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This is Page 68.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


Week of March 8, 2010


 

Poet Nona Kelley Carver writes:

I live in a small valley in western Colorado about fifty miles from the Little Book Cliffs Wild Horse Range. Approximately 130 to 150 horses live in the rugged canyons and sagebrush flats. The herd is closely monitored and kept from getting too big by darting some of the mares with PZP for birth control. Sometimes, horses are rounded up and put up for adoption.

We use our four wheel drive vehicle to get into the area, but travel beyond the road is by foot or horseback only. We take our binoculars and camera and wait. We have seen over thirty of these beautiful horses in a day.

She included the photo above with her poem:

 

The Wild Horses

There’s a place beyond the Book Cliffs
where wild horses still run free.
With manes and tails just flying,
they’re quite a sight to see!

Blacks and bays and pintos
go streaming through the sage…
With colts beside their mothers,
despite their younger age.

In spring when grass is lush and green,
oh, how they love their range.
They guard and keep a watchful eye,
for some things never change.

The little foals lie in the grass
and warm in summer sun.
They play and chase on spindly legs,
as they, too, learn to run.

They nibble on the tender plants
and drink their mother’s milk.
So long and glossy grow their manes;
their coats as soft as silk.

Freedom is their heritage,
like those of long ago.
They do not want to be penned in.
Their speed is never slow.

Swift as the wind they disappear
beyond a rocky ledge,
to see the river far below,
smooth water at its edge.

Such a pleasure do I feel
to see them wild and free.
I hope their home beneath the clouds
lasts through eternity.

And may their spirits always lift
wherever they should roam.
May their place of higher ground
forever be their home.

© 2008,  Nona Kelley Carver
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted  without the author's written permission.

Photos and collage presentation by Alfred Carver

Read more about Nona Kelley Carver and some of her poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of March 1, 2010

Rancher, poet, and storyteller Kent Rollins shares some photos from near his ranch along the Red River south of Hollis, Oklahoma. 

Kent wrote about this photo, which he calls "The Night Guard," that "...an ole windmill in our area is always a landmark, 'Waiting for the breath of life, so it to can bring the life to others, a simple motion yet so powerful,'" it has been here west of the house for as long as I can remember."

In late January, 2010, that scene changed with a serious winter storm and severe ice damage that left the region without power for up to a week:

Kent also shared this photo, which he calls "My Commute Home":

And he comments on the photo below, "I was horseback headed for the house and just happen to stop long enough to see this. It made me think, 'If the world was just black and white, you could still look close enough to see the real beauty of the American West.'"

 

Kent is also an accomplished chuckwagon cook. He offers a "Cooking Bootcamp," where participants learn about chuckwagon cooking and more, while camped at an old cow camp (see a video about it here at his web site and see a previous Picture the West entry with photos here).




Photo by Kathy Johnson

Read more about Kent Rollins and some of his poetry here and visit www.kentrollins.com.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.



Week of February 22, 2010

Author Liz Adair shared family photos from New Mexico. Her recent book, Counting the Cost, is based on the life of her uncle, cowboy Curtis Hext Smith. She writes:

This is Curtis Hext Smith, the cowboy whose life is shadowed in the book Counting the Cost. This would have been taken mid 1930s. 

This photo, from the same time frame, is one of the New Mexico ranches my uncles worked on.  

This is a rodeo in southern New Mexico in the 1930s.  One or more of my uncles would have been riding in it. 

This is is a picture of my grandmother and grandfather, Carrie Della and Nathan Smith with their daughter Gertrude. The picture was taken at their ranch in the San Andreas Mountains in New Mexico.  The man standing beside my grandfather, holding the horses, is Eugene Manlove Rhodes, an early writer of western literature.  He and my grandfather were friends.  Gertrude was born in 1904, so this probably was taken in 1905. 

Liz Adair writes about the photo below here on her blog:

It’s a picture of my mother and my grandmother, on their way to Hot Springs, New Mexico from Seligman, Arizona in about 1934. The saddle and bedroll belonged to my Uncle Curtis, who was traveling with them on this trip.

About Counting the Cost:

Counting the Cost is the story of Heck Benham, a cowboy who falls in love with Ruth Reynolds, a socialite from back East. Defying convention, they run off to live in a remote cow camp and find that love won't necessarily conquer all, especially not in Depression-era New Mexico. Cultural differences threaten to tear them apart, but when tragedy strikes, they realize what is most important in life. 
 
An Award Finalist in the Western Literature division of the National Best Books 2009 Awards, Counting the Cost was described as "a historically correct picture" of "the life and loves of a hardworking cowboy" by Julee Brady, founding member of Cowgirls Historical Foundation.

Read more about the book here in our news here and at the publisher's site, www.Inglestonepublishing.com.

Find a short video about the book here at Liz Adair's blog.

Read more about Liz Adair at her
"Liz Sez" blog: sezlizadair.blogspot.com


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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