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This is Page 77.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


Week of June 28, 2010

We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


 


Rancher, poet, and writer Paul Kern took part in a 150th anniversary Pony Express Re-Ride in Utah in June, 2010, and he shares the following account and photos:

Last February, I was recruited to ride the Pony Express by the Pat Hearty, former National President of the Pony Express Association and Diana Van Uitert, secretary of the Utah Chapter. This year commemorates the 150th anniversary of the short-lived, but iconically American venture.


photo by Cindy Furse
Taking the oath

All riders were sworn in using the original oath used back in the day and are expected to be expert horsemen, willing and capable of riding at a gallop for an extended period, day or night, in any kind of weather. 


photo by Beverly Heffernan
Paul Kern in the rain

The portion of the Pony Express Trail that runs through Utah is 210 miles long. About half of that distance is in the same condition as it was 150 years ago—from the Nevada border through to just outside the small town of Faust. Riders are divided into three teams, each responsible for moving the mail pouch (mochila) up to 90 miles. Each 90-mile stretch is divided into 2-mile segments that are assigned to the express riders. A rider can take multiple segments and ride as far as 10 miles.


photo by Cindy Furse
The Mochila

At the end of each ride, the mochila—a heavy leather contraption with four locked pouches to hold the mail with cut-outs to fit over a western saddle—is taken off the incoming horse and put on to the outgoing horse in the relay; the rider mounts and off they go. We were able to make this exchange in less than a minute.


photo by Cindy Furse
Handing off the Mochila


photo by Cindy Furse
Paul Kern and his horse Rory watch the next rider leave

Our team picked up the mail on the Nevada border near Ibapah and carried it 90 miles to the original Pony Express station at Simpson Springs. A replica station house has been built just across the road from the ruins of the original building.


photo by Cindy Furse
Replica station house at Simpson Springs

Upon our arrival in Simpson Springs, the town of Tooele put on a celebration with live music, cowboy poetry and a lot of food to highlight the significance of the re-ride.

During the entire event, I had a very distinct impression that this was important and that it was a great privilege to be part of it.

Be sure the visit the National Pony Express Association website at: www.xphomestation.com.
 



 

Paul Kern has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  A story from his family's history...

  Words and images from a backcountry ride...

Photos in a tribute to Utah rancher Joe Mascaro 

Contemporary photos for Father's Day, 2007

  Vintage photos of his grandfather



 

Read more about Paul Kern, see some of his photos, and read some of his poetry here.

Visit his blog at www.PaulKern.com.


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of June 21, 2010

 

We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


 

Below are images in part one of a two-part entry of photos from Oregon, taken 1936-1942.

All of the photos are from the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (FSA-OWI) collection, a part of the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. 

In previous Picture the West entries we've had 1938-194 photos from Nebraska; 1940 photos from a Quemado, New Mexico rodeo; 1939 photos from Alpine, Texas; 1940 photos from the San Angelo, Texas Fat Stock Show; and circa 1940 photos from Montana. There are more to come.

Because the photos were commissioned by the U.S. government, they are in the public domain (It is stated, "Most photographs in this collection were taken by photographers working for the U.S. Government. Work by the U.S. Government is not eligible for copyright protection.")

The FSA-OWI collection is described:

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection form an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944. This U.S. government photography project was headed for most of its existence by Roy E. Stryker, who guided the effort in a succession of government agencies: the Resettlement Administration (1935-1937), the Farm Security Administration (1937-1942), and the Office of War Information (1942-1944). The collection also includes photographs acquired from other governmental and non-governmental sources, including the News Bureau at the Offices of Emergency Management (OEM), various branches of the military, and industrial corporations. In total, the black-and-white portion of the collection consists of about 171,000 black-and-white film negatives...

The photographers of these images are Russell Lee (1903-1986) and Arthur Rothstein (1915-1985).

Russell Lee taught photography at the University of Texas, Austin, from 1965-1973. A site devoted to a 2003 centenary exhibition of his work comments, "Although his photographic career spanned four decades, Russell Lee is best known for his work from 1936 until 1942, making pictures for the Farm Security Administration, a New Deal program designed to assist poor and destitute farmers during the Dust Bowl and the Great Depression."  Find more information at Texas State University's Russell Lee Collection.

Arthur Rothstein was a student of Roy Styker, who conceived the documentary photography project for the FSA.  Among his assignments was the documenting of cattle ranches in Montana (see a previous Picture the West entry with some of those photos here). He is noted for his photos of the people of Gee's Bend, Alabama. Read more about Arthur Rothsein here.

The Old Photos Project here  is working to identify people in the FSA photos. From the site:

.... many years  later, they have become the best record we have of what people looked like, living their lives in the first half of the 20th century, and what the
American vernacular landscape looked like as well. In many cases, the people
in these photos were not identified by the photographers, leaving us with an
enormous picture album of anonymous members of the American family, and a
treasure chest of unfinished stories.

And so, I am trying to identify some of the unnamed subjects and find out
what happened to their lives and the lives of their descendants....

Find more at the site here.

The photo captions below come from the FSA catalog.





Singing cowboy songs at entertainment at the FSA (Farm Security
Administration) mobile camp for migratory farm workers. Odell, Oregon.
September 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 070358-D]

 


Resettlement Administration workers constructing a stock trail to the
Deschutes River. Central Oregon grazing project, Oregon.
June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004716-D]

 


The Deschutes River, like many of the other rivers in the arid portion of
central Oregon, is at the bottom of a steep canyon. Stock trails have been
built by Resettlement Administration workers to make the water available to cattle.

June, 1936, Arthur Rothstein

Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004719-D]

 


Cowpuncher in summer pasture. Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 004947-E]




Herding cattle in summer pasture. Deschutes National Forest, Oregon.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF346- 004945-E]
 



Farm scene on farm of FSA (Farm Security Administration) rehabilitation
borrower Nyssa Heights, Oregon, Malheur County. The first year that this
land on the Owyhee irrigation project is farmed it is impossible to grow any
crops except hay. The farmers in the beginning had a few cows because of
lack of funds to start herds, but within two or three years, herds began to
increase and now much of the feed on the farm is used by home herd.
May 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 039046-D]

 


Cattle on farm of FSA (Farm Security Administration) rehabilitation
borrower. Vale-Owyhee irrigation project, Malheur County, Oregon.
May 1941, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF34- 039057-D]

 


Seneca, Oregon. Loading cattle hides onto truck.
July 1942, Russell Lee
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection,
[LC-USF346- 073497-D]

 

Next in this series...sheep ranching in Oregon...

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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