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This is Page 120.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

Week of March 11, 2013

The following photos and captions are from the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (FSA-OWI) collection, a part of the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. 

Noted photographer Dorothea Lange (1895-1965) is most famous for her Depression-era photograph of a migrant woman:

"Destitute pea pickers in California. Mother of seven children. Age thirty-two. Nipomo, California"; Other Title: "Migrant mother";1936; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa1998021539/PP/


and she photographed many other migrants:


"The Fairbanks family has moved to three different places on the project in one year. Willow Creek area, Malheur County, Oregon"; 1939; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000004802/PP/

 


"Native Texan farmer on relief. Goodliet, Hardeman County, Texas. 'Tractored out' in late 1937. Now living in town, and on the verge of relief. Wife and two children. 'Well, I know I've got to make a move but I don't know where to. I can stay off relief until the first of the year. After that I don't know. I've eat up two cows and a pair of horses this past year. Neither drink nor gamble, so I must have eat'n 'em up....'"; June, 1938; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000001797/PP/ 

 


"Bob Lemmons, Carrizo Springs, Texas. Born a slave about 1850, south of San Antonio, Texas. Came to Carrizo Springs during Civil War with white men seeking new range for their cattle. In 1865, with his master was one of the first settlers. He knew Billy the Kid, King Fisher, and other noted bad men of the border"; August, 1936;
www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa1998021796/PP/ 
 

California cowboys were also among her subjects.


"Contra Costa County, California. Bringing cattle in from the range. Common sight on California highways"; February, 1938;  www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000002289/PP/ 

 


"Cowboy bringing cattle in from range. Common sight on California highways. Contra Costa County"; November,1938; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000002292/PP/
 

What looks to be the same cowboy and same horse, but dated months later in a different location:


 "San Luis Obispo County, California. Cowboy coming in from the hills"; February, 1939; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000002293/PP/ 
 


"Fresno County on U.S. 99...The end of the Chisholm Trail. Loading point for cattle shipment, showing cattle chute and part of corral"; May, 1939; www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa2000003100/PP/ 
 


 

"Dorothea Lange, Resettlement Administration photographer, in California"; February, 1936;
www.loc.gov/pictures/item/fsa1998018448/PP/

Read about Dorothea Lange at "American Memory at the Library of Congress
and find more information and links at Wikipedia.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 
 
 

Week of March 3, 2013

 

Dry Crik Journal: Perspectives from the Ranch blog includes entries about John and Robbin Dofflemyers' California ranch life in prose, poetry, and striking photography. We asked fifth-generation rancher and award-winning poet John Dofflemyer for permission to reprint a recent entry, "February Snow."
 

February Snow


© 2013 Robbin Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
Suphur Creek


© 2013 John Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
Pogue Canyon

There are no weekends off this time of year as we juggle days around the weather, neighbors’ brandings and our own, trying get the work done. Low snow down to about 1,000 feet with the last cold front that brought 0.62” of welcome rain, we gathered the Wagyu bulls yesterday for their return to Snake River Farms in Idaho, for their TB tests and Health Certificates before they leave California.

Roads into the foothills are impassable, corrals too muddy to brand, neighbors try to reschedule plans to mark their calves, often with cattle gathered on short grass. This time of year, one day runs into the next until we’re all done.


 © 2013 John Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
Greasy watershed

Though hard on our cows who have endured nearly three months of abnormally cold weather, we’ll gladly take the snow, any kind of moisture with less than eight inches of precipitation this season, well-below normal. The snow melts slowly, retreating only 500 feet yesterday, to saturate the ground beneath like a time-released prescription. We are still feeding hay in the Greasy watershed each chance we get, but it will be next week, after three more rescheduled brandings, before we can get another pickup load up the hill.

Though I know we’ve had cold winters before, I don’t remember one with such a devastating impact on our cows. One day at a time, and before we know it, we’ll have wildflowers and then be complaining about the summer heat.


© 2013 John Dofflemyer; drycrikjournal.com
Robbin and Bart

Find this entry here at Dry Crik Journal.



photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Find some of John Dofflemyer's poetry and more about him
here and visit drycrikjournal.com.


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

Week of February 25, 2013

Montana songwriter, poet, and photographer John Reedy shares photos from his new book, This Place. The impressive photography is accompanied by his poems and songs.  Captions and the introduction below are from the book.


cover photo: Ryan Mountain from the Stubble

ABOUT THIS PLACE

There is an almost constant rumble
echoing from Highway 69
cattle trucks, hay trains, horse trailers,
Canadians flying south,
Helenans heading home.

A gentle valley in southwest Montana
easily overlooked
in a state of  beauty writ large,
“The Last Best Place.”

This small ranch
in the shadow of Bull Mountain
has been OUR place
for the last several years.
Leased, borrowed,
this humble ground has provided
a canvas,
a focal point,
for a creative life.
A place to look
outward, inward.
A place to find beauty
and stories
that come from knowing a place
deeply.

Through this intimacy
I hope to find truth
in This Place.

© 2012, John Michael Reedy

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Sandy
 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Sunset/Elkhorns

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Full Ditch, High Summer

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Cowboys, Truck Bed

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Splash/Frost

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Platinum Sky

 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Cloud / Horse Hill
 


© 2012, John Michael Reedy, www.twistedcowboy.com
Rawhide
 

You can view the entire book here at the publisher's site.

 

John Reedy has shared images previously for Picture the West:

  Ranch photos

and his likewise talented daughter, Brigid, has also shared photos in Picture the West:

   Ranch photos

 

 

Read more about John Reedy and find a poem and lyrics here and visit www.twistedcowboy.com

 

 

 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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