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This is Page 15.

See some past weeks' photos below

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


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If you have a photo to share, email us.


 

September 24,  2007

 

Poet, writer, reporter, and gathering organizer Smoke Wade, who divides his time between Idaho and Nevada, shared photos from Bodie, a California gold mining ghost town, which once had a population of 10,000.


 

He writes:

Though this was not my first visit to Bodie, I was most impressed by taking time to reflect on Green Street, the main east/west street that intersects Main Street. The Methodist Church is on Green Street as well as the JS Cain Home.


Methodist Church
 


JS Cain Home


Green Street

I have included my thoughts on Green Street.
 

 Ghost Town

Green Street is watchful
From it's place by the hill.
Alone at night,
Quiet in winter,
It stands a forgotten post;
Weary,
Like those who once
Passed along its way.

©  2007, Smoke Wade 
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 


Barber Shop

 


The Standard Mine


 

Read more about Bodie at www.Bodie.com and at the California State Park's web site. Bodie is a State Historic Park and a National Historic site. Bodie is located near Yosemite National Park, at an elevation of 8375 feet.

 

Previously, Smoke share a circa 1915 photo of his grandfather, J. H. "Jidge" Tippett, taken at the Tippett home ranch on Joseph Creek in Asotin Country, Washington, and other photos of the area, which you can see here.)

Read some of Smoke Wade's poetry here.


 

September 17, 2007

Photographer and journalist Jeri Dobrowski shared family photos from Yellowstone, from the 1930s, 1940s, and 1950s.  She told us:

Listening to the 16 finalists in the Western Folklife Center's Yellowstone Teton Song Writing Contest brought back a lot of great memories of times spent in and around Yellowstone Park as a child. Living in eastern Montana, and having numerous relatives in the western part of the state, our family made several trips through the park. It wasn't a once-in-a-lifetime kinda deal like it is for some people.
Looking through vintage photo albums reveals a long-standing affinity for Yellowstone by my grandparents, on both sides. That's probably why my folks loved the park so and took us kids there. 
Just so you know, in our family, West Yellowstone is as much a part of the park as any of the natural features. If you went through the park, you had to go to West Yellowstone too. We'd stay in a cabin or motel there, but finding one during peak season could be a challenge. (This was in a time before toll-free numbers and reservation services.) Driving from office to office, inquiring about lodging, was part of the adventure. Hence, the inclusion of West Yellowstone photos in this selection.

 
Circa 1934: Vacation from Powder River County, Montana, to Yellowstone Park. Hallie Janssen, my paternal grandmother, in back of family's 1929 Chevy truck. Granddad Bill converted it from a mercantile delivery vehicle to a camper for the adventure.

Imagine driving across the state of Montana in that rig with three boys—before modern highways, let alone the interstate rest areas, air conditioning, and convenience stores.

 

 
 
Taken on the same trip, that's Grandma Hallie (in the light colored dress) standing on the observation deck in the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. The two boys wearing the jaunty caps are her sons.
 


 

 
Granddad Bill in waders with the catch of the day. You know what they had for supper that night. Notice the two poles in the back of the truck, along with one of the boys' caps. He wasn't the only one fishing.

 

 

 
 
Granddad Bill "fishing" in a posted stream on a later trip, maybe. Maybe not.

He was such a ham in front of a camera, I seriously doubt that he was fishing. BUT, his love for photography was equaled by that of fishing. You never know ... 
 


 

 
This photo, taken at a West Yellowstone photo concession, is of my mother, Alice Campbell. Taken in 1946, she was vacationing in the park with her family. (She and my father married in 1953.)

Too bad the photographer didn't make sure the bronc rein was on the right side of the horse's neck. It would have made for a more realistic shot.
 


 

 
Labeled "In Yellowstone Park" on the back in my maternal grandmother's hand, this photo tells the story of a time now gone. Today you're warned not to feed the bears, to stay away from them. Fifty years ago, begging bears were as much a part of the scenery as the bubbling mud pots and Old Faithful. They'd come up to car windows and mooch whatever road food tourists would share.  

 

 

1952: That's my dad, John Janssen's, Cadillac fueling up at the Union 76 station in West Yellowstone. This was taken on the way back from a trip to Albuquerque, New Mexico, and California. Dad's friend, Bob Rask, represented Montana State College at an intercollegiate rodeo convention, and they took Dad's car. On the way back, they made a swing through California and took in the Tournament of Roses Parade.

Dad and Bob were plenty happy to see West Yellowstone. They had spent the night in the car, the road blocked by a truck stuck on a hill between Ashton, Idaho and West Yellowstone. It was a long, cold night.

 

We look forward to more photos from Jeri Dobrowski, who is working on a family history book of photos and stories. She comments, "'Picture the West' has inspired me to find out more about my family...What a way to view history and incorporate the written accounts that I am so fortunate to have!"
 

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Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.

See her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

 

 

 


Share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


 

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

 


 

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