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This is Page 86.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollectionsó many with photosó contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


Picture the West can be a weekly feature only if you share your photos. Help show a worldwide audience the real West.

Email your photos and their descriptions.


 

October 25, 2010

Below are images in part one of a two-part entry of sheep ranching photos from Oregon, taken in 1936.

All of the photos are from the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (FSA-OWI) collection, a part of the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. 

In previous Picture the West entries we've had 1936-1942 photos from Oregon1938-194 photos from Nebraska; 1940 photos from a Quemado, New Mexico rodeo; 1939 photos from Alpine, Texas; 1940 photos from the San Angelo, Texas Fat Stock Show; and circa 1940 photos from Montana. There are more to come.

Because the photos were commissioned by the U.S. government, they are in the public domain (It is stated, "Most photographs in this collection were taken by photographers working for the U.S. Government. Work by the U.S. Government is not eligible for copyright protection.")

The FSA-OWI collection is described:

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection form an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944. This U.S. government photography project was headed for most of its existence by Roy E. Stryker, who guided the effort in a succession of government agencies: the Resettlement Administration (1935-1937), the Farm Security Administration (1937-1942), and the Office of War Information (1942-1944). The collection also includes photographs acquired from other governmental and non-governmental sources, including the News Bureau at the Offices of Emergency Management (OEM), various branches of the military, and industrial corporations. In total, the black-and-white portion of the collection consists of about 171,000 black-and-white film negatives...

The photographer of these images is Arthur Rothstein (1915-1985).

Arthur Rothstein was a student of Roy Styker, who conceived the documentary photography project for the FSA.  Among Rothstein's assignments was the documenting of cattle ranches in Montana (see a previous Picture the West entry with some of those photos here). He is noted for his photos of the people of Gee's Bend, Alabama. Read more about Arthur Rothsein here.

The Old Photos Project here  is working to identify people in the FSA photos. From the site:

.... many years  later, they have become the best record we have of what people looked like, living their lives in the first half of the 20th century, and what the
American vernacular landscape looked like as well. In many cases, the people
in these photos were not identified by the photographers, leaving us with an
enormous picture album of anonymous members of the American family, and a
treasure chest of unfinished stories.

And so, I am trying to identify some of the unnamed subjects and find out
what happened to their lives and the lives of their descendants....

Find more at the site here.

 

The photo captions below come from the FSA catalog.

 


A one-armed sheep herder. Central Oregon grazing project.
June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34- 004744-D]

 


The former Colonel Smith ranch, now the property of the Resettlement
Administration. It is the favorite stopover place for sheep in transit.
Central Oregon grazing project.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [
LC-USF34- 004754-D]

 


Herders in transit putting their sheep up for the night at a ranch on the
Resettlement Administration grazing project in central Oregon.
June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34- 004750-D]

 


Central Oregon sheep herder.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34- 004995-D]

 

Browse the FSA photos here.
 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


October 18, 2010

South Dakota ranch wife, quilting champion, and popular poet Yvonne Hollenbeck shares "then and now" photos of an important community center in Clearfield, South Dakota (Population: 1) near the Hollenbeck ranch:  the Clearfield Hall, established 1918. Many events, including occasional cowboy poetry and Western music shows, take place there today. She writes:

Here's an early-day picture of the Clearfield Hall (front part); next to it is a cream station; then garage; pool hall and Steele's Store (on end), which was a grocery store and cream station.

Here's the Clearfield Hall as it looks today:

 Not much has changed, except the cream station next door is gone. There's new siding, new roof, new windows and an air-conditioning unit, all courtesy of some hard-working women in the area who had bake sales, made a cookbook, sold lunch at farm sales, and so on to earn the money to fix the old hall up. It is still the glue that holds the community together.

The fundraising cookbook (with a cover sketch by Yvonne Hollenbeck) gives some additional history:

....The early settlers made homes of sod, and used horse-drawn equipment to farm the land. They raised large families and worked so hard to develop this community we now enjoy. Building friendships in a community was not enough, they wanted a gathering place, a hall. Nearly every man in this community contributed working skills, donated materials, money or all three. In 1916, the late Jim Dougherty hauled the first load of lumber out from Winner with his team and wagon, and construction began...constructions was not as we know today. Many people sacrificed a lot for our hall. These people had little extra time or money, but they gave both.

Gone are the sod houses. The horse-draw equipment lies rusting. The little villages that had sprung up here and there have returned to the prairie sod. One thing still remains, the Clearfield Hall. Its walls echo memories of dances and gatherings spanning 75 years. An Auxiliary was recently formed to raise money to preserve the hall. It is part of our heritage...a symbol of community spirit which began with the first homestead patent in this are....

...from 75 Years of Good Cookin', compiled by the Clearfield Hall Auxiliary (the 300-plus page cookbook is available for $11 postpaid from the Clearfield Hall Auxiliary, 30549 291st Street, Clearfield, South Dakota 57580).

For a look at how remote Clearfield is, see the map here. The census designation notes: Populated (Community) Place - Class Code U6;  A populated place that is not a census designated or incorporated place having an official federally recognized name.
 

Yvonne Hollenbeck has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  A 2009 blizzard

  What "bail out" means on a ranch

  A vintage family photo of Hollenbeck Livery

  Early photos of acclaimed writers Billie Snyder Thornburg, her sister Nellie Snyder Yost, and their family's ranch

  A tintype of her great grandfather, Ben Arnold

  Photos of another fierce winter storm


Read more about Yvonne Hollenbeck, including some of her poetry in our feature here.


 

Week of October 11, 2010

 

Indiana poet Dale Page shares a family photo. He writes:

This photo, circa 1920, is of my great-uncle, Joseph Thomas Maxey and his wife, Linnett. They homesteaded 160 acres near Wild Horse Lake, moving all their possessions from Moore, Montana, to their homestead in March, 1914. Everything they owned went into two horse-drawn wagons, one pulled by a team of two and the other by a team of four. The 78 miles took them three days to travel, camping at night in old cabins when they could find them.

Their inventory included the following:

18 chickens
2 turkeys
2 pigs
several months' supply of groceries
kitchen table
bed, springs, and mattress
homemade cupboard
2 new chairs
rocking chair
1 large chest
1 trunk
kitchen range
Singer sewing machine
1 black and white kitten

The two moved into the 12x18 one-room cabin Joe had built. As pictured, it grew to two rooms by 1915. They farmed, raised cattle, and a few horses.

By 1937, dryland farming became impossible during the Dust Bowl. They moved to Cody, Wyoming, where they died within a month of each other in 1971. Linnett wrote in her diary:

"We've had bad years, good years, sickness and good health, in all we've had a good life together, happiness, best of all our love for each other."

They never had any children and lived a somewhat lonely life on the homestead. But as Linnett said, "I always had a saddle horse to ride."

 

Dale adds, on October 14, 2010, while in Montana:

I found my Uncle Joe's homestead yesterday. All the buildings are long since gone, but we found wagon tongues and axles, a skillet, the well, and the windmill. My cousin and I are the first of the family to stand on that land since 1937, when Uncle Joe left after a bad year of range caterpillars and drought. That year, the rains came and there was a turnaround. The land has been owned by the BLM since they left. On October 17, we found Uncle Joe's next home, southwest of Cody, Wyoming. There he raised cattle and wheat on 320 acres from 1937 until 1967. We talked to a rancher who lived next to Uncle Joe. She described him to us as a man about whom no one ever said a bad thing.
 

Read about Dale Page and some of his poetry here.
 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of October 4, 2010

There's plenty of the West and Western history in Missouri, and journalist, humorist, poet, and writer Jerry Schleicher shares photos that cover two active groups there: Missouri cattle ranchers and the Missouri Cowboy Poets Association (MCPA). He writes:

About 40 members, spouses, and guests attended the Fall gathering of the Missouri Cowboy Poets Association in September, 2010, held on Richard and Laurel Dunlap's Turtle Ranch near Louisberg, Missouri. Located in south-central Missouri's Ozark Mountains, the ranch is home to a herd of purebred Saler cattle.

Hungry MCPA members and guests line up for hotdogs, ham and beans, cornbread baked in the campfire coals, salads and deserts.

Here's another view of the Turtle Ranch and some of the Saler cattle grazing in the background.


Last year I asked Richard Dunlap how they came to name their ranch the Turtle Ranch. He said when he and Laurel first bought the ranch, their turtle herd was considerably larger than their cattle herd. And, sure enough, it's not uncommon to see box turtles slowly migrating across the roads there.

[See an additional photo and more about the event in our gathering report section here.]

The Missouri Cattlemen's Association, started in 1911, has affiliate organizations in 68 counties and represents members in 93 of Missouri's 114 counties.

Find a report on the 12th annual Missouri Cowboy Poets Gathering, held in April, 2010, here
 

Jerry Schleicher shared photos from a Nebraska centennial family ranch reunion, along with some Oregon Trail history in July, 2010

 

Read about Jerry Schleicher and some of his poetry here.

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  


 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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