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This is Page 100.

See some past photo entries below.

See an index of all past photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photos.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

Send your photos.

 Email us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.



We welcome your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

Share your part of the West or the West of your past. To send photos and their descriptions, just email them to us.   


previous  photos

index of all photos


October 10, 2011

Cowgirl and poet Jessica Hedges lives with her husband, Sam, in a cow camp about 120 miles southwest of Ontario, Oregon. Her bio tells, "She spent most of her childhood on a cattle and hay operation in northeastern Nevada, about an hour west of Elko. It was here that she learned about the cattle, the land, and the people of the Great Basin..."

She shares some recent photos and captions from a series of photos she titled "pulling bulls":


Sam Hedges, Dally MacKenzie, and Cody MacKenzie. Getting on at the trailer and discussing circles.


Waiting at water for other riders to arrive at our first meet up spot.


Just some of the beautiful SE Oregon Country we were riding through.


"The crew" : Tim Smith, Cody MacKenzie, Dally MacKenzie, and Sam Hedges. Jessica Hedges and Mac Hedges were also on the gather that day.

 


In early spring, 2011 Jessica Hedges shared:

  photos from an Oregon cow camp

 

Read more about Jessica Hedges here, where there are links to her web site, blog, videos, and more
 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

October 3, 2011

Musician and songwriter Philip Crawford has some photos of fall in intermountain West. He describes the photos:
 

The panorama was taken in the mid afternoon along the Palisades Reservoir on the Snake River in Eastern Idaho in mid September. The Wyoming line sign was just to the right of the picture.
 

 

These river pictures are from the interstate between Pocatello and Twin Falls, Idaho. The first is the Snake River going west from Pocatello—with the OxBow dam:
 


 

And this one looks back to the east where the river comes out of the Oxbow:
 

 

This is the mountain pass going over Cameron Pass in Northern Colorado in the early morning. Typical of late summer and early fall weather before the day warms up, there were even a few snow flakes as I came over the pass:
 

 

Philip "Tumbleweed" Crawford has more photos from this series in his Facebook photo album here.

 




Find more about Philip Crawford here and at his web site, www.stfrancisks.com.

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

September 26, 2011

South Dakota rancher, poet, musician, and writer Robert Dennis shares haying photos from August, 2011.
 

He writes:

I usually mow my road ditch in front of my house and have to borrow a neighbor's little square baler to bale it and store it. It's a lot of work, but I hate to see all that feed go to waste. This year I mowed it and then used my horse-drawn dump rake to rake it into large piles, which I then pitched on to a lowboy wagon and hauled it in to stack in front of the hay feeder at the corral.

Two of my grandsons, Gabe and Lige, are here visiting for awhile so they have been "helping." They
tromp the hay on the wagon so I can get more on and also tromp the hay in the stack to help pack it down. Hauling the hay in this way takes a bit more time than square bales, but it will store better with less spoilage from rain or snow. And it is no more work, maybe even less, as a pitchfork full of hay weighs less than a square bale.

And it didn't cost me anything but sweat and as you can see by the last picture, this team is getting pretty gentle and well behaved, when six-year-old boy can drive them back to the barn. After all, this is how you train youngsters, both human and equine! And what is a little time to a horse or a kid?!

Robert added:

I got to thinking about Rodney Nelson's poem, "Good Clean Fun" and the line where he says,  "Topping out the stack" while I was topping out my stack. Not many would go to this effort but I find it as easy if not easier than  putting up hay in small square bales.
 

All pictures of me were taken by my six-year-old grandson Gabe.

Find more haying photos here at the Dennis Ranch blog.


 

Robert Dennis has contributed many other interesting photos to Picture the West, including:

  Winter at the ranch, January, 2011

Black Hills trail ride, November, 2010

  Spring works, May, 2010

  "Cowboy farming," April 2010

  Winter pasture, January 2010

Moving heifers home in October, 2009

Moving moving a few first calf heifer pairs in June, 2009

  Mijo, his "ex-stallion"

2009 calving and branding on the Dennis Ranch

  Summer ranch photos

Photos taken while he was "out riding on yearlings"

Photos of his mares and colts

Family photos from the 1920s and 1940s

Photos and stories from his ranch and Red Owl

Area photos from the early 1900s

rdfatheruncles.jpg (54358 bytes) Family photos from the 1920s


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

Read more about Robert Dennis and read some of his poetry here.

Visit his blog: dennisranch.wordpress.com

 

 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


September 19, 2011

Nevada poet Daniel Bybee shares photos from the 2011 Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive.


photo by Kevin Bell

He writes:

I was fortunate enough to participate in the 2011 Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive in June. We started in the northwest corner of Nevada and rode for four days, moving the steers over 70 miles of sagebrush covered hills and bringing them into downtown Reno the day before the annual Reno Rodeo.

The drive took place in the high Nevada desert, between 5,000 and 6,000 ft elevation. We arose every morning at sunrise, had breakfast, and mounted up for a day of pushin’ Mexican short horn steers up and down hills through several passes and over a high desert plateau.

At night, we had fantastic dinners and then were entertained around the campfire (Dave Stamey one night). We left on Sunday as dudes and came into Reno on Thursday as competent cowhands. We all got to fulfill a childhood dream, of being a cowboy and living a cowboy life, if only for a few days.

The pictures were taken by Dal Burns, Dan Bardon, and Cherie Humphreys.  Those three people along with four others and I formed the Teal team (we all had teal wild rags). There were seven teams, each denoted by their wild rag colors, working the herd in rotation at two different positions each day. Our team started on drag the first morning, and then worked the left flank that afternoon. All of the teams rotated clockwise so we all worked each position on the drive by the time we got to Reno. Each team had an experienced drover as their leader. By the third day, the drovers and trail boss were riding as outriders and letting us manage the herd by ourselves.

 

Daniel Bybee also shared a poem about the drive:


We Brought 'Em In
(The 2011 Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive)

Mt Rose stood out against the sky some 30 miles away
While we rode through that high desert makin' 18 miles that day
The yellow of the wildflowers and the bright blue sky above
Framed the cattle in that picture of the life and land I love

We'd come up through a draw with sage brush rubbin' on our boots
I was thinkin' 'bout my family and my deep down western roots
My uncle and great uncle both were cowboys in their years
And that day I realized a dream and had to fight back tears

I'd always dreamt of movin' cattle 'cross the western range
So I sought out people just like me who didn't think it strange
We all had the same goal to see what life was like back then
And test ourselves to find out just how good we could've been

I signed on to this outfit drivin' steers 'cross north Nevada
With some other would-be cowhands and soon wished that I had'a
Signed on many years ago to have more years to carry round
In my heart and mind the sights and smells and feelin's that I found

The late rains in the spring had kept the grass and sagebrush green
And the dust from the small herd was not the worst that we had seen
A nice breeze kept the sun's rays from a heatin' up our skin
As we drifted down towards Reno where tomorrow we'd bring 'em in

We'd moved this herd for three days in the wind and sun and dust
Passin' rattlers in the sage and doin' what all drovers must
While we kept the cattle movin' settin' on our trusty mounts
In a world where ridin' for the brand and keepin' your word counts

The cattle were strung out and draggin' 'cross this high plateau
With the riders in the back pushin' hard to make 'em go
Team Teal was ridin' swing along the right side of the herd
When a trail boss and a wrangler did what we thought was absurd

Whoopin' and hollerin' from way up in the front
They came ridin' through the herd like wild wolves on the hunt
And the steers went runnin' left and right and scattered 'cross the plains
With a bunch of third day cowhands takin' tight hold of their reins

The hands reacted quickly and we rode off after strays
And I got my horse to gallop through the sagebrush for a ways
The teamwork was amazing as we brought the herd in line
And we all had great big smiles as we were feelin' mighty fine

On a trail drive, you depend upon your horse to get you through
So you treat him like a partner, he's a member of your crew
And you have to work together - always have each other's back
Makin' sure to pull your weight and always pickin' up the slack

We slept out in the sagebrush and we slept on dry lake bed
The camp crew hauled our bed rolls and the cooks all kept us fed
The wranglers fed our horses and the trail boss lined us out
On the desert trail to Reno, we learned what this life's all about

We got the herd to town after four days on the trail
And we moved 'em through the streets like they were ridin' on a rail
The wranglers and the bosses taught us how to move the steers
And we came to town as cowboys and will remember through the years:

The trusty mount that carried us across brush covered hills
The lifelong friends we made and the many horseback thrills
The men and women charged with getting us safely to town
And the times we met the challenge when we said "We won't back down"

© 2011, Daniel Bybee
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 


photo by Kevin Bell
Daniel Bybee


Find more about the Reno Rodeo Cattle Drive at www.renorodeo.com.

 



Daniel Bybee previously shared other photos for Picture the West:

  California branding....

 

 

Read more about Daniel Bybee and more
of his poetry here.
 

 

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


September 12, 2011

Fourth-generation rancher Bill Springsteen describes his photo as "Some of my cows doing their favorite thing here in Browns Valley, California."

He writes:

I am a fourth generation cattle rancher up here in Browns Valley, California. Browns Valley is about an hour north-east of Sacramento in the foothills of the Sierra Mountains.

The ranch is approximately 320 acres with about half being irrigated. We run about 50  head of cows. We raise our own grass hay.

The ranch has been in the family since the early 1930s. We used to be in the Registered Polled Hereford business but now we run it as a commercial cow-calf operation.

We calve in the fall and go to the sale with them in the spring. That's what seems to be what works the best in this climate.



Bill Springsteen and his niece

 


   Share your photos for Picture the West.

Send your views of the West.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo and story to share, email us.


 

See an index of all past photos here.

Find the current photo here.

 

 

 

 

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