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This is Page 38.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



previous weeks' photos

index of all photos



December 29, 2008


Poet Doc Mayer lives and works on Morning Star Ranch, west of Roy, New Mexico, where the Canadian River escarpment cuts down through the caprock. He's been an artist for twenty odd years and has lived on his ranch since around 1985. He shared some photos from his web site:


Front yard view


Fog in the canyon


A Promise For Tomorrow

Read more about Doc Mayer and his poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


December 22, 2008

 

Poet Babs Hamilton shares photos of the Manitoba Prairie. She told us:

On the southwestern Manitoba prairies, the winters can get mighty cold! Our barn cats know how to keep warm though. They keep an eye out for my Morgan gelding Guinness. He gets nice and furry in the winter and provides the ultimate “thermal blanket” for his passengers.


"Keeping Warm"
 

Across from the building where I work (Canadian Forces Base Shilo, Manitoba), the scenery can be breathtaking. We often get this type of Hoar Frost in late winter here on the Southwestern Manitoba prairies. The showing that Mother Nature provides is awe inspiring and just beautiful…regardless of the frigid temperatures.


"Hoar Frost"
 

Read more about Babs Hamilton and her poetry here.
 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

December 15, 2008

 

Journalist and photographer Jeri Dobrowski has been photographing the signs along Montana's highways. The signs have a number of connections to cowboy poetry.

Montana engineer, writer and poet, Robert "Bob" Fletcher (1885-1972), the author of the poem "Open Range" (which was Cole Porter's inspiration for the song "Don't Fence Me In") worked for the Montana Department of Highways. He conceived and created the text for the state's first historical road markers. The text of those markers was published in a 1938 book, Montana's Historical Highway Markers, which has since been reprinted  and updated several times.

Montana folklorist Michael Korn writes in the foreword to the 1999 edition of the book, "In 1935, Bob Fletcher convinced the powers-that-be to place road signs throughout Montana at points of historical significance or interest at those places that suggested a good story ...Fletcher's personal acquaintance with many of the men and women who had helped build the state provided more fuel for his ideas and supplied him with the stories and the embroidery for the texts that were cut into the original signs....Many Montanans and countless visitors took their first history lessons about the state by reading Bob's signs..."

The photos below by Jeri Dobrowski are from Highway 12.

The sign below is at the Highway 12 rest area, between Plevna and Miles City, and tells of cowboy and poet D.J. O'Malley (1867-1943) and quotes from his poem "After the Roundup":

Lyndel Meikle writes in Cowboy Miner Productions' collection of O'Malley works, Cowboy Poetry: Classic Rhymes and Prose by D. J. O'Malley, The N Bar N Kid White: 

His career as a cowboy poet began in 1889 when he penned "To the Memory of Wiley Collins" about a chuck wagon cook who was killed by lightning. Over the next half century, he wrote many poems and stories about the men and the work he knew, often using the pen name N Bar N Kid White. Some, such as "When The Work's All Done This Fall," (which was originally called "After the Round-up") were popularized in song...

The sign below is located on Highway 12, on the west side of Powder River:
 

Jeri writes about the photo below:

This is the turn off from Montana Highway 12, the east side of Powder River, near what once was Locate, Montana. The road goes to Campbell Ranch, homesteaded by my great-grandfather Edward Campbell and operated today by my cousin and her husband, Cassie & Bill Erickson.

There are more photos to come, from other areas, in future postings.

Jeri Dobrowski has contributed many other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  Photos of her family's veterans for Veteran's Day

  A special Fourth of July photo

  Photos and stories from the early 1900s in Coalwood, Montana, where her great grandfather John W. Janssen was postmaster and proprietor of the general store

  Photos about her grandfather and "all the things he ever rode..."
 

Family photos of generations of veterans and some additional World War I photos

Family photos from Yellowstone, from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s

Contemporary photos for the Fourth of July

  1940s-era photos about McNierney Livestock

 

Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.

See her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


December 8, 2008

 

South Dakota ranch wife, quilting champion, and popular poet Yvonne Hollenbeck shares ranch photos. She told us:

This is what a "bail out" is called on a cattle ranch.

Yvonne included this poem:

The Bail-Out Plan

A “Bail Out” plan in Ag-Land is to feed some livestock hay,
and not the type of bail-out plan in Washington today.

When country folks lose money, which happens most the time,
they don’t receive a handout …not even one thin dime.

The “stock market” to them is the price that critters bring,
and “bear” is something they all fear when calving in the spring.

“Bull” to them’s a critter that they use to breed a cow;
their market is the Sale Barn and on Wall Street it’s the “Dow.”

There’s never been a program to bail out the livestock man;
when things get tough their motto is to “hang on if you can.”

Remember in the 80’s when the markets were so low,
and interest hit an all-time high? There was no bail-out dough.

Half the farms and ranches were foreclosed on and were lost;
no bail-out plan was offered and the small towns bore the cost.

Then more were lost in ’96 when blizzards swept the range
and then came several years of drought but still there was no change

in attitudes in Washington, they didn’t seem to care.
I doubt they even knew there was a problem way out there.

But, here in Ag-land when there’s troubles, neighbors help their fellowman;
they don’t depend on Washington to have a “bail-out” plan.

Yet, in cities there are houses that are bigger than our barns,
and when folks can’t make their payments, our Congress says, “Well, darn!

We’ll gather up some billions and help their bankers out,
and then help Fred and Fannie and “beef ‘em up,” no doubt.

So, in essence what I’m saying, “I’ve a plan to bail us out
of all the troubles we are in,” a good one, there’s no doubt.

When we have the next election, we all can take this stand:
Let’s send Washington some leaders who make their living off the land.

© 2008, Yvonne Hollenbeck
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


 

Yvonne and Glen Hollenbeck raise cattle and quarter horses on their ranch in Clearfield, South Dakota.

 

Yvonne Hollenbeck has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  a vintage family photo of Hollenbeck Livery

  early photos of acclaimed writers Billie Snyder Thornburg, her sister Nellie Snyder Yost, and their family's ranch

  a tintype of her great grandfather, Ben Arnold

  photos of a fierce winter storm


Read more about Yvonne Hollenbeck, including some of her poetry in our feature here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


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Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See past weeks' photos starting with the most recent, here.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

 

 

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