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This is Page 33.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


 

August 25, 2008


previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


 

South Dakota rancher, poet and writer Robert Dennis shared photos of his mares and colts. He told us:

The mares are some I have put together for the sole purpose of raising me some good, cowy horses. Chance, my youngest son, was breaking horses for the public and bemoaning the fact that he never had a steady enough source of horses to make a living training them. So I put together a few mares with bloodlines that I like and started raising colts, so I would have good horses to ride and Chance would have colt to train.


Jam and her filly


Susy and her filly


Peaches and her filly

Now that I have the mares, a well bred stud and colts, Chance has decided he doesn't want to train horses. Just my luck, this all coincided with the drop in prices in the horse market. Any body want some well bred fillies, cheap?

Here's a photo of Chance from a branding this Spring, which will also be included in a future Picture the West entry from Robert Dennis:


Chance on Robert's horse, Beaver

 

Robert Dennis has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West, including:

Family photos from the 1920s and 1940s

Photos and stories from his ranch and Red Owl

Area photos from the early 1900s

rdfatheruncles.jpg (54358 bytes) Family photos from the 1920s


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski

Read more about Robert Dennis and read some of his poetry here.

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

August 18, 2008

The Ranching Way of Life is an impressive documentary created by Colorado rancher and poet Peggy Godfrey and ScSeed, a local non-profit grassroots organization, with support from the Colorado Council on the Arts and other organizations.


image by Peter Schlegel  

Written and narrated by Peggy Godfrey, the captivating and informative film was four years in making. It presents the rancher's world, season-by-season, giving a close-up, thoughtful look at the work, risks, and rewards of ranching life in the rugged and beautiful San Luis Valley. The film includes commentaries by area ranchers and impressive still and film footage, including extraordinary calving scenes. Poetry by Peggy Godfrey and others and music appear, naturally, throughout the film.  Footage that includes this image is accompanied by Peggy Godfrey's "Country Graft":


image by Peggy Godfrey


Country Graft

Babies needing Mamas or the longing for a child
It happens here in Moffat, it happens in the wild.

Animal adoption on a ranch is called a graft
There's not a baby shower for the little lamb or calf.

For the best in bovine chemistry, take a cow whose calf has died
If she stands around and moos, you skin the little hide.

Then take an orphan baby or a lonesome starving tyke
You drape the skin and tie it snug, so the calves will smell alike.

I've hung black skins on red calves, a tiny red skin on a tan
Hereford's red and white on black, you do the best you can.

Some legs fit through like jackets, and I tie with baling twine
Those orange knots hanging front and back on this bovine Frankenstein.

The cow sniffs out this critter sporting funny wisps of twine
That little hide will help decide both futures on the line.

Sometimes it won't seem worth it, 'cause this grafting makes a mess
But when those mother instincts win, it's mighty sweet success.

The mother gets a grateful child, the baby gets a mother
And this rancher won't have to bottle-feed, unless she gets another.

© Peggy Godfrey
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


The DVD includes supplemental themed short features with additional engaging commentary by local ranch people on topics including "Neighbors," "Ethics," "Branding," "Stories" and a "Message for Youth." A shortened "youth version" of the documentary is also included. 


image by Peggy Godfrey

 

From the film's official description:

The film is a cultural heritage and occupational arts project that captures seasonal ranching activities, stories, poems, interviews, and music that celebrate ranching...

Those featured in the documentary are long-time residents of the San Luis Valley. Some represent families who have lived here for more than 100 years. Their arts include storytelling, music, poetry, lyrics and jokes that flow from this ranching way of life. Their arts also include the occupational activities of haying, branding, calving, cattle driving, shearing, and irrigating. Hunting, trapping, antler/bone carving, woodcarving, tanning hides, rawhide braiding and leather work are also artistic skills enjoyed by and useful to ranchers. Ranches are scattered across the vast 30 mile wide and 100-mile long valley and into the side canyons of the San Juan and Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

A total of 37 individuals have been filmed...The agricultural lifestyle, ranching traditions, family farms—all are intrinsic to the heritage of Colorado and all are threatened in today's economy. The threat of exportation of water to urban areas, the power of large agri-business to take control of markets, the drain of traditional knowledge as youth migrate to urban centers: these are a few of the reasons that ranching is becoming an art to be preserved and shared....

The Ranching Way of Life video project addresses the community building, cooperative enterprise, and protection of community character and rural lifestyle that ScSEED aims to foster.


image by Peggy Godfrey

 

 

 See additional stills from the film at the ScSeed web site.

The Ranching Way of Life is available for $11 postpaid from
ScSEED, P. O. Box 393, Moffat CO 81143; www.scseed.org.

 

Photo by Erin Smith

Read some of Peggy Godfrey's poetry and more about her in our feature here.

 

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


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Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See past weeks' photos starting with the most recent, here.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

 

 

 

 

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