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This is Page 22.

See some past weeks' photos below

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


 

March 24, 2008

 


previous weeks' photos

index of all photos


 

Texas poet Doc Wood shared the following photos. He told us:

These photos were taken at Copper Breaks State Park in northwest Texas on October 12-13, 2007. . Copper Breaks State Park consists of 1898.8 acres, 12 miles south of Quanah or 9 miles north of Crowell, in Hardeman County.

Prior to the arrival of early settlers, this region was the realm of the Comanche and Kiowa tribes. It remained so until the pressures of a new civilization forced the Indians onto reservations in nearby Oklahoma. Copper Breaks is also the home to a portion of the official Texas State Longhorn Herd.


 

As one can see in this photo, there are some magnificent sunsets from atop "the Breaks."


 

Doc Wood adds:

This will be the first year for cowboy poetry at Copper Breaks and will kick off with a B-B-Q cookoff for the April opening on April 12th. Performances will be on the 2nd Saturday nights of April, May, June, September and October and will be done at the Big Pond Overlook beginning at sundown. I will be presenting a program of cowboy poetry. The rustic beauty of the park provides a natural setting for the cowboy poetry program.

Find more about Copper Breaks State Park here and find the calendar of events here.



Read more about Doc Wood and his poetry here.

 

 


 Please share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


March 17, 2008

 

South Dakota rancher, poet and writer Robert Dennis shared family photos, one from about 1924 and one from the 1940s. As his web site tells, "Our ranch was started at the turn of the century by Henry Dennis and his sons, Edward and Walter. Robert and Cindy are the 4th generation of Dennis' to live here. Our children—Tyler; Tate and Kass and their son Gabe; and Chance and Hope and their son Gus—are the fifth and sixth generation, respectively."  He told us about the photos:

This photo is of Walter and Lizzy Dennis taken on their ranch that Walter had homesteaded at the turn of the century. This would have been taken in the 1940s. Note the gun in the scabbard on the horse, Walter's 25-20 Winchester that he packed all the time. When he wasn't carrying this gun he was carrying his 12-gauge Winchester shotgun. He very seldom missed with either and the family ate lots of wild meat that he shot.

The saddle belonged to their son Roy, who was not living on the ranch and was working away from home at the time the picture was taken.


 

This photo is Roy Dennis, middle son of Walter and Lizzy. He is on his Indian pony, Silver. He would have been about 10 years old at the time,  so this photo would have been taken about 1924.  Notice that he is carrying his father's 25-20 rifle.

Also notice the loose rein on the horse. Roy is wearing a good looking hat and the common bib overalls. He looks to have a heavy coat or slicker tied on  the back of the saddle. If we could see better we would see that Roy is wearing lace up shoes and not boots, as was common.

Both photo's show the old raggy grass ropes that were what everyone had and used. In the background you can see the barn with a "cupelo" on top  that was made with windows all along both sides to provide light. Roy said they always leaked when it rained, so they eventually took them  out.

In the distance  behind Roy and the horse you can see cottonwood trees from a neighbor's claim. Walter bought it in time and quite a few others that joined his ranch, when the owners couldn't make a  living any longer and left the country in the "dirty 30s."

At about the time when this photo was taken, Roy was bucked off a horse about 3 miles from home. He landed on the back of his neck. They somehow packed him home and his mother made a pallet by the stove and nursed him for about 3 weeks before he was able to get up and around and eventually got over it. Years later, when he was 
getting an exam at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, they found that he had broken his neck at some time, years before. Roy said it had to have been when he was bucked off at that time,  as that was the only time he ever hurt his neck.

They were tough in them days!
 

Robert Dennis has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West, including:

Ranch photos and stories about his ranch and the town of Red Owl

Area photos from the early 1900s

Family photos from the 1920s

Robert Dennis appears on the Heritage of the American West show on March 19, 2008 (listen live on the web at 7PM Mountain time).

You can read more about Robert Dennis and read some of his poetry here.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski


 

March 10, 2008


Wyoming singer and songwriter Laurie Wood shared these photos, including those of her daughter, poet and musician Cora Wood. She told us:

The following pictures were taken in June of 2007 on the John E. Rouse/Colorado State University Beef Improvement Center near Encampment, Wyoming.

My husband, Duane Wood tends the herd of 400+ Purebred Angus and registered Red Angus cows.  The photographer is Justin Dunn, a college student from California State University-Chico who interned here last summer. 

When there is cow work to be done, my six year old daughter Cora is usually the first one to the barn, ready to saddle up and ride.

Above, is Cora helping bring in the yearling heifers for the early ultrasound.  Dad told her to keep it slow let them graze a little along the way.  The entire herd is AI bred, then later turned in with clean-up bulls.
Cows are preg checked twice; once in June and again in the fall. 

  

This is a genuinely happy child, because a day spent horseback with Dad is a grand day indeed.  Notice the barn in the background-circa 1920s.

 


photo by Natasha Wheeler

 

Read more about Cora Wood and some of her poetry here.

 


 Please share your photos.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

March 3, 2008

 

Poet and writer Jean Mathisen Haugen of Lander, Wyoming, shared photos of Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander. She told us:

A flintnapper is a person who has learned to chip out arrowheads, spearheads, scrapers and so on like the Indians once did.  Tom Lucas lived  on the Wind River Reservation for many years and basically taught himself how to do it and he is very good at it too; he has also taught himself how to make sheep horn bows like the Sheepeater Indians once made from mountain sheep horn (they were highly prized back in the days of the trappers and Indians in the early 19th century).  

These of some of Tom's blade knives he's chipped out:

He has appeared on some PBS TV shows and is currently putting on a 10-week show of his western and Indian art in Scottsdale, Arizona; he also does beadwork. 

Jean has an article about Tom Lucas in the February, 2008 issue of Open Range Magazine.

See Tom Lucas' blog for more about his Arizona art show experiences.

 

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other photos and stories, including:

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some additional family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.
 

 


 Please share your photos.

Send your views of the West.

We need your photos. If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going by sharing your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

February  25, 2008

 

Matt Whitt shares impressive views from in and around Thermopolis, Wyoming. He told us:

I was born and raised in Thermopolis, have always felt a strong connection to the land and found photography to be the best way to express this connection.


Taken at daybreak in the buffalo pasture of Hot Springs State Park, Thermopolis, Wyoming, November 11, 2007

I'm most always out at sunrise and sunset when the light is best, like most shots, this one I just happened to be in the right place at the right time.


 


Taken west of Thermopolis, January 9th, 2008

I liked the way the sunrise light colors the grass seemed like a moment frozen in time and going on forever. A friend of mine edited out a bunch of towers on top of the hill in the back ground.


 


Taken near Thermopolis, January 9th, 2008

I thought the natural colors were great.
 

Matt Whitt works as a contractor in Thermopolis.

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If you have a photo to share, email us.


Share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


 

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 


 

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