Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 52.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



previous weeks' photos

index of all photos



   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

June 22, 2009


Montana singer and songwriter Stephanie Davis reports on the happenings at her Trail's End Ranch with periodic Ranch News postings at her web site, www.stephaniedavis.net. The entries are filled with characters (both human and animal), history, cowboy philosophy, humor, and her always-interesting observations.

We'll be excerpting that news now and then for Picture the West. Here are some recent entries:


ON FENCING AND FENCING GLOVES...

Well, fence-fixing season is upon us here at Trail’s End. That means loading up the fencing pliers, posts, post pounder, goldenrod, staples, hooks, wire, hatchet, sandwiches, Gatorade, and of course, fencing gloves, and heading out to try to remedy the damage that wind, weather, and wildlife have done to the fences over the long winter. Depending on the terrain and the job, this is done by foot, horseback, or four-wheeler. It is one of the ranch jobs that our cranky foreman, Rick, admits to actually enjoying, especially if he is out with the dogs in the middle of nowhere on a blue-sky day.


A good day for checking fence...Granite Peak (Montana's highest)
 and Beartooth Mts. in background


 A "deadman"...it's a weight (in this case, rocks) which counteracts the pull of the fence.
Some, like this one our friend Slim Campbell built on the ranch, can be downright artistic.


Slim Campbell, ace fencer and deadman builder

If Rick is particular about fencing gloves in general (“They have to have a reinforced palm, and not be so tough you can’t fold your hand, a soft leather, but something that will hold up”), he is downright fanatical about his broken-in gloves. The Holy Grail had less supervision, and don’t even THINK about asking to borrow them. He says a glove is at its best when it’s on its last leg, when it’s coated in sweat and oil and blood and the fingers are dang near poking through. Which takes forever. Which means the air turns indigo when he misplaces one or the dog runs off with it. Which happens at least hourly during fence-fixing season. Here’s wishing all you post pounders and wire stretchers soft ground, good weather, and a sense of humor to get you through the season. May your gloves always be where you last left them, and may you always remember where that is.


Tillie guards Rick’s pert-near perfectly broken in gloves


Rick’s ALMOST broken-in fencing gloves
 

 

ROOT CELLAR DREAMS

One of the many things I love about the ranch is the root cellar. It is a little masterpiece of stone masonry, built by the man who homesteaded the place in the 1920s. His name was Fred Poston, supposedly a stone mason from Iowa. I think of all the muscle, sweat, hopes, and dreams he put into each carefully placed stone, and how ironic that, soon after building it, he would “starve out,” as a neighbor put it, and return to Iowa.


The root cellar, winter

The root cellar is still remarkably cool and air-tight today. We joke about turning it into a wine cellar, but for now it serves as a testament to craftsmanship, hard work, and big dreams.

 

 

THE GUSTAVSON PLACE

Another favorite part of the ranch is the old Gustavson place. This charming homestead was built in 1910 or so by the Gustavson family, some of whose relatives still live in the area. It was later sold to the Daggetts, who held the ranch for 93 years before selling it to me. But for centuries before all that, due to its lower elevation, mild winters, and plentiful game, the area was a winter camp for the Crow Indians. In fact, it was the last place the Crow camped before they moved in 1909 to their current reservation. The camp is even mentioned in Andrew Garcia’s wonderful book, Tough Trip Through Paradise.

Walking along the creek, you can almost see the rows of teepees, smell the campfire smoke, hear the Crow children at play. It is startling to think that just a short hundred years ago, this ordinary looking alfalfa field was a village. Although my own searches for evidence of the camp haven’t yielded much, Bob Daggett, one of the original Daggett sons, found plenty. On a visit to the ranch a couple years ago, he spoke of plowing the field as a boy with his mule team. It got to the point, he said, that he came to dread the sound of the plow scraping rock, as this usually meant having to stop and hand excavate yet another teepee ring--the round, heavy circle of stones that held a teepee in place. When asked about finding arrowheads, he again ruefully smiled and shook his head. Apparently they were so plentiful that his mother got tired of storing them and tossed out a large bucket full somewhere on the place. How I’d love to stumble across that bucket!


 


photo by Clark Marten

Read more about Stephanie Davis in our feature here.

Read more Ranch News here at Stephanie Davis' web site.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


   

        

       

     

       

     

     

     

    

     

   

     

  

 

 

 

 

 

Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See an index of all past photos here.

 

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information