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This is Page 126.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

Week of July 8, 2013

South Dakota poet and third-generation cowboy Ken Cook shares photos of this spring's works. The photos are by rancher Carl Johnson. Ken Cook also provides descriptions:

Three weeks of snow and cold in April this year made calving difficult to say the least. When over seventy five percent of the herd calve in the first cycle, and lousy weather for most of April, keeping calves alive kept us busy:

Son Kelly and his fiancé Jeannine arrived home from Iowa and helped out during calving. Always a good time riding with Bugs:


On May 18th the grass was coming in the summer pastures so we trailed the replacement heifers to their new home:


May 10th was branding day here at the Hodson place:

Cliff C., Merriman, Nebraska:

Mike M., Merriman, Nebraska:

Son-in-law. Andy D., Valentine, Nebraska:

Son Kork Cook, Martin, South Dakota

Cliff C., Mike M., Ken Cook, Dave R., and Kork Cook headed out to round up the second herd:

 

Previously, Ken has shared other interesting Picture the West photos, including:

Sunup to sundown

  The fifth generation

 

  2010 branding

  The "tail end" of 2007

 Branding, 2007
 
kcFrankBucklesBabeand_Dolly.jpg (73113 bytes)  "Grandpa Buckles"

Family photos in the very first Picture the West

 


photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Read more about Ken Cook and some of his poetry here at CowboyPoetry.com.

Visit his web site, KenCookCowboyPoet.com Cowboy Culture...South Dakota Style,
and on Facebook at Passing it On.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of July 1, 2013

 

Rancher, poet, and writer Paul Kern shares photos taken by Fred Leslie.

Paul comments, " They were taken a couple of years ago during an extensive pack trip through the Teton Wilderness Area, which lies directly to the south of Yellowstone Park and is the most remote wilderness in the lower 48.

This picture "Crossing Glacier on Continental Divide" is of me, my horse Rory, my friend Bruce Kartchner, and his horse Dakota crossing the glacier at 10,000 feet on the Continental Divide at the headwaters of the Yellowstone River.


photo by Fred Leslie


"After the Crossing" is  me and Rory at the top of the pass just after the glacier.


photo by Fred Leslie

"Crossing the Yellowstone River at Hawks Rest" is the same group as on the glacier plus our mustang pack horse fording the Yellowstone River in the middle of the wilderness area.


photo by Fred Leslie


 


 

Paul Kern has contributed many interesting photos to Picture the West, including:
 

  Photos from a fall roundup on his Idaho ranch

  Photos from a 150th anniversary Pony Express Re-Ride

  A story from his family's history...

Photos from an Idaho ride

A tribute to Utah rancher Joe Mascaro

Contemporary photos

Contemporary photos for Father's Day

Vintage photos of his grandfather




Find more about Paul Kern here and at his web site, www.paulkern.com.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of June 24, 2013

 

We saw Nevada poet and horseman Daniel Bybee's photos of his new horse, Pancho, on Facebook, and asked him to share some of those for Picture the West. His comments are also included:

My new saddle-trained mustang was originally a wild mustang from the BLM Twin Peaks management area in Northeastern California.

He was trained for 120 days by a prisoner named Butch at the Warm Springs Correctional Center in Carson City.


This is Pancho with his trainer Butch. He took him from wild mustang to saddle broke in four months.

He is a four year old Bay Dun, also called Zebra Dun. The Dun gene suppresses the bay color on his body so it is a buckskin color. He is not a Buckskin, because technically Buckskins do not have the Primitive markings. The primitive markings are the black dorsal stripe, black tiger stripes on the backs of his legs, black markings on his neck and shoulders, cobwebbing on his forehead (black hairs forming the pattern of a spider web) and hooked ears with black on top back of the ears.

The cobwebbing and vertical shoulder stripes are not always found in Duns. Those stripes and shoulder bars are genetic markers of the original Iberian horses brought over by the Spanish in the 1600s.


Our first walk in the round pen
 


Recently, on the old Toll road from Virginia City to Reno
 

I found out from a friend that in Mexico and South America horses like Pancho are called "Caballo Bayo con Raya de Mula." They are called that because the burros have the primitive dorsal stripe marker also.
 


Some of Pancho's distant cousins

 


Daniel Bybee previously shared other photos for Picture the West:


 2011 Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive

  California branding....

 

 

Read more about Daniel Bybee and more
of his poetry here.
 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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