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This is Page 122.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

Week of May 6, 2013

 

Wyoming poet, writer and local historian Jean Mathisen Haugen shares vintage family photos and describes them. Eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

Jean writes, "Thought I'd send some of the Hornecker Ranch in the 1940s where my mother, Betty Hornecker Mathisen grew up."



Hornecker Ranch, 1945



My mother, Betty Hornecker, Apple Orchard, 1945



Haying on the Hornecker Ranch, 1945
 


Jack Hornecker at the Corrals and Barns, 1944
 


My mother with Don and Ralph Hornecker and Turk, 1945
 


My grandmother, Mary Hornecker, April 1945 by the Hornecker Cabin


 

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other interesting photos and stories, including:

More vintage Wyoming family photos

 Family photos

  A vintage Lander photo

  Early Wyoming ranch life

  A photo of her great uncle's old cabin

"Great-Great Grandpa Gambled—With a Ranch and a Daughter"

A story about Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander, Wyoming

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of April  29, 2013

Earlier this month the weather was challenging for ranchers in the Great Plains region. Yvonne Hollenbeck shared these images and comments from near Clearfield, South Dakota, where she ranches with her husband, Glen: 
I wasn’t just taking pictures. I had chopped the tank above this one and I was the one who got to take the cob fork and get the ice chunks out of the water.

 
We’ve been putting in some very l-o-n-g days but getting along OK.  We fared the worst of the storm fairly well, however were still missing two calves that were born the day before the storm hit and feared they were under a drift somewhere, although we had them all in close and behind tree groves for protection. 

We did find one calf right away and Glen went and got her mother; that’s him on the paint horse, “Amber”:

 

 

 

Boy was she tickled when we brought that calf into the shed and put him with her. 

 

Our pens were full of these types of matters and it was still snowing. It's been a long week for anyone with livestock and especially baby calves. I wonder if many people have a clue about what the cattlemen go through to get that steak on your plate. God bless them!

Yvonne Hollenbeck has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

A vintage Nebraska family homestead image

A popular Western band from the late 1950s

  A vintage South Dakota Easter photo

  A family member's invention

  South Dakota then-and-now photos

  A 2009 blizzard

  What "bail out" means on a ranch

  A vintage family photo of Hollenbeck Livery

  Early photos of acclaimed writers Billie Snyder Thornburg, her sister Nellie Snyder Yost, and their family's ranch

  A tintype of her great grandfather, Ben Arnold

  Photos of another fierce winter storm


Read more about Yvonne Hollenbeck, including some of her poetry in our feature here.

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of April  22, 2013

Gail Steiger and Amy Hale Auker live and work on Spider Ranch in the Santa Maria mountains of Arizona.

Amy tells, "The ranch goes from 6700 feet to 3200 feet in about twelve miles, from pine trees to malpai mesas to chaparral to true Sonoran desert."

She shared photos, captions, and commentary from this year's spring works; some of the photos were taken a couple of weeks apart. All are from April, 2013:

Dogs about to be very disappointed when we leave them behind:


"Jake and Jim"

We are moving the cows down to the lower part of the ranch where the terrain gives way to Sonoran desert, and a lot of stickers.


"In the Stickers" 


In this country, we trail up each little group of cows by looking at the ground. Today we looked up and saw a little group down below. Now it is a matter of getting down to them and heading them in the right direction.


"So we found the cows we were trailing...can you see the cows?"

I am always glad that I have my little camera in my shirt pocket.


"I had to guard a gate and caught this little guy getting some breakfast"


"Bubba"

We got to the corrals early. Tomorrow's drive is very long, so everyone is taking a break before we cook dinner and roll out our beds.


"Matt Bates reading and Ivan being helpful."

Dinner on a very cold windy day:


 

 

Amy Hale Auker works and writes on the Spider Ranch. Find more about her in our
feature here and at www.AmyHaleAuker.com.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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