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This is Page 53.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollectionsó many with photosó contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


July 6, 2009

Journalist and photographer Jeri Dobrowski shares photos, with comments, from her prairie flower garden on the Montana-North Dakota border:


Anemone patens: Wild Crocus or Pasqueflower

We know it's officially spring on the Great Plains when the crocus poke their heads up through the grass. Their short stems make it difficult to find a container small enough to serve as a vase. This demitasse cup works nicely.
 


Tulips

My mother loved tulips. She's given me gallons of bulbs through the years as she thinned her beds.


Thermopsis rhombifolia: Golden Pea

Growing up, we called these sweet peas. They were the first flower of the spring (we didn't have crocus). They have the most heavenly-sweet fragrance!


Fawn

June 12, 2009: Found while looking for asparagus.


Oriental Poppies

I got the start of these from my paternal grandmother, Hallie Janssen, who raised them in her garden at Coalwood, Montana. She admonished me when she gave the plants to me: "Put them someplace where you don't care if they take over, because they will!" Our soil is less than ideal, and they've done just what she said they would.


Lilacs

A June hailstorm three years ago took a toll on all our trees. This is the first year since that we've had much of anything for lilac blossoms. On June 6, we received 3" of snow. It was the first time I've seen snow on lilac blossoms.


Tame Sunflowers

Both common and cultivated sunflowers thrive in the heat and dry conditions of the Great Plains. Wild sunflowers grow alongside roads and in the ditches, or wherever native sod has been disturbed. Confectionary and oilseed sunflowers are grown by area farmers.


California Poppies (with petrified wood accents)

This oak water tank sets out in front of our house. My father-in-law had used it when he ran cattle on the place. We replaced it with an electric, heated waterer. It was languishing in a state of neglect in the hay yard when I got the idea to use it for a flower bed. It took a considerable time and effort to rehydrate and move it.


California Poppies

I have another variety of hardy California Poppies growing in a rock garden that have white or albino petals mixed in with the the more common yellowish-orange flowers.


Shepherdia argentea: Silver Buffaloberries

In 2008, the buffaloberries were amazingly plentiful in our part of the country, so much so that the bushes appeared red from a distance, rather than the usual gray/green. My husband and I spent one Sunday afternoon picking these tiny berries so I could make a batch of pancake syrup. I blended them with chokecherries, which were in short supply last year. Thorns on buffaloberry bushes make picking slow and painful. I've heard some folks say to wait until after a frost, lay a tarp beneath the bush, and to knock, tap, or beat them off with a stick. I really need to give that a try sometime.


See more flower photos here at Jeri Dobrowski's web site, and many more photos, including a gallery of Western performers and others, here at the site.


Jeri Dobrowski has contributed many other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  Highway signs from the eastbound I-94 Rest Area between Rosebud and Hathaway, Montana.

  Photos and historical markers from Montana's Highway 12

  Photos of her family's veterans for Veteran's Day

  A special Fourth of July photo

  Photos and stories from the early 1900s in Coalwood, Montana, where her great grandfather John W. Janssen was postmaster and proprietor of the general store

  Photos about her grandfather and "all the things he ever rode..."
 

Family photos of generations of veterans and some additional World War I photos

Family photos from Yellowstone, from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s

Contemporary photos for the Fourth of July

  1940s-era photos about McNierney Livestock

 

Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.

See her gallery of Western performers and others at her site here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

June 29, 2009

Dorothy Raaf of Strandburg, South Dakota shared photos from the 17th Annual South Dakota Mule Ride. She writes:

The South Dakota Mule Ride is held the first full weekend in June each year and each year it is at a different location. My husband and I are fairly new at attending, with 2009 being our 4th ride.

This year it was held on the Robinson Flats between Hot Springs and Edgemont, South Dakota. We all gather on Thursday and share a meal on that evening. All meals are catered through Sunday morning. We camp out with primitive campsites and most of us have mule trailers with living quarters or some do the canvas tent setup. Rides are on Friday and Saturday. Sunday morning is breakfast and cowboy church service. After that we break camp.
 


People attend from several states and this year along with the South Dakota Mule Riders, there were folks from Wyoming, Colorado, Minnesota, Iowa and Nebraska as well as Wisconsin. We are from South Dakota but the other side of the state, so it was a 500 mile trip one way for us.


Last year's ride was in the South Dakota Badlands, the year before that it was near Avon, and the first year we attended it was in the Cave Hills near Buffalo.

Janna Morris of Blackhawk is the hard working lady who has been organizing the Ride since we have been going and there have been several others who also worked hard as well over the years.

Some of the photos were taken by our friend who also attended, Kelly Krueger of Baudett, Minnesota.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

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