Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 79.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


Week of July 12, 2010

We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


 


 


photo by Mary Wegener


Nevada poet Daniel Bybee shares the following account of a 2010 branding, a poem, and photos by Mary Wegener.

My best friend’s stepson brands some of his cattle each year at a ranch in Northern California. It’s near the town of Cottonwood, in the mountains west of Red Bluff. He invites family, friends and neighbors to come up every spring for a couple of days of hard work and tall tales, along with food and drinks and friendship.


photo by Mary Wegener

We usually round up the cattle on Friday and brand all day Saturday. The cattle are mixed with three different owners and brands.

This requires lots of sorting and lots of patience, and is helped considerably by some really good cow dogs. The yard by the stock pens is usually crowded on Saturday morning with pickups, horse trailers, horses, and dogs.


photo by Mary Wegener


photo by Mary Wegener

Travis conducts his brandings in the true Californio tradition, with the calves being headed and heeled out of the herd, and then dragged over to the branding fire. This results in some really nifty riding and roping being displayed.


photo by Mary Wegener


photo by Mary Wegener


photo by Mary Wegener

With several teams of headers and heelers, the ground crew is usually running from calf to calf all day.


photo by Mary Wegener


photo by Mary Wegener

During the day, some of the more attractive and talented buckaroos (usually female) prepare that taste bud delight we call “calf fries” over the branding fire. A good roper can eat them and toss a loop at the same time.

By the time all the calves are branded and the mothered up and the herd is turned out, everyone is ready for a barbecue, a few drinks and an evening of relaxation and story-telling. And maybe a nap!


photo by Mary Wegener
 

The Cottonwood Branding

The call went out when it turned spring
to come and lend a hand and bring
a horse and rope and saddle and tack
and a good cow dog and a good strong back
 
They gathered cows with three different brands
and sortin' was done by real top hands
The calves were soon bein' roped and dragged
and tied and cut and branded and tagged
 
The ground crew knew their jobs real well
and loved the work it was easy to tell
The shots went in and the horns came off
and the burnin' hair rarely caused a cough

The cowboys' throats were full of dust
but they still laughed and joked and cussed
each time a calf kicked someone's shin
when hot iron burned a new brand in
 
Calf fries cooked on the brandin' flame
were greeted by all with great acclaim
While ropin' skills that were on display
for us to see really made our day
 
Just like their ancestors who tamed the West
They cowboy'd up and did their best
They branded close to a hundred head
and they'd all be drunk 'fore goin' to bed
 
The sun was soon low in the sky
and cowboys' throats weren't no more dry
The steaks were rare and beer was cold
as the stories of the day got told
 
Round a fire that was blazin' high
sendin' sparks into the dark night sky
The smoke was driftin' on changin' breeze
and shadows danced on Live Oak trees
 
The boys got drunk and tales got tall
and each one had a real close call
They talked of good ones that they'd rode
as night got dark and beer still flowed
 
Then one by one they staggered off drunk
lookin' for a spot to make a bunk
In darkness some would trip and fall
till the last ones left could only crawl

The sunrise came too soon for most
They woke to smells of eggs and toast
and venison sausage and taters fried up
and strong black coffee in a steamin' cup
 
The yard had horse trailers scattered around
with cowboys in 'em and on the ground
and some bedrolls in dirty truck beds
with cow dogs sleepin' by cowboys' heads
 
One by one they started to stir
while rubbin' eyes tryin' to clear the blur
of last nights drinkin' and yesterday's sweat
on legs not ready for walkin' yet
 
Each cowboy filled his coffee cup
and got his horses loaded up
Two hours later they'd cleared their heads
and headed off to their own home spreads

© 2010, Daniel Bybee
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


 

Read more about Daniel Bybee and more
of his poetry here.



 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of June 21, 2010

 

We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


 

Below are images in part one of a two-part entry of photos from Oregon, taken 1936-1942.

All of the photos are from the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (FSA-OWI) collection, a part of the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. 

In previous Picture the West entries we've had 1938-194 photos from Nebraska; 1940 photos from a Quemado, New Mexico rodeo, 1939 photos from Alpine, Texas, 1940 photos from the San Angelo, Texas Fat Stock Show; and circa 1940 photos from Montana. There are more to come.

Because the photos were commissioned by the U.S. government, they are in the public domain (It is stated, "Most photographs in this collection were taken by photographers working for the U.S. Government. Work by the U.S. Government is not eligible for copyright protection.")

The FSA-OWI collection is described:

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection form an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944. This U.S. government photography project was headed for most of its existence by Roy E. Stryker, who guided the effort in a succession of government agencies: the Resettlement Administration (1935-1937), the Farm Security Administration (1937-1942), and the Office of War Information (1942-1944). The collection also includes photographs acquired from other governmental and non-governmental sources, including the News Bureau at the Offices of Emergency Management (OEM), various branches of the military, and industrial corporations. In total, the black-and-white portion of the collection consists of about 171,000 black-and-white film negatives...

The photographers of these images are Russell Lee (1903-1986) and Arthur Rothstein (1915-1985).

Russell Lee taught photography at the University of Texas, Austin, from 1965-1973. A site devoted to a 2003 centenary exhibition of his work comments, "Although his photographic career spanned four decades, Russell Lee is best known for his work from 1936 until 1942, making pictures for the Farm Security Administration, a New Deal program designed to assist poor and destitute farmers during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression."  Find more information at Texas State University's Russell Lee Collection.

Arthur Rothstein was a student of Roy Styker, who conceived the documentary photography project for the FSA.  Among his assignments was the documenting of cattle ranches in Montana (see a previous Picture the West entry with some of those photos here). He is noted for his photos of the people of Gee's Bend, Alabama. Read more about Arthur Rothsein here.

The Old Photos Project here  is working to identify people in the FSA photos. From the site:

.... many years  later, they have become the best record we have of what people looked like, living their lives in the first half of the 20th century, and what the
American vernacular landscape looked like as well. In many cases, the people
in these photos were not identified by the photographers, leaving us with an
enormous picture album of anonymous members of the American family, and a
treasure chest of unfinished stories.

And so, I am trying to identify some of the unnamed subjects and find out
what happened to their lives and the lives of their descendants....

Find more at the site here.

The photo captions below come from the FSA catalog.





Singing cowboy songs at entertainment at the FSA (Farm Security
Administration) mobile camp for migratory farm workers. Odell, Oregon.
September 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 070358-D]

 


Resettlement Administration workers constructing a stock trail to the
Deschutes River. Central Oregon grazing project, Oregon.
June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004716-D]

 


The Deschutes River, like many of the other rivers in the arid portion of
central Oregon, is at the bottom of a steep canyon. Stock trails have been
built by Resettlement Administration workers to make the water available to cattle.

June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004719-D]

 


Cowpuncher in summer pasture. Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004947-E]




Herding cattle in summer pasture. Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF346- 004945-E]
 



Farm scene on farm of FSA (Farm Security Administration) rehabilitation
borrower Nyssa Heights, Oregon, Malheur County. The first year that this
land on the Owyhee irrigation project is farmed it is impossible to grow any
crops except hay. The farmers in the beginning had a few cows because of
lack of funds to start herds, but within two or three years, herds began to
increase and now much of the feed on the farm is used by home herd.
May 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 039046-D]

 


Cattle on farm of FSA (Farm Security Administration) rehabilitation
borrower. Vale-Owyhee irrigation project, Malheur County, Oregon.
May 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 039057-D]

 


Seneca, Oregon. Loading cattle hides onto truck.
July 1942, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF346- 073497-D]

 

Next in this series...sheep ranching in Oregon...

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information