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This is Page 130.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

Week of October 7, 2013

 

A record-breaking, bitter storm hit parts of the Great Plains starting last Friday, taking a terrible toll on ranchers and livestock. Third-generation South Dakota cowboy Ken Cook shares some photos.

He wrote, "Cattle are scattered and have drifted all over the county ... fences buried and dead cattle are showing up in road ditches and fence lines ..."


Read an article here about the storm and its devastation, written by Francie Ganje of KBHB Radio and the Heritage of the American West Performance series.

Previously, Ken has shared other interesting Picture the West photos, including:

  Spring works

Sunup to sundown

  The fifth generation

 

  2010 branding

  The "tail end" of 2007

 Branding, 2007
 
kcFrankBucklesBabeand_Dolly.jpg (73113 bytes)  "Grandpa Buckles"

Family photos in the very first Picture the West

 


photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Read more about Ken Cook and some of his poetry here at CowboyPoetry.com.

Visit his web site, KenCookCowboyPoet.com Cowboy Culture...South Dakota Style,
and on Facebook at Passing it On.

 


 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of September 30, 2013

Dianetribitt2007.jpg (18039 bytes)

Diane Tribitt, Minnesota rancher, poet, and songwriter shares recent ranch photos. She writes that these first photos were taken  during a gather to vaccinate and castrate the calves and provided captions:


Down the dry n dusty trail.
 



Another bunch worked and headed back to he North pasture!


These cows think they are dining 5-Star right there...the pastures are pretty brown.


We also saw these two photos on her Facebook page and asked if we could include them:


One of the grandkids



Diane Tribitt
 

Diane Tribitt has shared other photos for Picture the West:

  "Cow horse"

  Ranch photos

  Wildlife in the calving pasture

  At the Little Britches rodeo

dtnewborncalf468.jpg (24243 bytes)  A Christmas photo

 

Dianetribitt2007.jpg (18039 bytes)

Read more about Diane Tribitt and read some of her poetry here.

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

Week of September 23, 2013
 


Dry Crik Journal: Perspectives from the Ranch includes entries about John and Robbin Dofflemyers' California ranch life in prose, poetry, and striking photography. We asked fifth-generation rancher and award-winning poet John Dofflemyer for permission to reprint a September 14, 2013 entry, "8544."

 


© 2013 John Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
 

After a week in Madera before and after her Mom's back surgery, Robbin wanted to see a different landscape when she got home yesterday. And having missed 20 some-odd head when I fed Paregien's on Thursday, we decided to make another pass through those cows, put out some mineral and the last of our supplement tubs while getting another count this morning.

 


© 2013 John Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com


At the Ides of September with a half-waxed moon, the calves have begun to come. This fresh one hidden, not moving a hair, doing exactly what he was told while mama came to greet us.
 


© 2013 Robbin Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
 

Portrait of a four year-old cow not too far off from having her third calf.



© 2013 Robbin Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com


Our cows are in pretty fair flesh for the moment, but as they calve they’ll lose much of their fleshy look, compounded further with having to nurse a calf. Feed and water is short after our dry spring, and though we tend to understock our pastures, we will have to keep plenty of hay in front of these cows until it rains. We’re currently feeding 25 lbs. of good alfalfa per head per week, but I suspect we will be doubling that in October. As E. J. Britten used to say, ‘You can’t starve a living out of a bunch of cows.’


Find this entry here at Dry Crik Journal.

John Dofflemyer shared a previous Dry Crik Journal post for Picture the West:


  "February Snow"

 

 


photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Find some of John Dofflemyer's poetry and more about him
here and visit drycrikjournal.com.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of September 9, 2013

It has been my habit to show an interest in folks and where they live. This interest helps them open up and share stories with me. On a recent trip north of Sliver City New Mexico, I got to visit the grave of a cowboy I had recently heard about and spent the weekend visiting and taking photos. The grave is on private property surrounded by the Gila National Forest. The area is especially pretty after summer rains have turned everything green, and the country has more history than a dozen books could hold. Ancient Indian ruins, and old mines can still be found; Geronimo was born here, Billy the Kid was here as was Butch Cassidy. The area is very rugged outside the stream valleys; it's a tough place to make a living, but folks have done it for a long time. I admire that toughness.

Charley Gentry was buried here in 1900. A fall from a horse left him paralyzed and unable to even talk. Folks that cared for him said his eyes would follow his wife whenever she was in the room. I thought about that a lot before writing the poem "Charley's Love." [Find Mike's poem, "Charley's Love," here at his web site.]
 


There are many stories to be gathered, for now let me share some of the country. The lake is Wall Lake. In the bluff above it are some Indian ruins. These would be from the Mimbres culture-they were contemporaries of the Anassazi most folks know. The Mimbres Indians were mostly in New Mexico. I think their pottery is fantastic with its geometric designs and fanciful stylized wildlife.
 


The small stream is the East Fork of the Gila. It isn't large but is always flowing. Charley's grave is a short walk from this spot. The stream supports a small amount of cattle and some horses and lots of wildlife. There are many such places in the West, but I sure like this one.
 

 

Mike has shared other photos for Picture the West:

  Javelinas

Gathering cattle in the Pecos Wilderness

  The "old guy" cowboying story and photos

New Mexico Centennial Cattle Drive

Cowboying in the Pecos Wilderness in northern New Mexico

  The New Mexico range where he works, near Silver City




Find some of Mike Moutoux's poetry and lyrics
 and more about him here and at his web site .

 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

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