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This is Page 128.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.
 

Week of August 12, 2013

 

Writer Rod Miller recently took a camera along to the Utah State High School Rodeo Finals to gather material for a magazine article. Action photography wasn’t on the agenda—instead, he hung out behind the bucking chutes to capture rodeo’s sunlight and shadows, grit and grime in unposed, candid photos. Here are a few of those images.
 


Bucking horses hold a pre-rodeo conference in the holding pen.



No, this pen of broncs is not standing at attention during the national anthem—but it looks like they might be.


Hours of waiting are about to end with eight seconds of furious action for this bull.


Bronc riders ready equipment while bucking horses wait in the background.


Well-traveled bronc saddle and gear bag.




Foreground: spur rowel. Background: the bull hide it will soon scratch.




A bull rider sets his rope as the sun sinks slowly in the west.




Find more about Rod Miller in our feature here and visit writerRodMiller.com.

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

Week of August 5, 2013

This is the fourth of a multi-part posting shared by Stan Howe, Montana singer, songwriter, musician, storyteller, writer, radio host, auctioneer, Model T authority, and fiddle expert. He writes about these photos of Galata, Montana, which is referenced in last week's Picture the West (below). As he introduced the town previously:

Galata was the little homestead town on the Great Northern Railroad about 15 miles south of where the Cavitt School and the homestead houses were. It would have been the closest connection with the outside world. It was quite a little town at one time, as most of these were, with a nice hotel, a livery stable, a big general store, blacksmith shop, specialty shops such as a harness and leather shop, confectionery, possibly a drug store and more than likely two or three churches and a couple bars.

And adds:

Most of Main Street is gone now or the businesseswhat there are lefthave moved out closer to the new highway that was built some years back that bypassed Main Street. There are a few newer houses in town and probably still 25 or so people that live there. There is a bar, a gas station, a trucking company, and so on, still in business and a couple churches as well as a school.
 


Hotel
 


The General Store and Post Office


The Hotel and Store from the back


A small store on a side street. This may have been the harness shop.



A small house in the residential section of town.


 

Legion Club, still active. This is the hall where most of the gatherings in town take place now, the occasional dance, receptions after funerals, wedding receptions and dances, and so on. The post is still active and is the center of the town's social life along with the school and the churches. It does, of course, draw all soldiers from many miles around for membership and is kept spotless and flies the American Flag every day.

Stan Howe has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West:

  Old Montana Buildings

  An old sheepwagon

  An eastern Montana homestead and hayfields

  Remnants of  eastern Montana homesteads, part 2

  Remnants of eastern Montana homesteads, part 1

Dodson, Montana's cowboy bar

  The home place, Westmore, Montana


  Spring fiddlers' show in Pony, Montana

StanBetsy1949.jpg (27787 bytes)   Photos and stories from the family ranch in Westmore, Montana

 Early eastern Montana homestead photos


 

You can contact Stan Howe: 4433 Red Fox Drive, Helena, Montana 59602, 406-443-5658, email.

Visit his site about Westmore, Montana:  www.westmoremontana.info

 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of July 29, 2013

This is the third of a multi-part posting shared by Stan Howe, Montana singer, songwriter, musician, storyteller, writer, radio host, auctioneer, Model T authority, and fiddle expert. He writes about the photos that he and Roberta Willman have shared:

This house/school is about 125 miles north of Great Falls, Montana, 15 miles north of Galata. We had an auction at a farm near there [June, 2013] and I stopped on the way back from the auction and took some photos.


The plaque (seen on the stone in the first photo) reads:

Montana History. John Marion Cavitt 1939-1916 This marks two acres deeded to Hill County School District 75 January 1912 by Civil War veteran John Cavitt. His homestead house, built in 1910 was the first classroom and Ida May Johnson the first teacher. Called Grampa Cavitt, he devoted himself to relative and neighbors. His land joined the land of son John William on the west, of nephew Benjamin Hammer on the north, of son Ora Chester's widow Lillian M Stoner and of grand nephew Frank K Hales to the south and east. Grand niece Dell Hales Scalese and grand nephew Miller Hales homesteaded to the north and west. Homesteader family names of the first children were Alfred, Alrick, Balyeat, Bergson, Bronson, Cavitt, Cockrell, Drovdahl, Forseth, Halverson, Hammer, Hanson, Henry, Hurt, Johnson, Kinyon, Munsey, Stoner, Sveum, White. Sponsored by American Legion Post 69, Galata

Galata was the little homestead town on the Great Northern Railroad about 15 miles south of where the Cavitt School and the homestead houses were. It would have been the closest connection with the outside world. It was quite a little town at one time, as most of these were, with a nice hotel, a livery stable, a big general store, blacksmith shop, specialty shops such as a harness and leather shop, confectionery, possibly a drug store and more than likely two or three churches and a couple bars.
 

This is the school that replaced the little original one. It was moved to this location about 30 years ago to protect it from the elements and people breaking in. I wasn't able to get inside to see what is in there but it appears to be in excellent condition. In the days when this was built there was a family on every half section and the school was full every year in every grade. As time went on and more and more people sold their farms to large farmers and moved away andalong with the advent of the pill in the 1960sthe school enrollment declined until it closed in the early 1970s.


 

These early homestead houses that have been preserved by the same family who saved the school. The smaller of the two is the original homestead house from 1910 built by a bachelor immigrant who settled here:

 

The larger one was moved in from a nearby homestead to preserve it. 


These houses with the rounded top were nearly always purchased as a "kit" from the local lumber yard. They are almost always ten feet wide and as long as the homesteader could afford. Most were 10 x 12 or 10 x 16 but I've seen some 10 x 10 and some 10 x 20. With the longer length there was room to divide off a bedroom so they were nearly always for a married couple, the smaller ones were for the bachelors.

The kit came with everything needed to build the house: floor joists, studs for the walls, and the pre-cut rounded 2 x 8's for the roof joists. Shiplap siding eliminated the need for double siding as board siding covered with clapboard siding required, raising the cost.

Wide pine boards covered the roof and most were then covered with sheets of tin. This was important for ease of installation as well as making a leak proof roof since there was very little slope to drain the water off.

Most kits came with a door and two windows and cost about $100. They also came with what was called "Waferboard" for the inside, which was an early type of pressed sheet. In 4 x 8 sheets it was easy to handle and did a fair job of keeping the mice from coming through the walls at will; they at least had to eat a hole to get in.

The better kits would have tongue-and-groove flooring and other upgrades but most just got by with a plain board floor and more than one had no floor at all. Many a homestead house was built right on the ground, the rocks were dug out and the site smoothed a little. By the time the house was built the boots of the builders had worn down any grass or vegetation, the hard packed dirt smoothed up pretty well, the loose stuff was swept up and hauled out and the stove, and what little furniture they had was moved in. They were home and for better or worse, had bet the government five years of their life that they wouldn't starve to death before they could prove up and own their free farm the government had promised them.
 

Stan also shared this photo by Roberta Willman, with her permission, and commented:  Eastern Montana is GREEN this year. This is what it was like when the homesteaders came in 1909-1914. Who would have ever thought this was anything but Paradise or that the rains would stop coming and the land would turn bleak and brown?


photo by Roberta Willman

Stan Howe has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West:

  An old sheepwagon

  An eastern Montana homestead and hayfields

  Remnants of  eastern Montana homesteads, part 2

  Remnants of eastern Montana homesteads, part 1

Dodson, Montana's cowboy bar

  The home place, Westmore, Montana


  Spring fiddlers' show in Pony, Montana

StanBetsy1949.jpg (27787 bytes)   Photos and stories from the family ranch in Westmore, Montana

 Early eastern Montana homestead photos


 

You can contact Stan Howe: 4433 Red Fox Drive, Helena, Montana 59602, 406-443-5658, email.

Visit his site about Westmore, Montana:  www.westmoremontana.info.


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

 

 

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