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LYNN SHEPPARD 
Oskaloosa, Kansas
About Lynn Sheppard

 

 

Laptop at the Chute

Laptop at the chute
Ain't that a hoot.
could use a dog, of course.
wouldn't try it without a horse
A good Stetson to shade the sun
some good hands, at least one
maybe a greenhorn, just for fun
Ol' dad worked cows with a rope and a post
with a pencil and pad, at most
Now with everything modern to boot
I have to have a laptop at the chute.

2003, Lynn Sheppard
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

 


Cold Calf

Cold calf, cold calf freezing on the ground
Single digit night your momma laid ya down
Bad break, hard luck night to be had
Now it's up to the this cowman to save ya, lad
Hoist you up and haul ya to the house
Good thing there's an understanding spouse
We'll tub ya and tube ya
Roughly rub, rub ya down
And if God's willing, you will come around

2004, Lynn Sheppard
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

Lynn says: This poem was inspired by an incident when my wife, Carol and I spent a couple hours bringing this little fellow around. We had him on a tarp in the kitchen. He made it. 

 


 

Flip-Flop Wrangler

Male ranchers are shod with tradition
Wearing cowboy boots in any conditions
Others in lace ups strut in and out
Looking like they know what its all about
Or in plain 'ol  muddy rubber boots
Chase 'em up the ally and through the chute
Now 'ol dad in his clod hops
Would be shocked out of his sock
To see a female chasing cows in flip flops
For those who think this makes no sense
Consider when cows break through the fence
What choice of feminine footwear to pick
She wouldn't chase 'em barefoot and look like a hick
Her tennies are clean and her heels...no way
So she'll make her choice and be on her way
A flip-flop wrangler off to save the day
To round 'em up and put 'em away
A sure break with tradition, I'd say

2004, Lynn Sheppard
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

Lynn says: This poem was inspired by my son Craig. He came home to the CSA lot and found his wife and daughter, Michelle and Macey, chasing cows in flip-flops.

 

Grandpa's Cattle Drive

      Just like western history I've read.
      They take 160 crossbred head.
      Riding out in crisp cool Kansas air.
      Five mounted horsemen will get 'em there.
      Turn 'em out and keep 'em at a walk.
      A four-mile drive will put 'em on stalks.
      Five mounted horsemen, special ones.
      Hearty sons and sons of my sons.
      One so young his mounting style tickles me.
      He boldly climbs the fender like a tree.
      No wonder this scene touches me so.
      For they were riding stick horses, not long ago.
      Now they have colts, all of their own.
      Five of the best blessings I've ever known.
      A special band of cowhands they are.
      Tis like watching a western, with all I love the star!

       2004, Lynn Sheppard
      This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

        

Lynn told us: That Christmas morning was a special one... My son Todd's boys, Zach and Eli, had awoke that morning to two fine horses for gifts. We were having Christmas at my son Craig's CSA Cattle Co. and he arranged a drive. The boys had often ridden on cattle drives at their uncle's and sure were happy to have a one that mourning with their new mounts. They were joined by their cousin Brock who is nine year old that "climbs the fender like a tree." It was a beautiful crisp Kansas day and an unforgettable sight for Grandpa...Grandpa sure was proud.  

Here are the Sheppard boys in Leoti, Kansas, on that drive:

 

 

Prairie Storm, New Years 2007

Cold hard rain changing to snow.
Thirty-one hours this vicious storm would blow.
Highway closed the announcement said.
Not for 140 cold hungry head.
To gather 'em in and keep 'em alive.
They'll drive right down state twenty-five.
This is not a job for the weak.
With wind and ice slapin' the cheek.
Some might yield to stress and dismay.
But that's not the cowboy way.
So they'll ignore the cruel icy sting.
Cowboy up and whip this thing.
Want to see where cowmen get their grit?
Watch 'em ride out a high plains, Mother Nature fit!

2007, Lynn Sheppard
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

 Lynn told us, "This was inspired when I witnessed  Craig Sheppard  the CSA Cattle Co. crew, and their neighbors battle a national-disaster-rated blizzard. Their efforts were truly heroic. Everyone pitched in. The kids, Macey, Brock and Kolton, shoveled bunks and herded cattle. Michelle produced 3 square meals a day and sent them back into the battle like a ringside boxer's manager. What a crew: Tony, Chris, JC, Bill and Russ.

"The poem was inspired by the courage of those Leoti, Kansas cowmen. They fought a heroic battle against a mighty storm with good humored resolve. Craig Sheppard put it in comical perspective when he said "Finally, we had a storm that the old timers couldn't say you should have been here back in '48 or whenever."

 

 

 

 

About Lynn Sheppard:

I live on a 160 acre ranch near Oskaloosa, Kansas with my wife Carol. I grew up on a small cow/calf farm in Piper, Kansas. I spent 32 years teaching American History and cowin on the side. I have published a few articles about rural America. My sons and I started our herds from my dad's stock. My son Todd lives near Oldsburg, Kansas and Craig manages CSA Cattle Co. near Leoti, Kansas. It was watching them process cattle with a lap top at the chute that inspired the poem, "Laptop at the Chute." It sure is an example of how technology is impacting us.



 

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