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This is Page 30.

See some past weeks' photos below.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


July 14, 2008


previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


 

Poet and rancher Diane Tribitt shares recent photos from her ranch. She told us:

Our friend, Dale, brought this buckskin to our pasture to help gather yearlings, putting rides on it for someone. Although the gelding took a great photo, I heard he wasn't very pretty "in the field." Guess Dale's got few quirks to ride outta him yet! I shot this photo between two rails of a corral panel, couldn't help but admire how fine he looked just standin' there:
 

Here's another one from the day's gathering. This is Dale's son, Jeremy.  Dale is the guy putting rides on the pretty buckskin gelding:
 

Diane Tribitt has shared other photos for Picture the West:

  October 8, 2007

  May 28, 2007

dtnewborncalf468.jpg (24243 bytes)  December 25, 2007

Read more about Diane Tribitt and read some of her poetry here.

Dianetribitt2007.jpg (18039 bytes)

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

July 7, 2008

California poet and writer Susan Parker shares pictures of Bodie, California.

She writes:

Bodie, California is not on the way to anywhere. In fact, you have to go out of the way to get there. Located approximately 22 miles from Bridgeport, California and seven miles from the Nevada border, the last three miles into what remains of the former gold and silver mining town is an unpaved, narrow, dusty, switchback, “wash-board bumpy” road. Narrowly missing other cars that passed, all the while praying I wouldn’t tumble over the edge with the crumbling shoulder, I drove to the hill overlooking the once thriving, somewhat sinful, town.

I have always loved the romance of the old west, being particularly intrigued by its ghost towns. I like to imagine what life would have been like had I lived back then. Expecting to be immersed in the lonely spirits that continue to cling to their former existence, I was disappointed to see so many other folks had the same idea.

In German and Japanese, I heard tourists relating to their companions the stories and history of this town as printed in the booklet available at the visitor’s parking lot, well worth the honor-system donation of $2.00. I could see by the glaze in their staring eyes that they too had traveled through time back to the 1880s.

While dodging other camera-toting tourists, I clicked away with my new digital camera. My husband took his own set of photos, because we have learned that one of us will always find “that perfect picture.” As it turned out, I inadvertently deleted each photo every time I took a new one. (Next time I will practice before I leave the house!) So enjoy his photos and a bit of history about one of California’s most widely visited state historic parks.


Residence

 


Swazey Hotel


Fire House


Restored truck

Susan continues:

The following is excerpted from the booklet distributed by the Bodie State Historic Park:

“And now my comrades all are gone;
Naught remains to toast.
They have left me here in my misery,
Like some poor wandering ghost.”
                                                  
Unknown


Bodie was named after Waterman S. Body (also known as William S. Bodey), who discovered gold here in 1859. The change in spelling of the town’s name has often been attributed to an illiterate sign painter, but it was a deliberate change by the citizenry to ensure proper pronunciation.

Only about five percent of the buildings [from] its 1880s heyday still remain. Today, it stands just as time, fire and the elements have left it—a genuine California gold mining ghost town. Designated a state historic park in 1962, it is now maintained in a state of “arrested decay.”

The town of Bodie rose to prominence with the decline of mining along the western slope of the Sierra Nevada. Prospectors crossing the eastern slope in 1859 to “see the elephant”—that is, to search for gold—made a rich discovery at Virginia City. This huge gold strike, later to be known as the Comstock Lode, started a wild rush to the surrounding high desert country. [Bodie sits at an elevation of 8,375.]

By 1879 Bodie boasted a population of about 10,000 and was second to none for wickedness, badmen and “the worst climate out of doors.”

Killings occurred with monotonous regularity, sometimes becoming almost daily events. The fire bell, which tolled the ages of the deceased when they were buried, rang often and long. Robberies, stage holdups and street fights provided variety, and the town of 65 saloons offered many opportunities for relaxation after hard days of work in the mines. The Reverend F.M. Warrington saw it in 1881 as “a sea of sin, lashed by the tempest of lust and passion.”

Bad men, like bad whiskey and bad climate, were endemic to the area. Whatever the case, the streets are quiet now. Bodie still has its wicked climate, but with the possible exception of an occasional ghostly visitor, its badmen are all in their graves.


Learn more about Bodie at the California State Parks' web site and at a site devoted to Bodie.

  Susan Parker previously shared photos from a Montana/Wyoming trip

 

Read more about Susan Parker and read some of her poetry here.

 

Visit her web site:  www.SusanParkerPoet.com

photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.



Special Fourth of July photo, 2008

Journalist and photographer Jeri Dobrowski shares a vintage Fourth of July photo:


July 4, 1940:  Campbell Ranch on Powder River
Located on the east bank, approximately half way between Powderville and
Locate, Custer County, Montana

 

Jeri writes:

It was tradition that the Campbells hosted an Independence Day celebration, inviting family and neighbors from up and down the river. It wasn't unusual to have 40-50 people for the day.

(A note on the back in my grandmothers handwriting reads: "Orvel always hung the flag") While the flag hanging from a cottonwood branch appears to be backwards, it's simply a case of being photographed from behind. It was hung so visitors would see it when they drove into the yard from the east. (Notice the oak rocker that was hauled outdoors to accommodate guests. Temporary tables made from sawhorses and planks, and covered with oil cloth, were set up underneath the trees.)

Orvel Campbell (back row, in front of tree trunk) was my maternal grandfather. Also among those gathered that day were my maternal grandmother Lucille Campbell (in front of Orvel, to his right), my mother Alice Campbell (front row, fourth from left), great grandfather Vinton Wildman (behind Lucille, to her immediate right), great grandmother Eva Campbell (seated, far left), great grandmother Suzie Wildman (seated, fourth from left), uncle Kenneth Campbell (small boy standing in front of Suzie), along with assorted great aunts, great uncles, cousins, and neighbors.

For entertainment, there were horseshoes, baseball, and music. Orvel played the banjo. Others would bring accordions, fiddles and guitars.

Orvel was famous for his ice cream, which he would crank by hand for special occasions, such as the annual 4th of July gathering. Watermelon was another "must have" item. As a child I remember huge slices of watermelon served up in a wheelbarrow. The first time I saw that, I couldn't believe my eyes!

 

Jeri Dobrowski has contributed many other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

  Photos and stories from the early 1900s in Coalwood, Montana, where her great grandfather John W. Janssen was postmaster and proprietor of the general store

  Photos about her grandfather and "all the things he ever rode..."
 

Family photos of generations of veterans and some additional World War I photos

Family photos from Yellowstone, from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s

Contemporary photos for the Fourth of July

  1940s-era photos about McNierney Livestock

Jeri  is working on a family history book of photos and stories. She comments, "'Picture the West' has inspired me to find out more about my family...What a way to view history and incorporate the written accounts that I am so fortunate to have!"
 

Jld07.jpg (9383 bytes) 

Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.

See her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


June 30, 2008

 

  Arizona photographer Lori Faith Merritt (www.PhotographyByFaith.com) shared photos of mustangs. She told us:

I am going back to South Dakota toward the end of July to photograph the mustangs of the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros.

The mustangs at this conservancy are very special, being herds that otherwise were slated for eradication by the BLM and herds that are allowed to live wild to allow study of mustang behaviors.


Lori Faith Merritt, www.PhotographyByFaith.com
 


Lori Faith Merritt, www.PhotographyByFaith.com
 


Lori Faith Merritt, www.PhotographyByFaith.com
 


Lori Faith Merritt, www.PhotographyByFaith.com
 

You can learn more about the conservancy at www.ispmb.org. I will be working to create images of these mustangs to help the conservancy that Wild Horse Annie started.

She adds:

Please contact me at bluehorseranch@theriver.com by July 14th, 2008 if you might be able to help sponsor my trip or contribute to the International Society for the Protection of Mustangs and Burros
 

 

 


photo of Lori Faith Merritt by Jeri L. Dobrowski;
see Jeri Dobrowksi's gallery of western performers and others here.

 

See more of Lori Faith Merritt's mustang photos at her web site: www.PhotographyByFaith.com

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

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Tell us your stories!  If you have a photo to share, email us.

See past weeks' photos starting with the most recent, on page 30.

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

 


 

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