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This is Page 145.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos



index of all photos

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 


 

December 2, 2015

 

New Mexico cowboy, songwriter, poet, entertainer, and photographer Mike Moutoux shares pictures from a branding this fall. He writes:

The Huston's run a Corriente cattle operation in northern New Mexico and have a lot of pride in their breed. These small cattle came to this county in the late 15th century and were almost lost through cross-breeding but are enjoying a new appreciation as easy keepers; as rodeo stock; and as a lean meat breed.

The country is pretty open and sure was easy to work compared to other places I've worked. The Huston's are big on tradition and only use horses to work cattle. They don't even own a 4-wheeler. My kind of folks.
 


© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use
 

 


© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use

 


© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use

 


© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use

 


© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use



© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use



© 2015, Mike Moutoux, mikemoutoux.com; please request permission for use

 


 

Mike Moutoux has also contributed other photos to Picture the West, including:
 

  New Mexico's Gila National Forest

  Javelinas

Gathering cattle in the Pecos Wilderness

  The "old guy" cowboying story and photos

New Mexico Centennial Cattle Drive

Cowboying in the Pecos Wilderness in northern New Mexico

  The New Mexico range where he works, near Silver City




Find some of Mike Moutoux's poetry and lyrics
 and more about him here and at his web site.

 

 

 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

November 3,  2015

 

 

Fifth-generation rancher, poet, and writer Deanna Dickinson McCall and her husband Dave spend a lot of time maintaining the water for their remote New Mexico ranch.

 

We asked her to tell us about the intricacies and generalities of their pipeline and to share a few photos. She wrote:

Water distribution for livestock and wildlife on ranches often entail piping water miles from its source. Sources can be a well, spring or even a reservoir. The system usually involves various places where water can delivered to tanks, troughs or ponds, versus providing water at only one location. A single pipeline may supply water to many areas. The line may be buried underground or placed above ground, depending upon conditions. Water distribution is one of the great aids in range management, by controlling where water is available grazing is also controlled. The systems in use today open areas for both livestock and wildlife that was not previously utilized due to water being too far away for the animals to stay in that area.
 


The beginning of a 9-mile long water system.


The pipeline on our Lincoln Forest allotment is approximately 14 miles long. The source of this water is Monument Spring. The pipeline is 11/4 inch black plastic pipe strung on the ground over the mountains, going up and down canyons in very rugged terrain that in many places cannot even be accessed horseback and require hiking to maintain. Valves are placed at fiberglass or metal holding tanks with water troughs, dirt tanks, and various other facilities that allow access to water for all animals.

Grazing is also controlled by these watering spots, by turning off water in one area, stock will move to where water is available. This is bear country and bears often raise havoc with our system by biting the pipeline, sometimes in two, and after drinking throwing the pipeline down a canyon where we must retrieve it. Hunters and other outdoor enthusiasts turn valves, and cause issues periodically, as well. The latest issue we have had is actual theft of large pieces of this line. Maintenance of these sort of lines is labor intensive enough without having the public (and bears) interfere.

The pipeline enables both our livestock and many species of wildlife to utilize areas otherwise unusable, often bringing wildlife in that wasn't previously seen in those areas. Water is even more important in today's West as a precious resource.
 


Working on another leak
 

Deanna commented, "These photos are of the tin rain catchment system we did as a joint project with Forest Service and Fish and Game....I prefer the tin, easy to replace if need be. Melts the snow quickly, too. Fencing to keep everything off is critical."


Low maintenance, this is made with tin so won't wear out, but does have to be screwed back down occasionally after strong winds. This was in place before we came 8 years ago, we've added storage and some fencing.




 Storage from the tin mat that gathers rain and snow. It is directed into these tanks for storage, then to drinkers for cattle and elk.


She also included additional photos:


A Jensen Jack, a form of pump similar to an oil pump and well.


A storage tank that is fed by a pipeline, then is fed to a drinking trough.


The last shows a dirt tank, these can be fed by pipelines or just capture rain water

 


 

Deanna Dickinson McCall has also contributed other photos to Picture the West, including:
 

  Ranch cowpups
 

 Photos from the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico

  The drought, July 2011

   Family photos from the early 1900s

dmpp.jpg (22046 bytes)  Marshall and Texas Ranger special agent Perry Preston ("P.P.") Dickinson, c. 1912

 


[photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller]

Find some of Deanna Dickinson McCall's poetry
 and more about her here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

September 21,  2015

 

Janet Gingold created The LaVonne Houlton Compendium: Ponies, Poetry and Prose, delving deeply into research and into friendship to bring forth an outstanding book about award-winning California poet, writer and noted Morgan Horse breeder and historian LaVonne Houlton (1925-2009). The book is of a quality and depth that would please LaVonne, the epitome of both values in her work and her life.

LaVonne Houlton was a poet since childhood, and she raised and showed registered Morgan Horses for 35 years. She wrote articles for many magazines and wrote a regular column for Piggin’ String magazine, which sometimes included her cartoons.

Her ranching relatives in the Dakotas helped develop her love of horses, cattle, and the characters of the West. Her biography here at CowboyPoetry.com, where she was a valued contributor, tells that during her teenage years, “There were Herefords and horses, dreams to dream, and many trails to follow. And in the evenings there were the stacks of Western Livestock Journals, with poems by Bruce Kiskaddon and ‘Cowpoke Cartoons’ by Ace Reid with which to while away a few hours.” The reader finds all of those influences in her writing.

Gingold worked with Houlton to collect her writings and continued with the project after Houlton’s death. The book’s acknowledgments and bibliography show the great breadth of research on which the book stands. The lavishly illustrated volume, years in the making, is an impressive tribute to a woman and a way of life.

The book is illustrated with more than 75 photographs, which are also included on an accompanying CD. Find more about the book here.

Here is a sampling of some of the photographs:

 


© 2015, The LaVonne Houlton Compendium; request permission for any use
Bonnie Sue and Miss President Morgan, 1942

 


© 2015, The LaVonne Houlton Compendium; request permission for any use
Headlight Morgan, who lived to be almost 33 and sired nearly 200 registered Morgans
 



© 2015, The LaVonne Houlton Compendium; request permission for any use
Galyn Blackburn on Roxanne Rose and Ern Pedler on Mary Mels Dingo (aka Adios); this photo appeared on the cover of
The Morgan Horse magazine, August 1987.  See LaVonne Houlton's poem about Ern Pedler and more about him here.




© 2015, The LaVonne Houlton Compendium; request permission for any use
A band of Morgan mares owned by Roland Hill; William Randolph Hearst bought dozens of mares from Hill
 



© 2015, The LaVonne Houlton Compendium; request permission for any use
LaVonne Houlton and Viking Captor

 

 

 

Find more about LaVonne Houlton and some of her poetry here.

 

 



Find an index of all of the many past photos here.

 

 

See the most recent past photos, starting on page 1

 

 

 

 

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