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This is Page 106.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos



April 30, 2012

South Dakota poet Kyle Lyons shares several photographs. The first two are from the 2008 ride from Ft. Pierre to Deadwood that marked the 100th anniversary of the last wagon train to haul freight to South Dakota's Black Hills.

A 2008 article here in the Tri-State Livestock News tells about the end of the 17-day ride:

Sheer utter exhaustion was the feeling of over 200 individuals who made the entire trip of 200 miles over the vast rolling prairie and rivers and on through the Black Hills of South Dakota in the 100th Anniversary of the Ft. Pierre to Deadwood Trail Ride. Those participating rode by horse back and wagon with few modern conveniences.

Cheers from more than 1,000 people lining the streets welcomed the 300 individual riders and 50-plus wagons pulled by horses, mules and oxen as they entered the historic town of Deadwood at high noon on Aug. 15, 2008....
 

Kyle Lyons writes:

A hundred years have passed since riders and teams like this crossed this same spot on the Ol' Cheyenne. It was an experience of a lifetime standing in the same wagon ruts that my family traveled out here on.


          I was in the ride and got to enjoy the experience of a lifetime.


 

These mules are Buddy and Birdie of Jim Emery's 19-hand mule team in Belle Fourche.


 


 

We asked Kyle to tell us about himself:

 

I was born and raised in Belle Fourche, South Dakota. I've been writing poetry most of my life. Picture taking has also been a great passion. The combination of the two helps me tell my stories and sheds light on life out here in the West.

Find Kyle Lyons on Facebook, at his personal page and his poetry page.


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

April 23, 2012

 

Popular South Dakota poet, quilting champion, and ranch wife Yvonne Hollenbeck shares this family photo from about 1900. She writes:

This is Ray Kayton's (my grandfather's brother) homestead in the Nebraska Sandhills, south of Thedford near the Dismal River:


Both Ray and his brother, Emory, took homesteads in the Sandhills near each other, and both were building up ranches there. Ray was married and that is his wife and children in the photo. His wife, Henrietta, wrote to my grandmother and discouraged my grandparents from also taking homesteads in that area (which they were thinking of doing) inasmuch as the rattlesnakes were so bad she said she had to keep the kids on horses when they went outside. My grandparents instead bought a farm near Gordon where my mother was raised.

Emory was killed in WWI and is buried in France. His land was bequeathed to his widowed mother, and soon she and Ray both sold their land and moved to eastern Nebraska. The land is now part of the Jamison Ranch.

The Nebraska Games and Parks Commission describes the Dismal River:

The Dismal River is a true Sandhills river, having its beginning and ending in the grass-cloaked hills that cover some 20,000 square miles in central Nebraska...It is the state’s wildest and most undeveloped river and has been identified by the National Park Service as worthy of designation in the National Wild and Scenic Rivers System. The origin for the water welling up from the springs is the Ogallala Acquifer, a vast underground reservoir extending into northern Texas. The seemingly endless water flows and lush grasses first attracted ranchers with their large herds of cattle to the Dismal in the late 1880s. Today it is flanked by private cattle ranches.

These days it is also known for a Jack Nicklaus-designed golf course near the river, south of Mullen and there is kayaking on the river. A Wikipedia entry about the Dismal River here states:

Most of the land along the river is privately owned and used for ranching. The water comes from the Ogalalla Aquifer and boils up beneath the river in places, sometimes creating areas of quicksand. Deer, coyotes, beavers, turkey and rattlesnakes inhabit the area along the river...

 

Yvonne Hollenbeck has contributed other interesting photos to "Picture the West," including:

A popular Western band from the late 1950s

  A vintage South Dakota Easter photo

  A family member's invention

  South Dakota then-and-now photos

  A 2009 blizzard

  What "bail out" means on a ranch

  A vintage family photo of Hollenbeck Livery

  Early photos of acclaimed writers Billie Snyder Thornburg, her sister Nellie Snyder Yost, and their family's ranch

  A tintype of her great grandfather, Ben Arnold

  Photos of another fierce winter storm


Read more about Yvonne Hollenbeck, including some of her poetry in our feature here.

 

   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


April 16, 2012

Last week's Picture the West featured some of Texan Brenda Butler Hill's branding images. Here are some additional photographs of "pretty loops."

She comments, "This collection is just pretty loops that I've been fortunate enough to catch."

All of the photos were taken in April, 2011:


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Kade Butler, 17 yrs old - Overton Ranch, Elmwood, Oklahoma


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Russell Parker, 12 yrs old - Overton Ranch, Elmwood, Oklahoma


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Danny Finley - Heart Ranch Branding, Lipscomb County, Texas


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Lane Hill - Panhandle Spade Ranch, Canadian, Texas


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Wesley Welch - Panhandle Spade Ranch, Canadian, Texas


© 2011, Happy Heart Ranch Photography, Brenda Hill
Cy White - Panhandle Spade Ranch, Canadian, Texas
 

See Brenda Butler Hill's previous photos:

  Happy Heart ranch brandings

We asked Brenda Butler Hill to tell us a bit about herself:

Lane and I operate Happy Heart Ranch, a small operation in Lipscomb County.

Over the last 20 years, we have worked for other ranches and day worked quite a bit. My dad was a cowboy and I grew up that way and Lane has cowboyed all his life. I worked in town in accounting many years and started in EMS in 2002.

I've always liked to photograph as a way of recording events. The inspiration to try it on a more serious level came from our friend, Rene Heil, as he progressed in ranch photography. Unfortunately, we lost Rene in July 2011, much too soon. My goal is to pick up where he left off and record as much cowboy heritage as I possibly can.

Just recently, I've begun to write some short stories about our adventures that all speak to the humor in this way of life.

Find more photography and stories at Brenda Butler Hill's web site: happyheartranchphotography.zenfolio.com

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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