Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 73.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


Week of May 10, 2010


We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


previous  photos

index of all photos


Writer, poet, and gathering organizer Smoke Wade was raised on a ranch in the Hells Canyon region of the Snake River along the Idaho-Oregon border. He contributed a story and poem in a Mother's Day tribute to his mother, Betty Jean Tippett and shared these photos and comments about her life in Washington and Oregon:

 

Mom was born and raised at the family homestead on Joseph Creek in Asotin County, Washington. Pictured here with her grandmother Wilson and her older brother, Jack Tippett in front of their Joseph Creek home. (circa 1923)

 

Betty Jean and her sister, Barbara, were cowgirls in the true sense of the word. Raised remotely in a region without roads, they relied on horses for all their travel, as well as, routine ranch life duties. In this photo at their Joseph Creek ranch, the two sisters (Betty on the right) are pictured in traditional cowgirl attire of the times. (circa 1935)

 

In this photo Betty Jean (on the right) is shown saddled up and ready to ride with other local cowgirls from neighboring ranches on Joseph Creek. (circa 1935)

 

(My favorite photo) Mom, about age 16, poses along the trail from the Joseph Creek Ranch to the post office at Rogersburg, some six miles away. At this time, there were no roads to town. The nearest town, Asotin, Washington, was a hard two day ride away. Rogersburg boasted a combined store and post office as well as a scheduled stop for river boats that connected my mother's family with the outside world. In this photo, she is probably dressed in her cowgirl finest including mail order trousers that she could grow into as was the custom then. In the back ground is Cactus Flats where the annual branding of the Hashknife cattle took place. (circa 1937)

 

Mother's family were cattlemen and horsemen. They were often photographed together on horse back. With four brothers and a sister, there were enough cowboys and cowgirls to operate a large cattle operation without hiring too much outside help. The ranch did support several seasonal hired men to help with breaking horses, irrigating the fields, putting up hay, feeding cattle in the winter and building fence. One such hired man that helped with breaking horses was well-known horse trainer, Tom Dorrance, California. Pictured left to right and youngest to oldest—the Tippett family—Doug, Biden, Barbara, Bob, Betty Jean (In all white), Jack, Grandma Jesse and Granddad Jidge. (circa late 1940s)

 

After mom was married, she and my father lived on the Joseph Creek home ranch for a few years. In the harsh winter of 1948-49, we moved as a family to the old town site of Rogersburg, Washington at the confluence of the Grande Ronde river where it joins with the Snake River of Hells Canyon. The ranch house had sat vacant several years and the old post office and general store had been abandoned for about ten years. There was now a road connecting with the town of Asotin, Washington, some 28 miles down river. In this photo, Betty Jean stands on the front porch of the Rogersburg ranch house, a ghost house that she and dad transformed into our family home for many years to come. (circa early 1950s)

Betty Jean during her teenage years at the Cold Springs cow camp in Wallowa county, Oregon. Her family would spend a portion of the summer at this high elevation cow camp before moving the cattle on to fall pasture and the livestock sales yard in Enterprise, Oregon.

 

The Rogersburg ranch, circa 1950. The building with the white roof was the Rogersburg schoolhouse my father relocated to make into a shop. This was the schoolhouse my grandmother taught school at. The small brown building to the left of the schoolhouse was the Rogersburg saloon. And the large brown barn beyond was a warehouse left over from the steamboat days when river boats hauled wool from the canyon.
 

Smoke Wade has contributed many interesting stories and photos to Western Memories and Picture the West, including:

  "The Crossing"...

 pack string stories and photos...

  photos and recollections about summer haying

  photos and recollections that center around log troughs

photos from the 1952 branding of the Hashknife calves at the Cactus Flat branding corral, posted here

a 1905 photo of the one-room school in Joseph Creek, Washington, which he attended for six years (and which his grandmother, mother, brother, cousins, aunt and uncles attended), more photos, and some history and recollections, which you can see here.

smokevintagesmo.JPG (17853 bytes) a circa 1915 photo of his grandfather, J. H. "Jidge" Tippett, taken at the Tippett home ranch on Joseph Creek in Asotin Country, Washington, and other photos of the area, which you can see here.

  photos of the gold mining ghost town, Bodie, California, which you can see here

and some contemporary photos from Rachel, Nevada, posted here.


photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

Read some of Smoke Wade's poetry here.

You can email Smoke Wade.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.

 


 

   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information