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This is Page 102.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollectionsó many with photosó contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


 

 

December 19, 2011
 

Utah photographer Nichole Crowley shares photos "through the eyes of a little buckaroo," featuring her two-year old son. She told us something about herself and provided captions:

I am from a little town, Kamas, Utah and now live in Roosevelt. I grew up participating in 4-H and little hometown rodeos. I've always admired the ways of a cowboy. Cowboys are honest and hard working and genuine. I love photographing all the hard work and traditions of a working ranch and it has always come natural to me.


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Puttin' in a hard day's work

 


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Sittin' Tall

 


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Startin' 'em Young
 


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Poppa's Pride
 


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Cowboss
 


©2011, Nichole Crowley, www.lazycphotography.com
Faceboss


Find more of Nichole Crowley's photographs attrong>

www.lazycphotography.com

and on Facebook

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

December 12, 2011

Wyoming poet, writer and local historian Jean Mathisen Haugen shares a vintage photo from Lander, Wyoming:

She writes:

I'm sending along an old photo of my dad, Bob Mathisen, Uncle Bill Mathisen and grandpa Walt Mathisen working horses in the old stockyards at Lander, Wyoming in the late 1940s.  

Lander's long-time motto was "Where Rails End and Trails Begin" because it was the last stop on the railroad closest to the southern end of Yellowstone Park from 1906-1973. The sale barn and stockyards once sat on the eastern end of Lander, near my grandparent's home and adjacent to the railroad.  

Grandpa was a long-time horse trader in the Lander area up until his death in 1975. My Dad traded cowboying for the law, by joining the Wyoming Highway Patrol from 1952-79 and the Fremont County Sheriff's Office in 1951 and then again from 1979-1986. Uncle Bill was a deputy for the Fremont County Sheriff's Office in Shoshoni at the time of his death in a car wreck at the age of 28 in 1954. My Dad passed away at age 77 in 2002.

This is one of the few photos I have of the stockyards which are now long gone.

Jean Mathisen Haugen has contributed other interesting photos and stories, including:

  Early Wyoming ranch life

  A photo of her great uncle's old cabin

"Great-Great Grandpa GambledóWith a Ranch and a Daughter"

A story about Western artist and "flintnapper" Tom Lucas from Lander, Wyoming

A story about her grandfather, Walt Mathisen; eight generations of Jean's family have ranched in the Lander area.

The story of a tree planted by her family over 117 years ago

A story about her family's brand, "Saga of the Old ND Brand Continues for 123 Years" in our Western Memories pages

 

Read more about Jean Mathisen Haugen, some family ranch history, and some of her poetry here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

December 6, 2011

Montana singer, songwriter, musician, storyteller, writer, radio host, auctioneer, Model T authority, and fiddle expert Stan Howe shares photos and commentary about where he grew up in Westmore, Montana.

 

The foggy picture from the top of the hill is at 5:30 am in July. The clear one is about the same spot after I got back from coffee and breakfast in town.

My parents managed to buy this place in 1940 and moved this old house on it from an abandoned homestead. We lived there until 1964 when my dad died. Nobody has lived on it since.

This is how it looked in October. Looks sad, doesn't it?

I think what people miss when they drive by that place now is that there was a happy family there. I never knew how poor we were and I'm not sure we were as poor as I thought we were when I got older and out in the world a little. We always had a fairly decent car and a pickup or two, we had a good shop full of tools and my dad let us build anything we wanted out of whatever we could find.


My mom and her bum lambs


My mother would not let us stay home from school for anything at all although a couple times my dad came and got me out of school to go somewhere interesting with him.
 


My sister Audrey and I on Belle, 1948


We put up hay and rode horses, worked cows, herded sheep, and worked for the neighbors.


My sister Audrey and I on Betsey, 1949


My dad loved music and we always had a radio on and when TV came along we got a TV so we could watch the Country Cousins on Sunday night. My dad and two of my uncles played music and when people came to visit a lot of times it was with their fiddles and guitars in hand. My dad and my older brothers and sister had a band for years. He played fiddle and sang and my brothers played whatever they had, mostly accordion and saxophone. My sister played the piano from the time she was about 10 or so and played in the band as my brothers moved away.

Our house always had company and there was always plenty to eat for whoever showed up around meal time. We never locked a door and left the keys in all the cars and never worried about it. Life was good.


 

Stan Howe has contributed other interesting photos to Picture the West:

  Spring fiddlers' show in Pony, Montana

StanBetsy1949.jpg (27787 bytes)   Photos and stories from the family ranch in Westmore, Montana

 Early eastern Montana homestead photos


2007 photo, Elko,  by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others at her site here.

You can contact Stan Howe: 4433 Red Fox Drive, Helena, Montana 59602, 406-443-5658, email.

 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


November 27, 2011

Professional Colorado "Western Life" photographer and working ranch wife Nikole Morgan (www.wildoutwestphotography.com) shares some of her impressive images and provides captions. She comments:

I take a lot of my pictures from the back of my horse, just documenting what we do day in and day out. Our way of life has so many wonderful photogenic qualities about it.

The scenery is the stuff movies are made of but the people are very real and they wear their emotions on their sleeves. You can see "everything" on a hard working cowboy or cowgirl's face. It makes for very strong feeling-evoking photographs and that is definitely what I am going for when I take them.
 


photograph
© nikole morgan, www.wildoutwestphotography.com  
"Dust"
We don't just get to ride in beautiful green meadows and pine tree covered mountains. Corrals always seem to be dusty or have a foot of mud in them. 



photograph
© nikole morgan, www.wildoutwestphotography.com  
"Waitin' On Irons"
A cold snowy branding morning, ropers waiting for the irons to warm up before dragging calves.



photograph
© nikole morgan, www.wildoutwestphotography.com  
"The Ridge"
The romantic notion of "the cowboy" riding off into the sunset usually isn't all it's cracked up to be. Likely he hasn't showered a few days, it's almost dark, and he still hasn't found those five pairs he has been searching for for a week. BUT....it sure makes for a pretty picture once in a while! 



photograph
© nikole morgan, www.wildoutwestphotography.com  
"A Little Shut Eye"
 Cowboys are timeless. Whether 40 years ago or today the "look" hasn't changed much.




photograph
© nikole morgan, www.wildoutwestphotography.com  
"Makin' A Plan"
 A wet snow is making everyone rethink just how many layers they want to put on. 
 

 


photograph of Nikole Morgan by John Michael Leppert

Find more about Nikole Morgan and more of her work
at her web site,
www.wildoutwestphotography.com and on her Facebook page.

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.



 

 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photos here.

 

 

 

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