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This is Page 141.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos



index of all photos

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 


 

 

October 17, 2014


© 2013, Action Agency Austria

Austrian documentary filmmaker Herbert Krill shares photos from his outstanding film, Song of the Cowboy: An American Icon Between Yesterday and Tomorrow.

(The film airs on 3sat TV in Germany on October 18, 2014. The film is available on streaming video for seven days, through October 25, 2014. The brief narration is in German, but much of the film is in English. Watch here.)

Song of the Cowboy captures the spirit of the Western Folklife Center's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, and, with stunning photography, explores the work and lives of musicians Gail Steiger, Wylie Gustafson, and Kristyn Harris, and of poet Henry Real Bird.
 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Wylie Gustafson
 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Gail Steiger
 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Henry Real Bird
 


© 2013,Herbert Krill
Kristyn Harris
 

The film opens with poet and picker DW Groethe singing "Git Along Little Dogies" in front of the Western Folklife Center in Elko, Nevada, during the gathering.
 


© 2013, Herb Krill
DW Groethe

There are clips of Ian Tyson, Waddie Mitchell, Stephanie Davis, Trinity Seely, Glenn Ohrlin, Paul Zarzyski and lively scenes from the event.

The heart of the film is in its visits, through a year's seasons, to the ranches where Gail Steiger, Wylie Gustafson, and Henry Real Bird live and work, and in scenes in the Dallas/Ft. Worth area with Krystin Harris. Folklorist David Stanley appears throughout, adding historical and social background.
 


© 2013,Herbert Krill
Wylie Gustafson's horse works his jacket zipper



© 2013,Herbert Krill
The crew with Wylie Gustafson
 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Gail Steiger

 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Devon Dawson with Kristyn Harris
 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Kristyn Harris



Herbert Krill comments on the film:

I have filmed a lot in the U.S., but this was special. It was very much outdoors, in the middle of summer and in the dead of winter, on the Montana Hi-Line, on the Crow Reservation, at the Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, on the Spider Ranch near Prescott, Arizona, and in the Dallas/Ft.Worth area. There were airports, rental cars, and lots of driving, but mostly we were out in nature, immersed in a different kind of lifestyle, far from our usual habitat, close to the ground, among cattle, horses, and cowboys. We filmed SONG OF THE COWBOY in seventeen days, not counting travel. The crew came from Hamburg and Berlin, I arrived from Livingston, Montana, where I had visited friends. And for the second trip, I came straight from Vienna, Austria.

What impressed me a lot: the small town of Conrad, Montana, not far from the Canadian border. This is where Wylie Gustafson grew up and lives now again. Where nothing seems to be going on, and how relaxing that is. Or the beautiful buildings of the Spider Ranch, built out of concrete but comfortable, especially Gail Steiger's house and the guest house where we stayed for a night. Or the cattle drive at the Ft. Worth Stockyards, performed twice a day as a reenactment for tourists, in the middle of the "Metroplex" of seven-odd million people.

And DW Groethe's friendliness, with an easy formality, a tipping of the hat, fascinating to watch over and over again in our editing room in Vienna, where such behavior hasn't been seen for a hundred years or so. Yes, in the editing room, in front of the computer screens, it was soothing to be dealing with the American West, its people, its music, and animal life. The editing process
35 dayssurely was hard work for us as usual, but therapeutic as well. The music that we constantly listened to while we were shaping our documentary had healing qualities.

 


© 2013, Action Agency Austria
Ft. Worth Stockyards


photo of Herbert Krill © 2011, Lenka Pleskotova

Herbert Krill has "spent many years in the U.S. and especially California, where he worked during twenty years as a Hollywood correspondent for Austrian and German Public TV. Among his over thirty documentary films are several about the history and culture of the U.S. He has made documentaries on Robert Altman, Robert Redford, and Tennessee Williams, as well as about Livingston, Montana."

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

 

October 6, 2014

Colorado poet, songwriter, and horsewoman Susie Knight shares photos, their story, and a poem.

Ernie Snare is a rancher born and raised in Florissant, Colorado. His homestead borders the Florissant Fossil Beds National Monument. To date, he is 83 years young and still in the cattle business. His father built the log cabin he lives in. It's like a museum with so many artifacts and collectibles from the olden days.

In 2009, I was in the right place and the right time to ride for him a few times when he was moving his mother cows and calves from one pasture to another in the Tarryall Reservoir area in Park County, Colorado where Ernie leased pasture during the summers. He gave me his 20-year old gelding, Frosty, to ride. He was an outstanding horse...once you were on him. But, on the ground, he was a beast. From threatening to bite as he was groomed and saddled to almost flipping over backward when I'd mount, Frosty made every attempt to not have to go back to work. Ernie hassled me plenty when I'd lunge Frosty before I'd get on him, but I figured his teasing was much less painful than a wreck with Frosty.

I still see Ernie and Carolyn when I go back to Florissant from time to time. But, Frosty is retired, and Ernie has other folks nearby to help him out when he needs a hand. I look back on the summer and fall of 2009 with great fondness of the times I rode for Ernie Snare.

 


photo by Alan Caldwell
Ernie Snare's old gelding, Frosty, and me. Late summer 2009

 


Ernie Snare's cattle. Late summer 2009

 


Ernie was 78 years young here...in 2009. He's still going strong today!




Here's Ernie Snare and Miss Carolyn on one of many cattle drives.


 

Ernie Snare

I'll have to wake up early; tomorrow is the day.
His ranch is south of Florissant, and that’s two hours away.

But, I’ll get to ride his gray horse. He’s the best one anywhere.
Yep, tomorrow is the day that I’ll ride for Ernie Snare.

I met him several years ago when I was passin’ through,
there at the Grange on Thursdays where the local folks all knew

that the pot luck always satisfied, and the music’s mighty fair.
And dancin’ with Miss Carolyn was the rancher, Ernie Snare.

He wore a strip-ed western shirt, Levi’s blue and slim.
His boots were classic western-style; no square toes for him!

And on his head, he wore a hat that covered silver hair;
shorter-brimmed, uniquely creased by the hands of Ernie Snare.

I introduced myself to him and told him I could ride
in case he needed day help on his ranch, and he replied,

“Well, listen, my friend, Carolyn’s a city gal, y’know.
But she’s taken quite a likin’ to my ranch and wants to go

along with me on cattle drives, and she’s so new at this.
I’ve no time to teach her, so could you assist her, Miss?”

He didn’t have to ask me twice! I shook his leathered hand.
And so those riding lessons for Miss Carolyn began.

Petite and kinda delicate, I took it slow to start.
But this Golden Gal was love-struck, and she had a mighty heart!

I showed her how to cue her horse, to turn her on a dime,
and to stand up in the stirrups during long-trots time to time.

Day by day, she rode despite her tender derriere,
and grinnin’ behind his gooseneck was that rascal, Ernie Snare!

He nodded his approval, so we opened up the gate,
and she rode around his yard until the clock chimed half past eight!

She defied all the critics; loved his chestnut mare.
She couldn’t wait to ride beside her cowboy, Ernie Snare.

And I was mighty privileged to join ‘em as they’d ride
to move his herd of mother cows and calves ‘long mountain side.

It pleased my soul in knowin’ that I helped her ride that mare
so she could saddle up and lope along with Ernie Snare.

But the autumn wind was blowin’, and it urged me on to go
into the arms of a western man who’d love me too, and so…

I followed him to Evergreen and live a simple life
in a cabin in a canyon where I’m his lovin’ wife.

Now every day at sunset, when I’m in my rocking chair,
I tell myself, “Tomorrow, I’ll ride for Ernie Snare!”

© 2014, Susie Knight
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.


 

This poem was featured in Colorado Life magazine in July/August 2014

 


Susie Knight has shared photos previously in Picture the West:


photos from the 2012 National Western Livestock Show

 

Find more about Susie Knight and some of her poetry here at CowboyPoetry.com
and at her web site, susieknight.com.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

 

September 29, 2014

Eight generations of Wyoming poet and local historian Jean Mathisen Haugen's family have ranched in the Lander area. She shares these cabin photos and writes:

Not ghost towns, but old homestead cabins built by members of my family: one is the homestead cabin at the end of Sheep Mountain 20 miles southeast of Lander, Wyoming, built by my great uncle Gillis Mathisen around 1934:



 

Next is the homestead cabin of my great grandfather, Albert Hornecker--originally built by a trapper in the 1870s and moved to its current location about a mile west of Lander on Squaw Creek in 1884.

 

This is the homestead cabin of my great uncle Carl "Red" Mathisen, built about 1934 near Louis Miller Springs some 25 miles southeast of Lander.

 

This is the homestead cabin of my great-great uncle, Ernest Hornecker who built it in late 1872 and moved in on New Year's Day, 1873 on his ranch in the Borner's Garden area about 6 mles southwest of Lander (the cabin has been removed and is being restored at the Museum of the American West on the north end of Lander).

 

 

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other interesting photos and stories, including:

  A 105th birthday celebration, horseback

 

  Vintage Wyoming ranch photos

More vintage Wyoming family photos

 Family photos

  A vintage Lander photo

  Early Wyoming ranch life

  A photo of her great uncle's old cabin

"Great-Great Grandpa Gambled—With a Ranch and a Daughter"

A story about Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander, Wyoming

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

 

 

 

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