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LESLEY SCHATZ
Westerose, Alberta
About Lesley Schatz

 

 

 

Coyote Moon

About a half mile from Lonesome Butte
The coyotes howl most nights
They make their homes on the poplar flats
And call a dance when the moon is bright
Those coyotes they would gather about
Just before a storm would hit
They'd dance and strut and yipe and yip
All while the moon was lit.

As the long grass grows and that horse Horse Creek flows
And the course 'o time wears thin
Boss and his crew will be singin' a tune
Singin' about where they been. Ay-y-y!

"Men don't hear much and their brain's is small,'
Boss said in his coyote drawl
"Men sure can't run and without a gun
they're chicken one and all!"
And then old boss full of thought
Surveyed Yankee Wilson's claim.
Sayin', "Men look like a real bad deal
 To me they're all the same!"

The rest of the bunch they had a hunch
Boss sure hated men
They asked that grizzled old reprobate
For the details of his hate.
Boss paused a bit just to howl a tune
And while he talked he looked to the moon,
"See these legs-one's gone you say.
 I left er in a trap one  day. Ay-y-y

Boss scratched one ear and he gave a leer as he thought of another thing

And you know boys from what I hear,
Men sure as Heck can't sing
So when you see that Prairie Moon
And hear their wild and eerie tunes,
Its just old Boss and his cagey crew and he's signing's about you
Its just old Boss and his cagey crew...............
............................singin' about you.

Lesley Schatz, All rights reserved
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


Lesley told us "Coyote Moon" was written after my great Uncle Olaf Bjelland gave me his history book that was written about the Willow Bunch/ Assiniboia area of Saskatchewan, Canada. That's where I got all the names and the location names.

My dad actually told me the story of a huge old coyote with 3 legs who had a most unusual howl. The other thing that was unusual was his color which was reddish on his front quarters...sure made for a good story the way he told it late at night when we were camping...My imagination added the rest.

 

Wild, Lonesome Place

There's a place that I know
Where the wild horses go
West of the last little town.
No saddles or bridles
No lawyers or libels
Ever touch these wild creatures so rare.
 You might never see 'em
Even when you are near 'em
 But they'll know your smell every time.
 The wind's under their tails
and their spirits prevail,
down that wild lonesome trail
way out west.
Down that wild lonesome trail
way out west.

2005, Lesley Schatz, All rights reserved
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

Lesley told us, "I'm getting a filly... that's half Mustang (from what we called the British Block near Medicine Hat, Alberta) and half quarter horse...I guess its romantic of me to love the wild side of things but that's how it is!"

 

Song of the Wind and the Rain

The wind, she could howl!
The coyote, he wailed...
The sun cracked the  leaves on the trail.

The horses were comin'
The train knew it too
They would meet 'fore the rain fell that day.

They started in Hanna
The 200 Broncs
Headin' for the Calgary Stampede.

They had 50 riders
And all rode to safety.
But 9 horses died on that day.

"Turn 'em back"
"Hold 'em there" Everything blew apart!
 A train turned the tables that day

"Turn 'em back"
"Hold 'em there" Horses were everywhere!
9 horses died on that day.

200 horses
200 miles
They'd already made it to town.

Crossing the "Bow"
On a bridge near the grounds
They panicked  and tried to jump down.

"Turn 'em back"
"Hold 'em there" Everything flew apart
A train turned the track straight away.

"Turn "em back"
"Hold 'em there" Horses were everywhere.
9 horses died on that day.

There's one thing I can say
Not a man died that day,
But that's not much comfort to them.

For each of them knows
When night comes to close
They'll meet with that train once again
They'll meet with that train once again.

The wind, she could howl!
The coyote, he wailed...
The sun cracked the  leaves on the trail.

The horses were comin'
The train knew it too
They would meet 'fore the rain fell that day.
They would meet 'fore the rain fell that day.

Lesley Schatz, All rights reserved
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

Lesley told us: The poem was inspired by the wreck at the 2005 Calgary stampede when the herd of bucking stock shied at the train whistle and stampeded, they had
just come 200 miles without a hitch and were almost at the stampede grounds. Such a tragedy...


 

About Lesley Schatz:


Lesley Schatz was born the third daughter to Don and Joyce Boll. The family lived in rural southern Alberta  most of Les' growing up years.

Les got a wonderful upbringing by being in the right spot at the right time listening to old timers tales at brandings and musical get togethers which happened regularly at Les' parents because Joyce played a mean piano,  Having a school teacher Mom encouraged  Les' love of the English language.

Lesley is married to the love of her life, Dr. Ernie Miciak, where she works as veterinary assistant in the clinic on their farm and raise Clydesdale horses and kids. Les paints and writes songs and stories in her spare time, and she also builds all sizes of Cree and Sioux tipis.

In an article, "History of the Cowgirl," about watercolor shows that Lesley Schatz did for several years through Fall, 2003, author Lisa Wojna wrote, "Along with her daily routine of painting from 5 a.m. to 8 a.m. every morning, doing the chores necessary to care for their dozen or more registered Clydesdale horses, checking the chickens, home-schooling 17-year-old Lizzy, caring for toddler Nicholas, writing songs and producing CDs, doing the housework and cooking dinner, Lesley is also Ernie's vet assistant today..."

The art show was held in Etzikom and called "The History of the Cowgirl through a Painter's Eye," and included "a collection of 31paintings of cowgirls, documenting the early days of the rodeo and celebrating their contribution in taming the wild prairie."


Lesley is also well known for her music, and she has a number of recordings.

Lesley Schatz is the recipient of a Lifetime Achievement award from the Alberta Women of Country Music Hall of Fame.  Read more about the award and about Lesley's music at the Bear Family Records site.

 

See Hugh McLennan's review of her History of the Cowgirl: Through a painter's eyes recording in Canadian Country Magazine:

That CD is available for $15 US postpaid from:

Lesley Schatz
R.R. #2
 Westrose, Alberta, Canada T0C 2V0 
email

 

She has additional recordings (click the titles for Amazon details):

  
Coyote Moon/Run to the Wind 

 

 
Banjo Pickin' Girl

 

  
Brave Wolf

 

Hello Stranger

Wall Hearts and Heroes


 

 

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