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The first time I heard this beautiful lady sing is still a memorable experience. As I listened in awe, I knew I was listening to a voice that possessed the ultimate components in vocal beauty, the qualities of texture, timber and resonance, essential for greatness which she employed exquisitely.

Juni creates moods that run the gambit from sunshine bright and cheerful, to plush, warm and dark. Like all great performers, she can modulate the voice, singing in her complete vocal range effortlessly painting pictures with her voice. She accompanies herself on the guitar with a professional deftness that compliments her totally relaxed performance style.

A crucial element of Juni's uniqueness includes the gift of superb song writing. Her original compositions can leave you breathless, tickle your funny bone, or tug at your heart strings all in one concert. I know, because I am speaking from personal experience. When Juni sings one of her Celtic ballads, you would swear she was singing of her native land.

Juni Fisher just happens to be one of those rare artists who has it all. It also doesn't hurt when you discover the delightful truth that this wonderful talent is a great person.

                                                                                 Jack Hannah, The Sons of the San Joaquin


                                                                     


photograph by Lori Faith Merritt, www.photographybyfaith.com

About Juni Fisher

Selected Lyrics

Recordings

Juni Fisher's Web Site and Contact Information

2005
Academy of Western Artists'
Female Western Vocalist of the Year

2006
Western Music Association
Female Western Vocalist of the Year

2007
Western Music Association
Song of the Year
("I Hope She'll Love Me," with Joe Hannah)

2008

Western Music Association
Songwriter of the Year*

2008
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum
Western Heritage Wrangler Award
Traditional Album (Gone to Colorado)*

2009
Western Music Association
Performer of the Year

2009
Western Music Association
Album of the Year (Gone to Colorado)

2011
Western Music Association
Performer of the Year

2011
Western Music Association
Entertainer of the Year*

2011
Western Music Association
Song of the
Year ("Yakima")

2011-2012
True West Magazine
Best Solo Western Musician
 

 

*first female recipient


 About Juni Fisher 
    official biography

In the central San Joaquin Valley of California, a horse crazy kid to grew up in a farming family, with a grandfather and father whose sideline of selling cavalry remounts was two decades past. But between school and countless singing performances with her two sisters, Juni found a way to have her first horse, and 4-H and FFA honors followed her throughout her school years.

While studying Equine Science at the College of the Sequoias in Visalia, she rode some young horses for neighbors and worked gates at the sales yard. A good "catch rider," she rode through college, with top honors at Intercollegiate and Quarter Horse shows. Meanwhile, she was earning horse show entry money singing big band standards in a dance orchestra. She trained cowhorses from snaffle bitters to bridle horses, winning her first Snaffle Bit Futurity (IARCHA) in '81, her first Bridle Horse Championship in '83 (Monterey Classic) while working on a cow calf operation, and running a roping arena. 

If there was a campfire gathering with music, Juni was there with her guitar, singing the songs of the west she'd learned from her father. In 1984 she moved to Santa Ynez, California, to train cutting horses. It was then that she really started to write songs. A local band was quick to ask her to play rhythm guitar and sing leads and backups. Members of the noted Rancheros Vistadores, an elite group of ranchers from across the nation, noticed her singing around town, which led her to working L.A. area clubs with a popular country band, which was also playing western and cowboy music.  Continued below...

 

Selected Lyrics 

An "Irish Trilogy" of songs from Tumbleweed Letters:


I Will Miss Ireland Forever

Chinaman Jack

The Same River

From Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly:

Bonnie McCarroll

Yakima

From Listen (to the horse):

Fly Without Leaving the Ground

Listen

 

I Will Miss Ireland Forever

We buried me mother when I was seventeen,
Said good bye to County Kilkinney
Them me brothers and me sailed for America
When I left Ireland behind me. 

Galen and Sean were fightin' Irish lads
They joined the horse soldier's army
I did the laundry for the officers and cads
When I left Ireland behind me. 

    Don't take me wrong, I left Ireland by choice.
    But I miss the bloom on the heather,
    And too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra in me mother's sad sweet voice,
    Oh, I will miss Ireland forever.

Galen died of fever when he was off at war,
Sean married a floozy called Meggy
He works on the railroad now, I don't see him no more
Since I left Ireland behind me.

    Don't take me wrong, I left Ireland by choice.
    But I miss the bloom on the heather,
    And too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra in me mother's sad sweet voice,
    Oh, I will miss Ireland forever. 

            I married a soldier, he seldom is around.
            I bore him a red-headed daughter.
            She stands by the river and wonders where it's bound
            While I wash his clothes in the water.
       
    Don't take me wrong, I left Ireland by choice.
    But I miss the bloom on the heather,
    And too-ra-loo-ra-loo-ra in me mother's sad sweet voice,
    Oh, I will miss Ireland forever. 
    I will miss Ireland forever. 

© 1999, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from Tumbleweed Letters
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


View a performance of the song here on YouTube.

 

 

Chinaman Jack


Here's the story of Chinaman Jack.
Lived all alone in a tin roof shack.
Grew red poppies down by the creek.
Did a little laundry where the water ran deep. 

The boys went to see him when they got paid.
Light up and sleep it off in the shade.
One gold dollar at the Chinaman's shack
Bought a yellow smoke from Chinaman Jack.
 
     He'd go into town when the weather was nice
     Bought a little salt and a big sack of rice.
     Nod and smile, lay a gold dollar down;
     Jack never spent a lot of time in town. 

Sean Malone was a simple man,
Back like a bull and big strong hands.
He could swing that hammer and drive that spike,
Where Jack was gentle and his touvh was light. 

Sean had a wife, name of Meggie Malone.
Good little woman when her man was home
But when he worked on the railroad track
She'd go out and see Chinaman Jack. 

     They say Sean would'a never known
     He came home early and Meggie was gone.
     Went for a smoke at the Chinaman's shack;
     Caught her there with Chinaman Jack. 

Sean stood there lookin' big and dumb,
That gave Jack a little time to run.
He his in the woods till he saw Malone
Walkin' back to town...all alone.
 
There lay Meggie in the Chinaman's bed.
Warm to the touch, but she was dead.
Jack got scared 'bout what he saw,
Ran into town to find the law.
 
     Malone had got to the lawman first,
     Told him a lie, oh he said the worst
     They grabbed Jack at the lawman's door,
     Tied his hands, threw him on the floor.
 
They said, "Man, who we gonna believe?
Sean Malone or this heathen Chinese?"
Cut his pigtail short with a knife,
Hung him for killin' the Irishman's wife.

Then they put a torch to the tin roof shack,
Burned ev'ry trace of Chinaman Jack. 

Nowdays Sean never gets no sleep
Wakes up scared 'fore he gets too deep.
Ev'ry time the wind blows through the cracks,
He smells the smoke ... of Chinaman Jack. 

© 1999, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from Tumbleweed Letters
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

The Same River

I saw a woman across the river
Her dress was buckskin, her hair was black
She kept a small child close beside her
And had a baby strapped to her back. 

I've heard her people have no honor.
I hear they murder, they say they're thieves.
But I can see she loves her children
She is a mother, just like me. 

I saw a woman across the river
Her hair is yellow, her dress is blue.
A red haired child played close beside her,
Carried another inside her too.

They say white people will steal our children
Kill for no reason, they say they're thieves
But this one only smiled and watched me
She is a mother, just like me. 

     We washed our hands in the same river.
     Nothing was stolen, no one died.
     We washed our hands in the same water
     In the same river, on diff'rent sides. 

This Indian woman did some washing.
She cleaned some buckskins made for a man.
Hung them to dry there on the branches,
Then looked at me, and raised her hand. 

This white woman did some washing.
She cleaned her man's clothes, and used no stones.
I've seen those leggings worn by soldiers,
Surely this woman knows none of those.

     We washed our hands in the same river.
     No one was frightened, no one died. 
     We washed our hands in the same water
     In the same river, on diff'rent sides. 

And now I stand here one year later
The river's clear now, where it ran red.
They say my husband died with honor,
Died for his people, is what they said. 

I see that woman across the river
I know her sadness, the way she acts,
Like mine her husband died in battle.
Like me she cannot bring him back. 

     We washed our hands in the same river.
     So many fought here, so many died.
     The river's deep and wide between us.
     Fed by the million tears we've cried.

In the same river, on diff'rent sides.

I saw a woman, across the river.

© 1999, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from Tumbleweed Letters
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

 

Bonnie McCarroll

Bonnie was a well known and liked lady bronc rider who lost her life as a result of a horrific accident at the Pendleton Round-up, which ironically, was to be her last rodeo performance, at age 34. While wandering the empty rodeo grounds in the summer of 2009, I sensed her there, behind the stock pens, and wrote most of the song upon awaking from a dream about her, right after that. One-hundred-year-old rodeo clown Monk Cardin gave me his eye-witness account of her accident. He passed away just 4 months later.


My name is Bonnie McCarroll.
I ride saddle broncs in the West.
Ev’ry year when I enter the Roundup
I prove I am one of the best.

    But these days when I go to enter
    I’m always the last one in line.
    And when I get there they’ve closed down the window.
    ‘S been years now since I’ve got to ride.

The last year was ‘twenty nine.
The day was September nineteen.
And the bronc that I drew was Black Cat:
A good one to win on it seemed.

But Black Cat was wild from the range.
He was fightin’ for all he was worth.
He was pawin’ the snubber, and slingin’ the blind.
His feet were not made for this earth.

     That year they hobbled my stirrups:
     Could’ve spurred him to go with ‘em free.
     But he flipped over once I was on him,
     Landed square on my saddle and me.

Don’t remember if I got him ridden.
Must’ve looked pretty bad, I’ll admit.
(I just) wanted to win one more Roundup,
And then I was ready to quit.
 
    (Oh How) things have changed through the years.
    No one snubs the broncs like they did.
    (There’s no) blindfold to keep ‘em from seein’
    And the boys they let ride look like kids.
    The boys they let ride look like kids

Mabel went on to make movies.
She and Flo were the prettiest ones.
Haven’t seen anything of Lorena or Tilly:
Heard Fox took her life with a gun.

George Moens and Monk Cardin quit clownin’.
I miss Ruthie and Rose quite a lot.
I’ve seen all the riders who once were the best
Growin’ older, and yet I have not.

     It’s been eighty-odd years since I’ve ridden:
     I’ll tell you what hurts me the most;
     It’s the way they don’t see me when I go to enter.
     They look through me like I’m a ghost.

My name is Bonnie McCarroll.
I ride saddle broncs in the west.
Let me prove, one more time, I’m the best.

© 2010, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from
Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.

 

   Juni Fisher writes about Bonnie McCarroll in a feature article, "The Last Ride of Bonnie McCarroll," in the July, 2011 issue of True West magazine.

 


Yakima

The devil combed the horses' tails that mornin’,
And dragged his evil fingers through their manes.
And the riders in the pens, they got no warnin’
They’d all be drawin’ zeros by their names.
They’d all be drawin’ zeros by their names.

A rancher’s kid from Colfax had entered.
Swapped his wife’s gold tooth to get the dough.
And he looked like hair and balin’ wire and splinters
When they got him on the bronc and let him go.
But he could ride, oh he could ride.
That day he spurred the devil right out of that horse’s hide.
He could ride, he could ride, ride, ride.
By God, that Yakima could ride.

He went to find his gap toothed little honey.
They swaggered through the crowd to get his pay.
And they smelled like beer and sweat and foldin’ money
When they saddled up and went out on their way.
When they saddled up and went out on their way.
Then Yak, he bought a diamond from the pawn man.
Had it mounted in the tooth and paid the loan.
Put that diamond studded tooth back in that gal’s hand:
Said “Kitty, that’s for interest, let’s go home”
“Cause he could ride, oh he could ride.
That day he spurred the devil right out of that horse’s hide.
He could ride, he could ride, ride, ride.
By God, that Yakima could ride.

Oh, Kitty was a wild one,
She could drink and she could brawl
Lucky for ol’ Yak, she didn’t shoot too good.
Yak kept ridin’ broncs ‘till he’d nearly rode ‘em all.
Then he split the sheets with Kitty,
And he went to Hollywood.
Where he could ride, oh he could ride.
Yakima Canutt could ride the devil off a horse’s hide.
He could ride, oh he could ride, ride, ride.
By God, that Yakima could ride.

© 2009, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from
Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.


See Juni Fisher perform "Yakima" in a YouTube video here.

 "Yakima" was named the 2011 Song of the Year by the Western Music Association. The song is from Juni Fisher's CD Let 'er Go "Let 'er Buck" Let 'er Flyalso an award winnera collection of songs celebrating the men, women, and horses of the Pendleton Round-up, released for the event's 100th anniversary in 2010.

Gary Brown, Western film historian and founder of the Monterey Cowboy Poetry and Music Gathering, wrote about the song's subject, Yakima Canutt, on November 29, 2011:

Today marks the birthday of perhaps the greatest stunt man everYakima Canutt. Born near Colfax, Washington, Enos Canutt was All Around Cowboy at the Pendleton Roundup four times in the late teens and early 1920s.

He went on to Hollywood, as many of the early rodeo stars did, and was paid much more taking falls than one could make punchin' steers. Yak made over 200 films as a stunt man, outlaw and 2nd unit director.

Most people have forgotten he was also a leading man in the Golden Era. His King of the Wild Horses demonstrates his great riding skills. In the '30s, he played the bad guy and did the stunts as well. He is most known today for the following: stunt work in Stagecoach; second unit director in films such as Spartacus, El Cid and Ben Hur.


Yakima Canutt, 1918, photo courtesy of Gary Brown

(See Gary Brown's "Western Cinema in the Golden Age" and "Top 10 Memorable Silent Westerns Worthy of Watching" in our feature here.)

 

Fly Without Leaving the Ground

Horses defined my life story,
Sometimes they were what got me through.
But hardship and heartache got to me:
Made me forget all that I knew.

Then I spent my life dragging a shadow,
Wasted youth chasing a light.
Finally came back to what I needed most,
And everything’s clear when I ride.

     We dance to the heartbeat of hoofbeats
     In a harmony without a sound.
     With the reins in my hands there is freedom
     To Fly....without leaving the ground.
 

It’s a give and take thing to be trusted:
You allow me to sit on your back.
And when I let go and let you be a horse
You give me the courage I lack.

It’s a partnership old as the ages:
Ever changing, who teaches who.
There’ve been some horsemen who’ve helped me,
But the teacher I’ve learned from is you.

     We dance to the heartbeat of hoofbeats
     In a harmony without a sound.
     With the reins in my hands there is freedom
     To Fly....without leaving the ground.
 

(Bridge)
Without speaking you comfort my soul,
and quiet the storm in my mind,
Who needs the rest of the world,
When I’m riding I let it go by

     While we dance to the heartbeat of hoofbeats
     In a harmony without a sound.
     With the reins in my hands there is freedom
     To Fly....without leaving the ground.

© 2013, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from Listen (to the horse)
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.

 

Juni Fisher competed in the Celebrity Cow Horse competition at the National Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity in Reno, Nevada on September 28, 2012, and won, with I'm D Rey Smart, owned and trained by Jon Roeser.

.
photo by Cindy Stout Quigley
Juni Fisher and I'm D Rey Smart



From the official announcement:

Juni Fisher returns to the show pen at the National Reined Cow Horse Association Snaffle Bit Futurity's first-ever Celebrity Cow Horse competition, Reno, Nevada, September 28, 2012, the evening preceding the "finals" for the most elite horse show in the the Western riding world. Over 400 horse and rider teams compete for over a million dollars in prize money in the Futurity alone, and there are also divisions for hackamore and bridle horses.

This year, the NRCHA, echoing the National Cutting Horse Futurity's Celebrity Cutting in Fort Worth, Texas. "The difference [for celebrity riders]" explains a top cowhorse trainer from California, "is that putting a 'celebrity' who does not really ride much on a cutting horse can work, because on the right horse, it's about comparable to standing up and walking in a commercial airline through a patch of rough weather. Riding a reined cowhorse, on the other hand is more like actually flying a fighter jet."


Juni Fisher on her own Snaffle Bit Futurity and Bridle Champion, Ra May Wind, 1983, Stockton


Since Fisher trained and showed winning snaffle bit futurity and bridle horses in the past, she was recently  "secretly" screened by a committee member who was instrumental in getting her on some cutting horses last winter, in front of a trusted trainer, to see if she could still sit a cowhorse. After that screening, she was a "first pick" for this exciting event, which will also feature country singer Trent Willmon.


Juni Fisher being "screened," without her knowledge, for a spot
 in the upcoming competition, Wickenburg, Arizona, 2012

One of her old friends from the cowhorse world, Million Dollar Rider, Snaffle Bit Futurity Champion and World's Greatest Horseman Jon Roeser, from Lemoore, California has been helping Juni get ready by setting her up with chances to ride "down the fence" across the U.S. as she tours. She flies to California from her tour route when possible to prepare.


Juni Fisher schooling her mount for the Reno event, 2012

Juni Fisher has been offered a choice of several great horses to show and her sentimental pick is one of Roeser's stallions that has been successful as a reined cow horse and cutting horse with Roeser in the saddle. Jon Roeser apprenticed with Fisher's cowhorse training mentor, the late great Greg Ward, who was instrumental in Juni's successes back in the early '80s. According to Fisher, "Riding Jon's nice bridle horse is as close as humanly possible to riding one of Greg's horses: they have the right feel, the right responses, and the power and speed I'm looking for. I don't know how seriously the other fellas in this competition are taking this, but I am 100 percent on deck with riding down the fence even better than in the old days!"

Find additional information about the event at here at the NRCHA site.

 

Listen

It’s the way of our kind to do as we’re told;
Our nature says “run,” we’re taught to be bold.
But if you were the horse and if I were to ride
I’d want you to know, we’re on the same side.

     For once would you try to hear what I hear?
     See the world through my eyes, not just through my ears.
     This horse has a voice: do you know somethin’s missin’?
     I’d give you my all if you would just listen.

I don’t know how to whine, or how to complain,
But I’ll say when I’m tired or when I’m in pain.
There’s times that we fight, but I’m tryin’ to help.
If you got to know me, you just might know yourself.

     And so, would you try to hear what I hear?
     See the world through my eyes, not just through my ears.
     This horse has a voice: do you know somethin’s missin’?
     I’d give you my all if you would just listen.

          There are days when we work so easily
          Through all the confusion that gets in our way
          We work in harmony, you lay your hand on me
          And assure..... we’ve had a good day.

And I love when you try to hear what I hear.
See the world through my eyes, not just through my ears.
This horse has a voice: you found what was missin’.
I’ll give you my all, ‘cause you learned how to listen.
I’ll give you my all: Thank you...for listenin’


© 2013, Juni Fisher/Red Geetar Music ASCAP 
from Listen .. to the horse
These words may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's permission.

 

Juni Fisher's "Listen" was named the Western Music Association's "Song of the Year."

The song is featured as the soundtrack to an important film-in-progress, Out of the Wild, based on Mark Rashid's  story.

Based on actual events, the film is described as, "... the story of Henry McBride, an alcoholic, down and out, modern era cowboy who has lost everything. McBride’s self-discovery begins when a no-nonsense rancher with a deep love for horses, Jessie King, introduces him to a quieter way of training a troubled mustang, a horse whose past and temperament mirror his own. What transpires is a story of love, redemption, and moving both man and horse beyond their deepest wounds to discover lives they never thought possible...

"In a world of pop culture idols, relative moral values, over promoted entitlement and failed communication between generations and cultures, we find ourselves seeking genuine heroes in America that might have the ability to help us overcome at least a portion of these challenges. Mark Rashid, with his philosophy and the story he has to tell, is one of them. He is a firm believer in the resiliency of the human spirit and it’s ability to overcome even the toughest of life’s challenges, particularly alongside the tender, entrancing, profoundly powerful spirit of the horse."

Producers are donating significant portions of their net profits to The Pegasus Project Horse Rescue of Eastern Texas and Helping Hand Healing Hooves of Cedarburg, Wisconsin.

To get involved, see Out of the Wild on Kickstarter, where there is a video introduction; the film's web site, outofthewildmovie.com; and its Facebook page.



 

Read Juni Fisher's song, Goodnight Good Pony, written for Joelle Smith and included on her Cowgirlography CD.

 

 


Recordings

Listen

The main title of Juni Fisher's latest recording, Listen, is deceptively spare. Even before you listen to the dazzling music, the engaging liner notes draw you into into her world and the unique experience of the project; you're listening before a note is played. You follow her journey and learn how she came to listen to her own heart in a greatly healing way. What results are songs—from blues to ballads that are deep, moving, exhilarating, and complex—with a singular passion: the horse.

Along with her own outstanding compositions, there are collaborations with poets Waddie Mitchell and Diane Tribitt; a cover of Mike Beck's iconic "Patrick"; and the traditional "Stewball."

A "warning" on CD states, "The true horsemen and women who listen to this album may be inspired to laugh, cry, and share the word. Those who do not fully understand may seek to learn more, and for that, the horses of the world are celebrating..." In short: everyone should listen.

Produced by Dave Martin, the music is flawless. Carolyn Martin joins in on Harmonies in the title track. Jeri Dobrowski of Lamesteer Publishing & Graphics designed the attractive package, which includes a photograph by California's Cindy Stout Quigley.

Find the lyrics above for the standout "Fly Without Leaving the Ground," a song filled with hard-earned wisdom.

Listen (to the horse) is available at www.JuniFisher.com.

Listen
For Want of a Nail
Still There (by Waddie Mitchell, Juni Fisher)
Fillinic
Fly Without Leaving the Ground
Stewball Traditional
Patrick (by Mike Beck)
Cuttin' Horse Pen
Song of the Nighthawk (by Diane Tribitt, Juni Fisher)
Who They Are (by Juni Fisher, Waddie Mitchell)
 Ride With Your Heart Open


$15.00

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com
 


 

Let 'er Go "Let 'er Buck" Let 'er Fly


2010

Top singer and songwriter Juni Fisher's Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly celebrates the men, women, and horses of the Pendleton Round-up—marking its 100th anniversary in 2010. There are eight original songs along with others written by Ian Tyson ("The Amber Saddle"); Wylie Gustafson and Paul Zarzyski ("A Pony Called Love"); and Hal Ketchum and Danny O'Keefe ("Jackson Sundown").

She introduces three legendary Pendleton riders in her original songs: Bonnie McCarroll, Prairie Rose Clayton, and Yakima Canutt. Her audio commentaries and liner notes reflect the depth of research that went into this project, including interviews with participants, family, and experts, and hours in archives and museums poring over photographs and films, listening to tapes, and studying books.

A pioneer in her own world, who better than Juni Fisher to tell the stories of other women who fought for their place in a mostly-male world. In 2008, Juni Fisher was the first female to receive the Western Heritage Wrangler Award for Traditional Western Album from the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum (for Gone to Colorado) and the first female to receive the Songwriter of the Year Award in the history of the Western Music Association.

The title song is introduced and the names of the saddle bronc-riding women are proudly stated. Juni Fisher states, "This song is for every one of them." "Cowgirlfriends," a fun, cheeky duet with Patty Clayton has already received wide radio play. Juni Fisher writes about its inspiration, "After studying 900-plus archived photos of early rodeo performers, it became evident which cowgirls were friends and which were not."

But the women's stories are just one part of this project. Rodeo greats Jackson Sundown and Jerry Ambler have their places. And others are mentioned in other songs, particularly in the inventive "Snubbin' Horse (Not for Me)," a hats off to the forebears of pickup horses, told from a snubbing horse's perspective. Other tracks include "A Horse Like You," a swing-style song to a favorite horse and "Round-up to Remember," a rousing, catchy tune for the Pendleton Rodeo itself. 

Few can set a mood and bring characters to life as well as Juni Fisher. Songs from past acclaimed albums, including Gone to Colorado, Tumbleweed Letters, Sideshow Romance, and Cowgirlography are recognized as important and lasting contributions to the Western music canon. Her songwriting magic creates worlds. Andy Nelson (who plays the part of a rodeo announcer on the cleverly-written introduction to "A Pony Called Love") says it well in his vivid description of Let 'er Go 'Let 'er Buck' Let 'er Fly: "In an instant I was a century younger, I tasted the dust in the Pendleton arena, I smelled the lathered bucking stock, I rode with Jackson Sundown, and I witnessed Bonnie McCarroll's fateful ride."

Top musicians with great fiddles, mandolins, piano, Irish banjo and more add to the mix and to the uncompromising quality of the production. The snappy package design by Jeri Dobrowski with cover art background by Janene Grende (www.janenegrende.com) captures the spirit of the lively tales inside. 

Intro: Let 'er Go, Let 'er Buck, Let 'er Fly
Let 'er Go, Let 'er Buck, Let 'er Fly
Jackson Sundown
Cowgirlfriends (with Patty Clayton)
Intro: Bonnie McCarroll
Bonnie McCarroll
A Horse Like You
Intro: Prairie Rose
When I Was Prairie Rose
Intro: Yakima
Yakima
Intro: Pony Called Love (with Andy Nelson)
Pony Called Love (by Wylie Gustafson and Paul Zarzyski)
The Ambler Saddle (by Ian Tyson)
Snubbin Horse (Not For Me)
Round-up to Remember

$15.00

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com
 


 

Gone for Colorado

Winner of the Western Heritage Wrangler Award
from the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum

Sedalia Colorado was the birthplace of Juni's maternal Grandmother, and the scene of successes and heartbreaks for her Grandmother's father, John E Overstreet. Juni set out to uncover a long-kept family secret, about John's first family: his wife and child who shared a ranch and life with him. 

From his birthplace in Missouri, to long cattle drives as a a teenager, to his first marriage and child on a historic Colorado ranch, John Overstreet lived his dream as a cowboy, leaving an indelible and still-present mark on Sedalia. Songwriting legend Ian Tyson sent Juni his "Range Delivery," and writer of "Old Double Diamond," Gary McMahon contributed "Waitin' For Spring." Top Producer Rich O'Brien added incredible guitar and mandolin, as well as his keen ear for production. Patty Clayton's beautiful harmonies are perfect throughout. If you love storytelling through song, and want to experience a classic journey, buy this for yourself and your family members.

All songs by Juni Fisher except where noted

1. Sedalia Colorado: Never Knew
2. Gone For Colorado
3. Goin' Somewhere
4. Long Way From Missoura
5. Railroad Corral (*traditional)
6. Sedalia Colorado: Family Secret
7. Lilac Blue Eyes
8. Sedalia Colorado: On Jarre Creek
9. Emma
10. Sedalia Colorado: Ada Dow
11. Waitin' For Spring (*by Gary McMahon)
12. Colorado Trail (*traditional)
13. Wild New Mexico Cowgirl
14. Range Delivery (*by Ian Tyson)
15. Sedalia Colorado: The Story That I Tell
16. Whippoorwill
 

$17.00 postpaid

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com
 

[See some photos and read more about Juni Fisher's ancestors in a Picture the West entry here.]


 

Cowgirlography

New for 2006! "Cowgirlography" describes this new Juni Fisher release to a
TEE! Swing your saddle on a westward wind and enjoy the ride as she takes you from a county fair race track to the work pens and a lady vaquero's way of training, from a dying wrangler's last request to a rollicking celebration of the Cowgirl and the ways of the West. Dedicated to the late great Western Artist, Joelle Smith, this celebration of the Cowgirl is a must have!

All songs by Juni Fisher except where noted

Wayfaring Rider intro
The Race Call
Little Red Horse
Silver Music (In the Bridle)
Wayfaring Rider continued
To Remember the Alamo (by Lisa Aschmann & Juni Fisher)
Cowgirlography
Bring My Fiddle
Wayfaring Rider continued
The Brazos (traditional)
The West (by Jack Hannah & Baxter Black)
 I Hope She'll Love Me  (duet with Sons of the San Joaquin's Joe Hannah)
Wayfaring Rider continued
Ballad of the Runaway Horse (by Leonard Cohen)
Wayfaring Rider continued
Goodnight Good Pony Goodnight
Wayfaring Rider outro

$16.00 postpaid (any 3 CDs for $40)

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com


Sideshow Romance

Includes:

Sideshow Romance
Teddy O'Neill
Oh Galveston
Raglan Road
The Sky
Raven's Wing
    Wish I'd Never Had That Kid
The Dog and The Pig, Ike and Betsy and Me
Blue Eyed Saddle Tramp
Ghost of del Cielo
He'd Be Home By Now
Well Traveled Trail

$16.00 postpaid  (any 3 CDs for $40)

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com

You can listen to tracks and also order from:

CD Baby

Song Ramp

Sideshow Romance is also available from California Classics


Tumbleweed Letters

Includes:

Red Velvet Slippers
Me and Martha Jane
I Can't Complain
Jersey Lilly
Sierry Boots
I Will Miss Ireland Forever
Chinaman Jack
The Same River
Just Doin' My Job
If This Ain't Jesse James
Tumbleweed Letters

$16.00 postpaid  (any 3 CDs for $40)

To order by mail, send check or money order to:

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064

or order on line:

www.JuniFisher.com

You can listen to tracks and also order from:

CD Baby

Song Ramp

Tumbleweed Letters is also available from California Classics



photo by Janet Hopson

 

More About Juni Fisher (continued from above)

Juni's ability to ride at speed across the hills found her working as a foxhunting professional, and she accepted a position with a hunt club in Tennessee. Point to point racing, steeplechasing, and horse trials took the place of cowhorses, while she honed her songwriting skills amongst some of Nashville's finest. She and husband Rusty Bane, who works for Purina Mills as their Equine Specialist, keep two favorite horses these days, living in Franklin, Tennessee.

She returned to her Western roots in 1999, with her first album release, Tumbleweed Letters, whose title track features a sweetly rendered duet with Ranger Doug of Riders in the Sky. The attention she grabbed with the cutting edge program director, and DJ of the popular "Opry Star Spotlight" on the famed radio station WSM landed Juni on the Ryman stage for the Opry's 75th Anniversary show, and a regular spot on the live radio show.

Monterey Cowboy Poetry and Music Festival director Gary Brown heard her first album by chance, and though it took him a while to find her, he hunted her down to perform at the 2004 Festival. He shared Juni's music with other promoters and artists, and started the wheels turning for this remarkably talented lady. Juni released a second album, Sideshow Romance in the summer of 2004.  Her third release, Cowgirlography, in 2006 features a duet with Sons of the San Joaquin's Joe Hannah, and has received rave reviews (and the 2007 Western Music Association Song of the Year award).

Fisher is a lot easier to find these days, performing at venues like the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada; the Monterey Cowboy Festival; the Santa Clarita Cowboy Festival; the Colorado Cowboy Gathering; the Spirit of the West Festival in Washington; the Cochise Cowboy Poetry Gathering; radio shows; The Riverbend Music Festival;  and many more venues. From her appearances, and by word of mouth, the bookings and the kudos keep rolling in, including  the 2005 Academy of Western Artists Western Female Vocalist of the Year; 2005 Western Music Association Crescendo Award; 2006 Western Music Association Female Vocalist of the Year; 2007 Western Music Association Song of the Year ("I Hope She'll Love Me," with Joe Hannah); 2008 Western Music Association Songwriter of the Year (first woman to receive the award); 2008 National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum Western Heritage Wrangler Award Traditional Album (Gone to Colorado) (first woman to receive the award); 2009 Western Music Association Performer of the Year; and 2009 Western Music Association Album of the Year (Let 'er Go "Let 'er Buck" Let 'er Fly).
 


photo by Buzz Fisher Burtner

 

 

Juni Fisher's Web Site and Contact Information

 

Visit Juni Fisher's web site for more about her and her music, to order CDs, and more.

 

www.JuniFisher.com

Juni Fisher's blog

Juni Fisher
Red Geetar Records
2105 Granville Rd
Franklin, TN 37064
email


photo by Buzz Fisher Burtner
Molly and her short-eared friend, Juni Fisher

 

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