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This is Page 115.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollectionsómany with photosócontributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

December 10, 2012

South Dakota poet and cowboy Ken Cook and his fourth-generation cowboy sons, Kork and Kiel, share recent photos, which give a good idea of the long days they work. 

The Cooks are descended from the respected Buckles family cowboys. Ken Cook has written several poems about his "Grandpa Buckles." He comments that one, "The Conversation," seems to really fit with these photos.

This photo was taken one morning by Ken Cook as he headed out to work at Hodson Ranch:


photo by Ken Cook

Ken told us about the following photos:

Sieck Land and Cattle are the current owners of the Buckles Ranch. That is where Kiel and Kork work. That place was owned by their great grandpa Frank Buckles and his children.

I do not know the year Grandpa Buckles built the corral that Dan Buckles, my cousin, and I tore down in the 1980s and rebuilt. It was probably built in the 1950s.

Now, in 2012, my sons have torn down the corral Dan and I built. The boys are building an amazing set of working corrals on the place. I keep telling them that if a tornado comes through, my money is on the corral weathering the storm.

Kork is doing the welding in all the pictures. Here's Kiel at the branding chute, working cattle late into the night:


photo by Kork Cook
 


photo by Kiel Cook
 


photo by Kiel Cook



photo by Kiel Cook
 

Ken writes:

These pieces of wood arrived on my phone in a text from Kiel. He told me it was the only piece of the old corral he was going to save.

 


photo by Kiel Cook
 

Previously, Ken has shared other interesting Picture the West photos, including:

  The fifth generation

 

  2010 branding

  The "tail end" of 2007

 Branding, 2007
 
kcFrankBucklesBabeand_Dolly.jpg (73113 bytes)  "Grandpa Buckles"

Family photos in the very first Picture the West

 


photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Read more about Ken Cook and some of his poetry here at CowboyPoetry.com.

Visit his web site, KenCookCowboyPoet.com Cowboy Culture...South Dakota Style,
and on Facebook at
Passing it On.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

December 3, 2012


Colorado rancher and poet Terry Nash shares photos along with comments. He writes:

From June to November we run our cattle in a private pool with several other herds. There's around 2500 acres of brushy country in the "low country," elevation around 7000 feet, and a little over 6000 acres in the "high country," rollin' hills and quakie stands at about 8500 feet. The cattle spend from June to mid-August down low, then we gather and move them a-horseback "across the top" to the high country. The August gather takes 4 to 5 days, between combing the brush and moving the day's gather the 8 miles across. They stay there till the fall weather chases us out. Usually after the first snow the cows are ready to move back down, and most are easy to gather. There are always stragglers to find though, so we cover a lot of ground in the fall.

Sortin' at the gather:


 

Loading the last of sixteen loads for the day... Hauling from the Glade Park Miracle Rock corrals to winter pasture in the Grand valley:


Pushing stragglers off the low country:


Looking off the rim above Unaweep Canyon, Highway 141 to Gateway, Colorado, can be seen 2000 feet below:




Taking a break in the high country:

 

Terry Nash has shared photos for Picture the West previously:

tagging calves

  photos of gathering bulls in Luster Basin, Glade Park

 

Read more about Terry Nash and some of his poetry here.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

 

 

November 26, 2012


California photographer Cindy Stout Quigley shares two recent photos from Mays Land & Livestock and Lost River Livestock (lostriverlivestock.com) in Howe, Idaho.

Cindy writes, "This  is a May's Land and Livestock herder's camp, dog and horse near Jack Knife Creek, Idaho":


© 2012, Cindy Stout Quigley, CMQ Photography; reproduction without permission prohibited

The above photo is one of two photos by Cindy Stout Quigley included in the recently released book, Go West: The Risk & The Reward, published by the Range Conservation Foundation and Range magazine (Rod Miller, Senior Writer; C.J. Hadley, Editor). See more about the book in our New Releases news here.


Cindy describes this photo,  a "May's Land and Livestock herder, his dogs and the ewes coming to the corral at Bear Creek, in the Calamity National Forest near Palisades Lake, Idaho":


© 2012, Cindy Stout Quigley, CMQ Photography; reproduction without permission prohibited

 

Cindy Stout Quigley shared a photo previously in Picture the West:

  May's Land and Livestock sheep ranch

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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