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This is Page 34.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


September 22, 2008


previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


 

Oklahoma rancher and poet Jay Snider once mentioned that his mother was a rodeo queen, and we asked him to share some photos: 

 

Jay told us:

I could write volumes about stories Mom and Grandad told about how good a "hand" Mom was while growing up. One story that was always a favorite of mine is how Grandad would match her and her Palomino stud and some of the good cowboys and their cow horses to a good old-fashioned horse race. Mom says that she seldom got beat and it sure made those cowboys' pockets a whole lot emptier. She could ride and rope with the best of 'em.

Mom was the very first Walters, Oklahoma rodeo queen in 1947. The picture up above was taken at the rodeo parade that year in downtown Walters.

Since then, she married a rodeo cowboy from New Mexico and helped to raise six kids (come to think of it, she's still raising six kids), a whole lot of grand kids, and is fondly starting on the great grand kids.
 

[Read more about this photo here. Jay's father's rodeo career began in the early 1940s and he continued to rope steers up until the last couple of years. Jay's parents are shown with seven of the nine saddles his father won through the years in the Senior Pro Rodeo Association and the National Old Time Ropers Association.

A recent photo of the Snider family's cowboys—including Jay, his two brothers, two sons, two nephews, and father—will be featured inside of the 2009 edition of The BAR-D Roundup. ]

Jay Snider has shared previous photos in Picture the West:

  Photos and stories about Jay's grandfather, Marvin Turner (1905-1976), who was a brand inspector for the Texas & Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association, in May, 2008

  Three generations of rodeoing Sniders, and four generations horseback in September, 2007

Jay Snider's Rafter S Ranch Cowboy Reunion in August, 2007

Read more about Jay Snider and some of his poetry here.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.
Jay Snider, National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Elko, Nevada 2007

 


  Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


September 15, 2008

 

Wyoming writer and poet Jean Mathisen Haugen shared this photo of her great uncle's old cabin:

She told us:

This is a photo I took of my great uncle Gillis Mathisen's cabin out at the south end of Sheep Mountain about 30 miles southeast of Lander.

Gillis was a cowboy all his life, along with being a carpenter and quite an artist. He was born in 1910 on his father's birthday on February 4th at the family homestead at Deadman's Gulch, six miles south of Lander. He passed away in 1995.

He homesteaded his place in 1935, along with the homestead my Grandpa Mathisen took up a few miles away on Twin Creek and the other homestead his brother Red Mathisen took up at Louis Miller Springs. His old cabin is gradually falling to the years, but it is rather picturesque. At one time it was quite a nice cabin (with a heckuva crop of rattlesnakes around it!).
 

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other interesting photos and stories, including:

"Great-Great Grandpa Gambled—With a Ranch and a Daughter"

A story about Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander, Wyoming

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some additional family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.
 

 


  Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


September 8, 2008


previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


California poet and writer Susan Parker shares pictures from California's Calaveras County, and poetry:

Outside Valley Springs, California
Calaveras County


“And where are they whose voices
Rang out o’er hill and dale?
Gone;—and their mournful history
Is but an oft-told tale.
There smiles no lovelier valley
Beneath the summer sun,
Yet they who dwelt together there
Departed one by one.”


These words written by Marguerite St. Leon Loud in her poem “The Deserted Homestead,” rang out as my peripheral vision caught sight of this “tribute to deferred maintenance” located along Highway 12 just outside the town of Valley Springs in Calaveras County, part of California’s "gold country."


Returning from an event in the former mining town of Angels Camp, I was flying high on excitement because of the enthusiastic reception the poetry from my “Vanishing Voices” project had received. The sight of this old homestead threw my mind in reverse, back to a time when there stood a thriving ranch. I whipped the car around, driving back to take photos.

I discovered Mrs. Loud’s poem in an anthology compiled by Caroline May, published in 1869, titled
The American Female Poets: with Biographical and Critical Notices. What I loved about this poem is that, even though it was written sometime before 1869, the story is one that continues today as children from all walks of life leave home “to seek their fortune” or simply for the adventure. Some will return, perhaps; others will not.

Angling the camera for just the right shot, ever mindful I was walking in sandals through tall, wheat-colored grass, I wondered about the family who once lived here. A soft breeze fluttered through the broken window panes, echoing the sadness this photo-moment evoked. Sun-baked gray siding creaked in summer’s heat as one lone board, hanging by a single rusted nail, clung to the sway-backed roof. I stood and pondered on what might have been, who these people were, and what happened to them. Ah! I feel a poem lurking there and a need to revisit the site for research!



Enjoy the photos and Mrs. Loud’s poem.

THE DESERTED HOMESTEAD

by Marguerite St. Leon Loud,
from
American Female Poets
by Caroline May c. 1869

There is a lonely homestead
In a green and quiet vale,
With its tall trees sighing mournfully
To every passing gale;
There are many mansions round it,
In the sunlight gleaming fair;
But moss-grown is that ancient roof,
Its walls are grey and bare.

Where once glad voices sounded
Of children in their mirth,
No whisper breaks the solitude
By that deserted hearth.
The swallow from her dwelling
In the low eaves, hath flown;
And all night long, the whip-poor-will
Sings by the threshold stone.

No hand above the window
Ties up the trailing vines;
And through the broken casement-panes
The moon at midnight shines.
And many a solemn shadow
Seems starting from the gloom;
Like forms of long departed ones
Peopling that dim old room.

No furrow for the harvest
Is drawn upon the plain;
And in the pastures green and fair,
No herds or flocks remain.
Why is that beauteous homestead
Thus standing bare and lone?
While all the worshipp'd household gods
In dust lie overthrown.

And where are they whose voices
Rang out o'er hill and dale?
Gone; —and their mournful history
Is but an oft-told tale.
There smiles no lovelier valley
Beneath the summer sun,
Yet they who dwelt together there
Departed one by one.

Some to the quiet churchyard,
And some beyond the sea;
To meet no more, as once they met,
Beneath that old roof-tree.
Like forest-birds forsaking
Their shelt'ring native nest,
The young— to life's wild scenes went forth,
The aged —to their rest.

Fame and ambition lured them,
From that green vale to roam,
But as their dazzling dreams depart,
Regretful memories come
Of the valley, and the homestead,
Of their childhood pure and free;
Till each world-weary spirit pines,
That spot once more to see.

Oh! blest are they who linger
'Mid old familiar things,
Where every object o'er the heart
A hallow'd influence flings.
Though won are wealth and honours, —
Though reach'd fame's lofty dome, —
There are no joys like those which dwell
Within our childhood's home.

 

 

Susan Parker has shared other photos for Picture the West:

photos from the ghost town of Bodie, California

  photos from a Montana/Wyoming trip

 

Read more about Susan Parker and read some of her poetry here.

 

Visit her web site:  www.SusanParkerPoet.com

photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

 


  Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

September 2, 2008



Utah poet and rancher Paul Kern has a blog that is a model of
content and presentation. At our request, Paul kindly shared an entry from July, 2008:

I have been doing quite a bit of back-country riding into the mountains surrounding our log cabin. It is located just minutes away from the Idaho-Montana border and the continental divide.

I usually keep cattle on my place as well as horses, but have had to trim back on the cattle this year owing to my father's on-going battle with cancer. He has been my right-hand man over the years, but not now. So, we enjoy the horses. Last Friday, Dad was feeling up to a ride after two months of chemo and the subsequent recovery.

I took him up to a place we had not been before about ten miles away from the cabin as the crow flies. I won't say where because I'd like to keep it private, but it looks a whole lot like the Canadian Rockies. The trail is good for the most part, though it is a steady uphill climb from the valley floor. In the upper reaches, it gets rocky, steep and slick. You need good sure footed horses experienced in high mountain travel to make it to the end of the trail. Our horses deliver.

I was riding my blue eyed bay, a "paint that ain't" that I broke and trained myself. He is six now and is such a prize animal. I wrote this poem when he was just a colt. Although he has thrown me a handful of times in the past, at present he is everything I ever wanted in a saddle horse—and them some. My efforts in breaking and training him have been well compensated.

By the way, Dad made the ride just fine on my half draft/half paint horse Rory and was no worse for the wear—despite the rugged country we covered.

This poem is about gifts—I will be eternally thankful to my father for the gift of horsemanship he so freely gave me. The top photo is of me and my blue-eyed bay at trails end last Friday. Target is wearing my favorite hand made slick-fork saddle.
 

My Blue Eyed Bay

We did some horse tradin' just after the molt,
Kirby got old Dan and me
an unbroke colt,
When I first handled him he lingered to stay,
This was a real good sign for the blue eyed bay.

Still only a yearlin' he wasn't much use,
I just wanted a horse that'd had no abuse,
To get one I'd have to break him my way,
We'd get along fine, me and this blue eyed bay.

Months of workin' him and sackin' him out,
One step at a time each day left no doubt,
He was a good one and had a good place to stay,
I was startin' out fine with my blue eyed bay.

It took five bouts of buckin' 'fore I hit dirt,
When he finally threw me just my pride was hurt,
That was the last time he'd toss a rider away,
It all came together for my blue eyed bay.

Months passed, he grew and he learned each gait,
But to lope with a rider he preferred to wait,
It would come out in time but in his own way,
He was movin' out fast now
my blue eyed bay.

He loped first on the trail on an uphill swell,
That November mornin' it was clear as a bell,
There was more to come I could easily say,
I'd be gettin' there soon with my blue eyed bay.

A horse worth ownin' has to give satisfaction,
A good head, soft eye and a whole lot of action,
You can get all this if you're willing to pay,
Most horses keep a' givin' like my blue eyed bay.

One holiday mornin' in the soft arena dirt,
A loose rein, no spurs and no need for a quirt,
He picked up his leads and loped circles each way,
This, a true gift from my blue eyed bay.

Now in that same spirit at any time of the year,
True gifts are those given in love without fear,
They come from the heart and in their own way,
So, here's to you
from me and my blue eyed bay!

© 2008, Paul Kern 
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

 

Paul Kern has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

 

Photos in a tribute to Utah rancher Joe Mascaro 

Contemporary photos for Father's Day, 2007

  Vintage photos of his grandfather



 

Read more about Paul Kern, see some of his photos, and read some of his poetry here.

Visit his blog at www.PaulKern.com.

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


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Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See past weeks' photos starting with the most recent, here.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

 

 

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