Jack Hale's name associated with a poster available from Richard and Deborah Wadsack at www.cowboysandimages.net, which includes the image above that pictures 38 members of the Cowboy Brigade (and names 40 of them). Carl Steiger shared the information he had collected about Jack Hale and received a poster from the Wadsacks. He writes, "It was off to the races for me on identifying these cowboys."

Working with others, including Pat Engebretson, the librarian at the Belle Fourche Public Library and Jan Botkin Therkildsen from Arvada, Colorado, information has been collected about many of the cowboys. Pat Engebretson located a copy of the March 18, 1926 Belle Fourche Bee that had an article on the first reunion of the Cowboy Brigade that was to be held during the Tri-State Roundup at Belle Fourche in July, 1926. Carl Steiger wrotes, "In that article they list the sixty cowboys that were a part of the Cowboy Brigade and the towns they were from..." He continues, "This is the best list we have of the cowboys who went, those in the picture as well as those that were not in the picture. Sixty-one are listed in addition to Captain Bullock, including John Owens of Newcastle, Wyoming, who got sick and left the train in Nebraska."

Richard Wadsack of Cowboys & Images told us about the image:

We found the photo, which we're virtually certain was one of the original prints made by the photographer—a Mr. Prince of Washington, D.C.—at an auction. What struck me most about this particular piece was the quality of the image, its impressive size, and both the large number of Westerners portrayed in a single photo and that they had been identified by name. The photograph is 'tipped' with a permanent adhesive (or that has become permanent) to the printed board that bears the names and other information.

I had been collecting Western images a while and the photo played a big part in our deciding to start our business, Cowboys & Images. The poster featuring the photo was the first lithograph we produced. Bullock and Tom Mix were known to us, of course (Mix is what started me down this road in the first place, if you've read our bio on our site), and naturally we were curious about the stories of the other men in the photo; some formative efforts to research that turned up very little.

It occurred to me we needed help, so we approached True West magazine with the idea of a contest offering a free copy of the poster to folk who could provide verifiable information on the men we were unable to pin down. To our good fortune, they agreed and featured a spread of the photo with a listing of the names, and explained the offer, in their December 2006 issue [....] all but one of the replies came from people with ancestors in the photo [....]

It's our intention to compile abbreviated stories on all the fellows in a pamphlet or booklet at some point in the near future....

They invite your biographical information about the the cowboys; a list of names is shown in our feature here, along with vintage news accounts and additional information.


image
© Cowboys & Images, www.cowboysandimages.net
Find the image and more information here at Cowboys & Images (and below)

From Cowboys & Images, by Richard Wadsack:

Toward the end of my father’s life, I learned, only by happenstance, that he had worked briefly for Tom Mix— helping tend to the famous cowboy’s equally renowned horse, “Tony.” This was during one of Mix’ tours with the Sells-Floto Circus in either 1929 or 1930. I can’t be sure.

Dad was not given to gabbing. I was in my late twenties before he ever even told me a little about his experiences in WWII, in late-night conversations over glasses of whiskey in my folks’ kitchen. It was during one of these sessions that the subject of Will Rogers came up and, in relation to Rogers, Tom Mix.

Several years after he died I got the urge to learn more about those personalities and times, in hopes of filling in the blanks between the stories and anecdotes Dad had shared with me—and to gain a fuller picture of my father, too.

My search took me farther and wider than I’d ever imagined, to the rodeo, wild west shows, silent movies, and the West that had inspired them. It became something of an obsession and, of course, I discovered I wasn’t the only one caught up in it.

Deborah and I spent thousands of hours in search of images before deciding to create this site. We hope it will be a useful and reliable resource for others—and a source of choice gifts and decoration for those who share our fondness for the American West.

www.CowboysandImages.net

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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