Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 85.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


Picture the West can be a weekly feature only if you share your photos. Help show a worldwide audience the real West.

Email your photos and their descriptions.


Week of September 27, 2010

Wyoming writer and poet Jean Mathisen Haugen shared  photos of her great-great uncle, Ernest Hornecker, who took up one of the first ranches in the Lander Valley of Wyoming in 1872.

Jean writes:

Ernest was the eldest son of Johann Martin and Ann Marie Hornecker, born in Auggen, Baden, Germany in March, 1848. His younger brother, John Martin "Mart" was also an early rancher in the valley and had a ranch adjacent to Ernest and was born in 1850 in Auggen.

The family emigrated to the U.S. in 1854 and settled on a small farm in Oregon, Missouri. Ernest and Mart were joined by two other brothers, Albert (my great grandfather, born in 1858 in Oregon,MO; and George, born in 1863 in Oregon, MO).

Ernest and Mart decided to head west and find adventure in February of 1869 along with a fellow former resident of Auggen, Jake Frey. They arrived at Cheyenne, Wyoming and first worked at digging snow out of the cuts of the new U.P. railroad then heading west. They didn't find the work to their liking, moved west to Laramie City and cut railroad ties for a time.

The boys heard of the gold rush on South Pass in west central Wyoming and started out walking overland from Laramie to Miner's Delight (they were too broke to buy horses!). They arrived at Miner's Delight, one of the three gold camps, on August 4, 1869. Mart and Ernest stayed at Miner's Delight for a couple years, but never found much gold—they spent a lot of time cutting hay with hand scythes at Lovell Meadows for the soldiers at Fort Stambaugh.

They ventured further down into the lower valleys and in 1872 Ernest and a friend, John Borner (future brother-in-law of Calamity Jane) came down to the valley of the Big Popo Agie and started a potato crop to sell to the miners on the mountain. Later that year, along with Jake Frey, they squatted on land that was still part of the Wind River Indian Reservation in what was known as Chief Washakie's Horse Pasture (at Washakie's invitation). Mart joined them a few years later and took up land adjacent to Ernest.

This first photo is of Ernest haying his fields at his Willow Brook Ranch around 1916:

This is Ernest and his two surviving brothers, Mart and Albert (who had come west in 1877 from Missouri and took up a ranch on Squaw Creek in 1884):

This is  Ernest's cabin, which he, John Borner and Jake Frey moved into on New Year's Day, 1873:

This is a photo of Ernest's daughter, Mary Hornecker (Overcash) and her first cousin, Mildred Hornecker (Lind) around 1910-11 on horseback at Willowbrook:

Ernest kept the ranch until his wife's health forced him to move to California and he died there at age 95 in 1943. Mart lived on his ranch from 1876 until his death in 1939 at age 89 and Albert lived on his ranch from 1884 until he moved to Freewater, Oregon for a few years with his family in 1901—his family and marriage broke up and he returned to his ranch in 1907 and remained there until his death in 1947 at age 89.

Ernest dictated his memories of the early days in Lander Valley to his daughter, Edna, in the 1930's and the memoirs were printed in the local Wyoming State Journal newspaper. He told of his first trip to the valley in the fall of 1869, when he walked 30 miles on foot and stayed in an abandoned miner's cabin, then hoofed it back to Miner's Delight.

Ernest and Mart became the first ranchers in the Lander country to run Black Angus cattle and their brother Albert also took up raising the breed. Mart's ranch was in family ownership for 100 years until his son, Frank, died in 1976. Albert's ranch was bought by his son John (my grandfather) and a portion (owned by my youngest uncle, Don Hornecker) remains in the family to this day.

Little remains of Ernest's ranch except for a rough log barn, a line of trees from his tree and rock homestead claim and the Borner's Garden cemetery where Ernest's only son (who died at birth) is buried) and where their father Johann Martin Hornecker is buried (he died at age 91 in 1913).

Of the three Hornecker brothers that ranched between 60 and 70 years in the Lander Valley, only Mart and Albert have descendants left here (if they all got together, it would take one of the ranches to hold them all!)


This account and photos is also included in our Western Memories feature, along with other pieces by Jean Mathisen Haugen.

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other interesting photos and stories, including:

  A photo of her great uncle's old cabin

"Great-Great Grandpa Gambled—With a Ranch and a Daughter"

A story about Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander, Wyoming

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some additional family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.
 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


Week of September 20, 2010

 

Oklahoma rancher and poet Jay Snider sends photos from the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge
northwest of Lawton, Oklahoma, where he was working cattle with his son, Rusty. Jay writes:

Rusty and I helped to gather the longhorn herd they keep on the reservation for their annual longhorn sale. They also keep a herd of buffalo that they gather for an annual sale held later on in
the year.

I hope the pictures give a hint of the landscape on the federal reserve. If it looks like there had been a fire on this part of the refuge, it's because about 3000 acres burned and we were standing on the
part where it started.

There is a web site, www.wichitamountains.fws.gov, for the Wichita Mountains Wildlife Refuge that has some interesting history. Established in 1901, the refuge consists of about 60,000 acres. The bison herd was re-introduced in 1907 and the longhorn herd was introduced in 1927. The herd we helped gather are descendants of that nucleus herd.  The annual longhorn sale is always held the third Thursday in September and the buffalo sale is the fourth Thursday in October.

The mountains are not as tall as those of the Rockies but are quite beautiful... When Rusty showed me the picture of Rocky and me, it brought back memories of Larry McWhorter and his poem "Waitin' on the Drive."

Jay Snider has shared previous photos in Picture the West:

  From along the Chisholm Trail, in October, 2009

  Generations of Snider family cowboys in April, 2009

  Photos of Jay's mother, rodeo queen and good hand, in September, 2009

  Photos and stories about Jay's grandfather, Marvin Turner (1905-1976), who was a brand inspector for the Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, in May, 2008

  Three generations of rodeoing Sniders, and four generations horseback in September, 2007

Jay Snider's Rafter S Ranch Cowboy Reunion in August, 2007

Read more about Jay Snider and some of his poetry here and visit www.JaySnider.net.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.
Jay Snider, National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Elko, Nevada 2007


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


Week of September 13, 2010

Last year, Idaho poet and teacher Denise McRea shared 1920s photos from the Pendleton Round-up, which were printed as Pendleton Drug postcards. We're re-running the photos, in celebration of the Pendleton Round-up Centennial, taking place this week.

The images were included in an album that belongs to Denise McRea's friends Bob and Myrtle Stewart. She writes:

Bob and Myrtle spent summers out on Horse Prairie, between Leadore, Idaho, and Dillon, Montana. As I understood it, they lived in Fallon, Nevada, in the winter. Myrtle and I visited often before her health got so bad. Myrtle told me that she and Georgie Sicking were friends when they were younger...There is a picture of Bob in Vanishing Breed: Photographs of the Cowboy and the West by William Albert Allard. He is moving a bunch of cows across a sagebrush flat.


Pendleton Round-up 1923 Cowgirl Relay Riders #8

Mabel Strickland is in the center. Other names (I am not positive about them all) are Bonnie Grey, Vera McGinnis, Mabel Strickland, Lorena Tricky, and Donna Hover or Haver.

[In February, 2010, Juni Fisher wrote: "I have learned in my research that sometimes the photographers mis-labeled the photos, and though it is labeled as Mabel Strickland in the center, I can tell you that is Donna Glover. Mabel is on the far right. Mabel had the poise and willowy grace of a model."

Since then, Juni has released a well-received album, Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly, which celebrates the men, women, and horses of the Pendleton Round-up—marking its 100th anniversary in 2010.  She also narrates the just-released film, Oh, You Cowgirl! (www.thecowgirlmovie.com )]
 


Indians, 1924

This shows beaded horse tack/regalia, which I found beautiful. I also loved the wooden spokes on the car wheels, the cloche hats the women spectators were wearing, and what appears to me to be a Hudson’s Bay blanket (stripes) on the man in the second row, right edge of picture.


Buddy Sterling, Bulldogging, 1924


A site here gives some background info on the photographers and Pendleton.


2009 photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski


Read more about Denise McRea and some of her poetry here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information