Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

 

Back on Home

Search CowboyPoetry.com

The Latest
     What's New
     Newsletter
        Subscribe (free!)

Be a Part of it All 
     About the BAR-D
     Join us!

The BAR-D Roundup

Cowboy Poetry Collection
     Folks' poems
     Honored Guests
     Index of poems

Poetry Submissions  
    Guidelines
    Current Lariat Laureate

Events Calendar

Cowboy Poetry Week

Featured Topics
    Classic Cowboy Poetry
    Newest Features
        Poets and musicians
        Cowboy poetry topics
        Programs of  interest
        Gathering reports
        In memory
   Who Knows?

Cowboy Life and Links
    Western Memories
    Books about Cowboy Poetry  

The Big Roundup

Link to us!
Give us a holler

Subscribe!

line.GIF (1552 bytes)

 

This is Page 110.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections—many with photos—contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos

August 27, 2012

 

These photos from Montana are from another drought in another era, more than seventy-five years ago.

The photos and captions are from the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection (FSA-OWI) collection, a part of the Prints and Photographs Division of the Library of Congress. 

 


Drought cattle at the stockyards. These cattle are distinctly below average. Billings, Montana. Ranchers are unloading their herds before they get too thin. Grasshoppers have eaten up what little grass there was before drought
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34- 005018-D]

 


Unloading drought cattle. Billings, Montana
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34-005013-D]

 


Cattle grazing near a homesteader's abandoned cabin. Unsuccessful attempts at farming have been followed by use of the land for grazing. Custer County, Montana
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34-005013-D]
 


 Part of the daily motorcade of drought refugees. The Montana-North Dakota state line.
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34-005031-D]

 


Vernon Evans and family of Lemmon, South Dakota, near Missoula, Montana. Leaving the grasshopper-ridden and drought-stricken area for a new start in Oregon or Washington. Expects to arrive at Yakima in time for hop picking. Makes about two hundred miles a day in Model T Ford. Live in tent
July, 1936, Arthur Rothstein
Library of Congress, Prints & Photographs Division, FSA/OWI Collection, [LC-USF34-005007-D]

 

The FSA-OWI collection is described:

The photographs in the Farm Security Administration - Office of War Information Photograph Collection form an extensive pictorial record of American life between 1935 and 1944. This U.S. government photography project was headed for most of its existence by Roy E. Stryker, who guided the effort in a succession of government agencies: the Resettlement Administration (1935-1937), the Farm Security Administration (1937-1942), and the Office of War Information (1942-1944). The collection also includes photographs acquired from other governmental and non-governmental sources, including the News Bureau at the Offices of Emergency Management (OEM), various branches of the military, and industrial corporations. In total, the black-and-white portion of the collection consists of about 171,000 black-and-white film negatives...

The photographer of these images is Arthur Rothstein (1915-1985).

Arthur Rothstein was a student of Roy Styker, who conceived the documentary photography project for the FSA.  Among Rothstein's assignments was the documenting of cattle ranches in Montana (see a previous Picture the West entry with some of those photos here). He is noted for his photos of the people of Gee's Bend, Alabama. Read more about Arthur Rothsein here.

In previous Picture the West entries we've had sheep ranching photos from Oregon; 1936-1942 photos from Oregon1938-194 photos from Nebraska; 1940 photos from a Quemado, New Mexico rodeo; 1939 photos from Alpine, Texas; 1940 photos from the San Angelo, Texas Fat Stock Show; and circa 1940 photos from Montana.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


August 20, 2012

Popular Alberta poet Doris Daley shares photos and comments about her summer activities:


With a couple weeks still on the August calendar, and the joys of a lengthy (let's hope) Canadian autumn to look forward to, summer is far from over. Even so, old habits die hard, and 40 years ago I would already be anticipating the first back-to-school assignment from Mrs. McCall, our English teacher in Fort Macleod. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then here is my unabridged homework assignment, "How I Spent My Summer Holidays."
 

This picture was taken in late June about 10kilometers west of Turner Valley. Up where the snow is...that's the headwaters of the Sheep River where I have ridden several times with Anchor D Guides and Outfitters.

 

This is a shot taken aboard Woodrow, on the Calgary Stampede Foundation corporate ride in late June through beautiful pastures on the 1/2 (Half) Ranch west of town. Note the CS Brand on front left shoulder....these horses are all part of the Calgary Stampede's "Born to Buck" program.

 

I was not born to buck, so I was thrilled to get this close to the herd and still remain on the domesticated side of the fence.

 

Chief Mountain (squared-off top, left-of-center) is sacred to the Blackfoot nations along the 49th parallel. It dominates the southwestern horizon in Alberta, and most of the mountain is actually located in Montana. I snapped this photo during a wonderful day in the south country with a local Nature Conservancy leader.

 

Heading west over the far range of hills with teamster Ross Fritz and local raconteur and cattleman Tony Webster. A beautiful day sponsored by Southern Alberta's historic Bar U Ranch.

 

Among many other claims to fame, the Bar U is famous in Alberta history for its Percheron breeding stock. In France, during WW I, the average lifespan for a horse in the battlefields was 5-8 days. When the madness and carnage was finally over, French horsemen came back to the Bar U in far-off Canada to re-establish their breed on French soil. The Bar U, once owned by George Lane (one of the famous Big Four who financed the original Calgary Stampede) is now a national historic site.

 

I hope it warms a few hearts in the Midwest and South to know that somewhere (in my back yard, for example) this year the rains came at the right time. The grass is stirrup high and hay crops are bountiful. Green grass and scenery to make your heart pound...a Dutch friend on the wagon ride kept saying, "They
just wouldn't believe this in Holland. They just couldn't believe so much space exists with no people." I'm sorry the moose ran out of sight over the first hill just before I took the picture.
 


My friend Tony Webster was our wagon master. He lives in Ranchlands County, just south of Longview and the Bar U. On any given afternoon in the Turquoise Room at the Elko Convention Center, there are more people in the audience than what live in Tony's entire municipality (88: I'm not sure if that includes people and chickens, or just people).


The country is looking great this year: poetry in 40 shades of green. Happy Trails from Turner Valley.

 

Doris Daley shared photos previously in Picture the West:

  A Calgary Stampede corporate trail ride

 

 


photo by Walter Workman

Read some of Doris Daley's poetry here.

Visit her web site: www.dorisdaley.com

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

August 13, 2012

North Dakota photographer Annika G. Plummer shares July, 2012 photos of stacking hay. She's the daughter of Rodney Nelson, poet, rancher, Senior Pro rodeo champion, and Up Sims Creek columnist. He supplied the captions.

One of Rodney Nelson's most popular poems is "Good Clean Fun":

I remember making hay with Dad,
     We'd put it up in stacks—
Dad used to use a stackframe,
     and filled it to the max.

Then sometimes, but not often,
     he'd say "Rodney, you've the knack.
Grab a fork—I'll lift you up,
     and you top off the stack."

Reluctantly, I'd take the fork.
     He'd lift me up on top—
I'd stack that hay to 30 feet,
     before he'd finally stop.

Then he'd drive up really close,
     I could see him down beneath
As I stepped out on the pushoff
    on the end of the stacker teeth.

He'd back up a little ways,
     I hoped he'd try no tricks
But giving me rides on that farmhand,
     was how he got his kicks!

Wasn't long and I'd get mad.
     I'd had these rides before—
He'd slide the pushoff almost in,
     Then he'd run it out once more!

.....

Read the entire poem here.

Annika G. Plummer comments, "Stacking hay is one of Dad's favorite activities, and he makes darn good stacks!"



photo © 2012, Annika G. Plummer, annikaplummer.smugmug.com.

I stack some hay I want to carry over, or hay that would be hard for me to bale. A haystack is a rare item now but when I was a kid practically all the hay on the Mouse River area was stacked. Most people used a stack frame but I make them "freehand." If they get too big you can wreck a lot of gate posts when you haul them.
 


photo © 2012, Annika G. Plummer, annikaplummer.smugmug.com.

To make a nice stack it should be finished off with someone lifted up with a pitchfork. Just giving daughter Annika a ride, I should have raised it all the way up and run the pushoff out to the end of the teeth. Wonderful way to terrify someone..
 


photo © 2012, Annika G. Plummer, annikaplummer.smugmug.com.

Most hay in North Dakota is now made with round balers. Funny for me to look at this photo. We never pay attention when we are out there but I look at this photo and think to myself, "Wow, that is a pretty prairie picture!"
 


photo © 2012, Annika G. Plummer, annikaplummer.smugmug.com.

Poor man's haying equipment. Farmall from the '50s, MM 670 from the '60s, 42' dump rake and the White 2-105 from the '70s. The 1983 baler is my new piece of equipment. Don't know how old the Rowse double 9" mower was, but it is new to me. Just got it last year.

 

Annika G. Plummer photographs rodeo, ranch work, people, and landscapes.
Find some of her images at her site, annikaplummer.smugmug.com.

 

 



 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

HOME

 What's New | Poems | Search

 Features | Events  

The BAR-D Roundup | Cowboy Poetry Week

Poetry Submissions 

Subscribe | Newsletter | Contact Us

  Join Us!

 

Authors retain copyright to their work; obtain an author's
permission before using a poem in any form.

 

CowboyPoetry.com is a project of the Center for Western and Cowboy Poetry, Inc., a Federal and California tax-exempt non-profit 501 (c) (3) organization.  

 

Site copyright information