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This is Page 101.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photo here.

November 21, 2011

Arizona rancher, writer, storyteller and poet Jim Olson shared a photo he says he calls "Welcome to Arizona."

He comments on the photo:

It was taken in the summer on a big desert ranch southwest of Stanfield, Arizona. The old mill does not work any longer. The old corrals, foreboding cactus, and antique windmill paint a picture from the cowboy days when the deserts teemed with large cattle herds during the winter months. I just thought it looked cool!

Jim ranches on the south end of the old Red River Ranch near Stanfield, which was once owned by John Wayne.


Jim shared another photo previously in Picture the West:

A rare view from Jim Olson's Arizona ranch


 

Find more about Jim Olson here at the BAR-D and
visit his site, www.mycowboyheroes.com.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


November 14, 2011

Bill Bolte of Central City, Nebraska sent pictures from a July, 2011 event. He told us:

These pictures are of the re-dedication of the "Lone Tree Monument" near Central City, Nebraska, using oxen to pull the covered wagon and draft horses on the hay rack.

The "Lone Tree" was a marker on the Overland trail, Mormon trail and Fort Kearney road that could be seen from over twenty miles in either direction.

The Native Americans used it to hold council under it and was first noted in diaries as early as the 1830s. It died in the early 1860s because of all the camp fires built under it and all the names that were carved on it.


See a news article about the re-dedication, with additional photos and more about the "Lone Tree Monument" here.

Bill has contributed other photos to Picture the West:

 the Nebraska State Hand Corn Husking Contest
 

 

We asked Bill to tell us a bit about himself and he wrote:

I have worked for a public power district for the last 43 years. Horses have always been a part of my life. I am president of the Merrick County Historical Museum and love history, especially the middle 1800s, the Old West, the Native Americans, especially the Pawnee since we live in the middle of where they used to roam. We do cemetery tours and history programs with the museum. Cemeteries and tombstone symbolisms attract me when traveling.
 
I am married to April and we love going to Cowboy Poetry Gatherings.
 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

November 7, 2011


 

Fifth-generation rancher, poet, and writer Deanna Dickinson McCall shared these photos from October, 2011, taken in the Sacramento Mountains of southern New Mexico where she ranches. She told us:

They're taken up Monument Canyon, where we had to clear the trail to a spring.

The trail has to be cleared after every strong wind. We're having lots of beetle infestations and with the drought, it is too much for the trees to take, so they die.


Deanna Dickinson McCall has contributed other photos to Picture the West:
 

  The drought, July 2011

   Family photos from the early 1900s

dmpp.jpg (22046 bytes)  Marshall and Texas Ranger special agent Perry Preston ("P.P.") Dickinson, c. 1912

 


photo by Kevin Martini-Fuller

Find some of Deanna Dickinson McCall's poetry
 and more about her here.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

October 31, 2011

Western singer and songwriter Patty Clayton, who splits her time between Hawaii and Colorado, shares photos of Pa’u Riders from the (far) West of Hawaii. She also shared the lyrics to her song, "Pa'u Riders," which is on her new CD, Dancin' in Denver.

She writes:

I took this photo at the most recent Aloha Festival parade here in Waikiki on October 1 this year.


 

The historic photo of the Pa'u Riders was bought at a fair... it is a vintage photo from sometime around the early 1900s.


We found a great vintage video of Pa'u Riders here on YouTube.

Patty Clayton introduces her song:

This song, a bit of a sequel to my earlier composition entitled "The Vaquero and Me," is the continuing story of the wahine Kua Ko’olani, where she has become a Pa’u Rider. In the 1800s, women in Hawaii quickly became accomplished riders, utilizing the pa’u for practical purposes.

Originally crafted as a means of protection for Hawaiian women's clothing while riding horseback, the pa'u is a long split skirt made with some 9 to 12 yards of brightly colored material that is wrapped around the waist and fashioned to hang down each leg over the stirrups. The pa'u kept the dust and rain from ruining the formal attire of these impetuous ladies as they rode recklessly determined to arrive at their social gatherings in a most dramatic entrance and it also enabled them to ride Western style in the saddle

Pa'u Riders

The sun is a rising over the sea,
at daybreak we’ll ride my pony and me
with the hoa aloha wahine so free
we’ll ride down the pali into old Waikiki
We’ll run fast thru forests so fragrant and green
where perfumes from blossoms will hang in our breeze
we’ll ride into town where we’ll race down the streets
our skirts sail behind us a thrill bound to please

They call us Pa’u Riders, Pa’u Riders.

We ride bold and fearless as fast as we dare
our voices and laughter will ring thru the air
in our worn leather saddles we sit proud and square
and leis of ilima grace the necks of our mares
Our long skirts abundant bright colors we wear
that stream out behind us in glorious flair
a flower sits tight in our long dark hair
We bring rapt attention and make people stare

They call us Pa’u Riders, Pa’u Riders.

While riding the streets on our ponies one day
I saw him the man, who had come from far away
That handsome Vaquero, Ramone was his name
whose skills as a cowboy had brought him great fame
Now he’s here on this island where I’ve come to stay
I gave him a smile as I tossed him my lei
now we ride side by side in our festive parades
My long flowing pa’u bringing wide spread acclaim.

They call us Pa’u Riders, Pa’u Riders
They call us Pa’u Riders, Pa’u Riders

© 2011, Patty Clayton, Cimarron Wind Music BMI
 

 

Patty Clayton has shared previous photos for Picture the West:

her great grandparents; the story behind her song, "Ben and Ole's Land"


Eric Weber

Find more about Patty Clayton in our feature here and at www.PattyClayton.com

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


October 24, 2011

 

California horseman Bruce Stirling shares photos of what he calls "two rare opportunities" on California's Central Coast. He writes:

Point Conception above Santa Barbara was an awesome spot and surrounded by the Cojo and Jalama ranch, which has now sold and I don’t think we can ride on it anymore.

This is also on that ranch and shows riders at a mountain pond:

Bruce, pictured with Jimmy, told us, "I’m a born-again cowboy coming to this a little later in life but am a member of a few riding clubs and get to ride on the most spectacular examples of California. We need to protect this privilege for our kids and grandkids so they can really know this country."

 

 

   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


October 17, 2011

Bill Bolte of Central City, Nebraska sent pictures from the Nebraska State Hand Corn Husking Contest, held October 2, 2011, where he is on the committee. He told us:

This was the second year it was held in Central City, Nebraska at the Merrick Co. Fairgrounds. There were over 100 contestants from youth to senior men and women.

There should be contestants from nine different states participating in the Nationals. Nebraska is one of the few that still use teams of horses to pull the wagons. Thirteen to fifteen teams volunteer to help make this event a success.

 

Among the Nebraska finalists at the National competition (as reported here):

Men's Open Class 
3. Wayne Guthrie

Men's 21-49 Class 
1. Jerry Guthrie

Women's 21-49 Class
2. Ayme Barry

Women's 50-74 Class 
2. Marlene Otte 
3. Angie Boyd

Boys' 15-20 Class
3. Lyndon Klassen


 


We asked Bill to tell us a bit about himself and he wrote:

I have worked for a public power district for the last 43 years. Horses have always been a part of my life. I am president of the Merrick County Historical Museum and love history, especially the middle 1800s, the Old West, the Native Americans, especially the Pawnee since we live in the middle of where they used to roam. We do cemetery tours and history programs with the museum. Cemeteries and tombstone symbolisms attract me when traveling.
 
I am married to April and we love going to cowboy poetry gatherings.

 

 

 

 

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