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This is Page 10

See some past weeks' photos below

See an index of all past weeks' photos here.

See Page 1 here with the current photo of the week.

 

We welcome your pictures. We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We're looking for vintage photos and contemporary photos: family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.

Each week, we'll post selected photos from those received. We'll also share some photos posted previously elsewhere at CowboyPoetry.com.

 

Send your photo.

 Email us for information about sending it to us.

 

 

If you enjoy this feature, you may also be interested in our 
Western Memories Project, the personal recollections— many with photos— contributed by BAR-D visitors.  Your stories and photos are welcome.


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If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.


 

July 23, 2007


Montana poet and writer Sandy Seaton shared contemporary photos of the country where she lives and works. She told us how she came to be there:

I was cowboying in New Mexico when I got an offer to work at a wilderness hunting camp in my home state of Montana.  I packed my gear and headed for the high country! The first early morning dawn, a tall horseman named Scott came flying through the meadow, cracking his bullwhip as he chased two dozen horses and mules into the camp corral. I fell in love and married Scott Sallee, and we've built our own wilderness outfitting operation (Black Mountain Outfitters) just over the mountain from where we  met.  We really enjoy sharing their area with summer guests and hunters.  We live and play summer and autumn in the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness, 980,000 acres north of Yellowstone National Park.  The bugling of a bull elk or whuff! of a grizzly bear thrills our souls.



Much of the Absaroka-Beartooth Wilderness burned during the Yellowstone fires of 1988. While the bonus is we have plenty of firewood, the abrupt spin of long dead trees crashing in a windstorm can send us riding for the
open meadows!  Several areas had been so choked by deadfall that the fires were a blessing for animals and grass.  Other areas burned so hot that only fireweed survives.  But the new trees are growing in thick and about 6 feet
tall now, and the cycle continues.


Winter and Spring finds us in our cabin in Paradise Valley, Montana, working our hounds and young horses and mules.



Read more about Sandy Seaton and some of her poetry here.

Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.


 

July 16, 2007

 

Texas poet and writer Linda Kirkpatrick shared photos from the 1950s and later. The family's Texas cattle, sheep, and goat ranching history began a hundred years earlier. She told us:

My great-grandfather, Jehu Kirkpatrick, came to Texas from Tennessee in the late 1850s or early 1860s. The 1870 census lists him as cattle raiser. I do not know why he left Tennessee nor why he settled in Texas, but I guess like so many others, he was either on the run from the law or the cheap land in this far away place was tempting even though it did have its drawbacks, one being the constant unpredictable weather.

One of the worst droughts in Texas occurred between 1884-86. Many of the new inhabitants of Texas packed up and returned “back East.” Those “hard-headed” Kirkpatrick’s did not. They chose to stay and like so many other cattlemen devised a plan to diversify. Now I am sure that the word diversify never was used by Jehu or his son, Lewis, or his grandson, Burl, or his great-grandson, Alton (my father). They probably said something like, “Well, with them cow prices down and nary a blade of grass we’d best find something to eat all these weeds.” That "something" was sheep and later Angora goats. They diversified long before the word became popular.

The cattle, sheep and goats kept the bills paid and food on the table. When one market was bad or there were drought conditions one of the three always pulled the family through.

At one point when there was “nary a blade of grass” in Brown County, Texas, my great grandfather sold his cows and drove the sheep to New Mexico. They grazed the sheep for a few years around Carlsbad, New Mexico, while in the late afternoon watching the thousands of bats fly out of a huge hole in the ground. My grandfather, a youngster at the time, made the trip there and back on horseback, following the sheep.

By the time that World War II was over and I came along the family was raising commercial cows, Rambouillet sheep and Angora goats. Still, when one market was down the other markets kept the family going!


Linda with an angora goat and Prince, the dog, at left


Linda on the right
 

The Rambouillet sheep is known for its fine wool and hardy lamb production. So the wool and the lambs were continuous money makers. Every once in a while, due to a recessive gene, a spotted lamb was dropped. Those lambs immediately became mine to bottle feed and they were later sold, with the money going in my pocket. My dad didn’t want spotted sheep in the herd because colored wool in the sack would get the price of the sack docked. "Spottie" was the exception to the rule, since Spottie followed me everywhere I got to keep that lamb until he died of old age. This colored wool is now in demand by hand spinners.


Linda and Spottie


Every year my 4-H project included Rambouillet sheep that were shown as breeding stock, definitely not market lambs, because I took them home and increased my herd size.

 


Linda and her prize-winning sheep

 

These photos date from the 1980s:


Linda and her father, Alton, marking lambs


Linda's daughter, Amanda, catching lambs for marking

 

Read more about Linda Kirkpatrick and some of her poetry here.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski; see her gallery of western performers and others here.

 


We need your photos!

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


 

July 9, 2007

Poet Sam Jackson, producer of the National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo, shared sheepwagon photos from Utah's West Desert in the 1930s.

 
The "old" and the "new" 1930s style

 

Sam told us:

My father, Alvin Jackson, was a 5th generation sheep rancher, or "woolgrower" (a term more commonly used in the industry).  The outfit was strictly a "range" operation with the sheep not seeing the inside of a building during their entire life other that 20 minutes a year during shearing.

 


This motor home built on the bed of a Model T Ford is "one of a kind."  Those pictured are Al Jackson's herders.

 

The home ranch was near the small railroad town of Thistle, Utah, the summer range was a 4-day-by-pack- horse trail to the tops of the Wasatch Mountains in Central Utah, and the winter range was a 30 day, 200 mile trek to  the Western Utah desert near the Nevada border.

 


On the winter range


The second year of WWII saw most hired hands “off to the fight,” leaving the family ranch with little help other than just us kids. The summer I turned eleven, and the three following, saw me high in the mountains of the Manti La Sal National Forest, living in a tent while riding herd on twelve hundred head of range ewes and lambs. About once a week Dad would show up with a string of pack horses, bringing supplies and a bit of moral support. [Read Sam's poem, "The Reminisce," and see some photos about his visit to that place some 60 years later]

I went into business with him for a brief time after my Navy service but between the price of wool being devastated by synthetic materials and increased government regulations the profit in sheep ranching was practically nonexistent. I opted to go back to school and Dad sold out in 1955. 

Sam restores wagons today, and you can read more about him and about the wagons in articles at RusticStore.com. A Deseret News article quotes Sam about why he restores wagons, "Someone needs to remind us we haven't always had what we have now," Jackson said. "We owe a lot to the people who came before us, who built the things we can improve on. Without them, where would we be?"

You can read more about Sam Jackson and some of his poetry here.

 


We need your photos!

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


July 2, 2007

 

In the spirit of the Fourth of July, photographer and journalist Jeri Dobrowski shared patriotic images from a Medora, North Dakota Flag Day parade, which we've featured previously in our Fourth of July feature.

Below  is Sheila Marie, horseback on one of the black and white Paints from her Painted Badlands Ranch, which specializes in black and white overo Paints, black Quarter Horses and blue roan Quarter Horses. 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski, obtain permission for reproduction rights

Below is a photo of the 7th Cavalry drill team  from Dickinson, North Dakota. The riders each carry a different flag representative of some significant event in American history. The emcee for the group tells which flag the rider is posting, tells about the historical significance and then they play a short musical piece; a touching and educational display.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski, obtain permission for reproduction rights

Below, the 2006 Miss Rodeo Prairie Rose (Wing, N.D.), Carly Backhaus and 2006 Miss Rodeo Mandan, N.D. Ashley Andrews.


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski, obtain permission for reproduction rights

Ashley Andrews went on to become Miss Rodeo America. Read more about her at the Miss Rodeo America web site and in a Bismark Tribune article here, which also tells about her battle with cancer.

See some additional photos here.

 

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Read Jeri Dobrowski's Cowboy Jam Session and more about her here.


We need your photos!

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! Share your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us.  


June 25, 2007

Fifth-generation rancher and poet Deanna McCall shared these photos from the early 1900s. She told us:

This is one of the Dickinson ranch houses in Texas from around 1910s with G. W Dickinson, my great grandfather, and family:

 

We noticed the "Bar-D" on the fenceposts and Deanna told us that was one the Dickinson's brands. Her grandfather was a Dickinson and her grandmother was a Wilson. She told us:

This ranch house was either near Abilene or in the Panhandle. He had several ranches, from the panhandle to south Texas.

 The Wilsons raised Paint horses, long before it was fashionable, and ran a couple hundred head of them. The prized stud was "Dillingham." A monument was even erected when he died, and I believe these are his offspring:

This is my great granddad, William Gideon Wilson with my dad, W. G. Dickinson (the baby), 1921. near Abilene, Texas.

This is a picture of my granny, Ruth Wilson. It was taken on the family ranch near Blackwell, Texas, when she was a teenager, before 1918. Ruth Wilson married my grandfather, P. P. Dickinson.

On November 13, 2006, Deanna shared a photo of her grandfather in Picture the West:

She wrote:

The picture was a postcard (that was quite a fad), of my grandfather Perry Preston Dickinson. He went by "P.P." He was born in Denton County, Texas in 1896 to a ranching family. He got itchy feet and rode to Arizona at the age of 12 and stayed there quite awhile. He "courted" my Granny back in Texas and had the card made for her. The picture was taken in the vicinity of Grand Canyon. It is signed "The 10X Bronc fighter," as he was  the rough string rider and was working on the 10X ranch at the time. (Men weren't boys for very long in those days!)  He was a great influence in my life and taught me many of the old stories, songs, and how to ride. He later was a Marshall and a special agent of the Texas Rangers.

This photo has been selected as the cover of the 2008 edition of The BAR-D Roundup.

 

You can read more about Deanna Dickinson McCall and read some of her poetry here.


 


 

Share your photos.

If you enjoy this feature, help keep it going! We need your photos.

We're looking for images that give a glimpse of the ranching, cowboy, and rural and working life of the West of today and yesterday. We welcome vintage and contemporary photos:  family photos, images of where you live and work, and the area around you. 

If you have a photo to share, email us for information about sending it to us.  

 


See the current Photo of the Week on Page 1 here.

 

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