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GLENN MARTIN
Durango, Colorado
About Glenn Martin
 

 

 

Wet Saddle

Have you ever sat a wet saddle?
When the cold wind cut to the bone
It ain't no fun workin cattle
When the weather makes you wish you were home
 
When your hands are so numb, you can't feel the reins
And you know you just can't throw a rope
Your feet hurt so bad, you can't stand the pain
Maybe they'll get numb too...you hope
 
Your horse rides as rough as a wagon
He slips and he slides on the trail
You ride in to chuck with your tail a draggin
You're coughing and your face is pale
 
But there's hot coffee, biscuits and gravy
 Now what do you think of that
Bet they would taste allot better
Without the rain that drips off your hat
 
So you catch up a new mount, but he don't want to go
Guess you can't blame him none
Horses don't like wet saddles neither
Now ain't cowboyin just a whole lot of fun?
 
Have you ever sat a wet saddle
When the cold wind cut to the bone
It ain't no fun workin cattle
When the weather makes you wish you were home

2009, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn comments, "'Wet Saddle' is one of those experiences I cherish. Spring and Fall roundup as well as everyday experiences on the large ranches where I grew up have left me with a myriad of wonderful memories that will inspire me forever."

 


 


Grandpa's Sleigh

It's three feet deep, and still comin down
I've never seen so much snow
The wife wants to do some shoppin in town
And I wonder how we're gonna go

The cows need fed and the tractor won't run
The kids just wanna play
The wife just smiled and said let's have a little fun
We'll dig out Grandpa's sleigh

Grandpa's sleigh, fill it up with hay
I'd forgotten chores could be fun
Grandpa's sleigh, don't put it away
Go to town when the chores are done

I'm glad I broke my horses to drive
You know it was Grandpa's way
I know he'd be proud if he were alive
Go a ridin on Christmas day

You know it was dark when we finally pulled in
The chores and the shoppin done
The family all had a great time pitchin in
And even the horses had fun

Grandpa's sleigh, fill it up with hay
I'd forgotten chores could be fun
Grandpa's sleigh, don't put it away
Go to town when the chores are done

2009, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn comments, "'Grandpa's Sleigh' was written while feeding my cows in a heavy snowstorm here in Colorado. A sleigh would have made things easier. It is included on my brother Richard Martin's latest CD, Bringing Water to the Land."

 


Down at the Sale Barn Cafe

Eating pie and coffee, the same old stories over again
Things were different when they were young, living way back when

A man didn't wear his spurs in town, and he took off his hat in the house
He opened the door for the ladies, and around them he watched his mouth

The sale barn cafe every Wednesday they say, is an old man's chance to be seen
Eating pie and drinking coffee, and reliving all his old dreams

Just when you think you've heard it all, and you know how the cards will lay
The old men at the counter will take you to school, down at the sale barn cafe

You can watch them down at the sale ring, watching the younger men bid
You can watch them nod their approval, or wish for sure that you did

The sale barn cafe every Wednesday they say, is an old man's chance to be seen
Eating pie and drinking coffee, and reliving all his old dreams

2010, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn commentsI used to hang around the sale barn as a kid and run the alley, clean out trailers, etc. for money to go to the cafe and buy a piece of pie. I fondly remember the old men there and still enjoy seeing them when I now go to the sale barn.

 

End of Summer

Well, it's nearly the end of summer
And the river has slowed its flow
There's a cool breeze in from the mountains
And I hear that there's been snow
 
The aspen trees have all turned to gold
And droppin leaves on the ground
We need to get back to the high range
And bring those cattle down
 
Horses gathered round the live oak tree
Trying to stay out of the sun
Swishing their tails in each others face
Keeping the flies on the run
 
My wife needs some mason jars
To finish the garden this year
The kids need new clothes for school
And we still have to butcher that steer
 
Got to lay in some wood for the winter time
Before it gets too cold
The chores to be done never end
But you know they never get old
 
My life seems so simple at times
But you know I'll never quit
Workin the land and the cattle
Well I guess it just seems to fit
 
Some men live for each moment in time
But they're never satisfied
Me I live from season to season
My work is my pride
 
Well, it's nearly the end of summer
And the river has slowed its flow
There's a cool breeze in from the mountains
And I hear that there's been snow

2010, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn comments: It is a true reflection of how it is for ranching life. I wrote this while contemplating what needed to be done before the snow last year. My brother, Richard Martin, helped me with this and actually put it to music and it is on his CD Bringing Water to the Land.

 


 

Horses and Animals Small

He's the last of the old time cattle vets
The last in the county to go
There's plenty more who say they serve large stock
But they only treat horses you know
 
So he's busy as he can be
Treating cattle from A to Z
When he takes off there'll be no one to call
Except for horses and animals small
 
Raising cattle these days ain't easy
There's problems and prices are bad
If one gets too sick for me to fix
He's the best vet I ever had
 
So he's busy as he can be
Treating cattle from A to Z
When he takes off there'll be no one to call
Except for horses and animals small
 
I have to say we're lucky to have him
And I hope he don't plan to go
When he takes off we'll be flat outa luck
I'll have to quit the cattle I suppose
 
So he's busy as he can be
Treating cattle from A to Z
When he takes off there'll be no one to call
Except for horses and animals small
 
He's the last of the old time cattle Vets
The last in the county to go

2010, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn comments: This is a true story for our county and I'm afraid for many rural counties around this country. Our last cattle vet, Jeff Warren, DVM, is a godsend and we all dread the day he leaves. I wrote this with my brother for him, and my brother, Richard Martin, has included it on his forthcoming CD.

Granddad

He taught me to ride and to put on my spurs
And when I bucked off he gave me the nerve
To climb back in the saddle of that ornery old hoss
To hang and rattle and show him who's boss

Now I never thanked him for all that he gave
And there's allot more that he took to his grave
He was the best friend that I ever had
Always remember my dear old Granddad

When I got older and started to flirt
He taught me with fillies you don't use a quirt
You must be gentle, yes that is the plan
You'll have them eating right out of your hand

Now I never thanked him for all that he gave
And there's allot more that he took to his grave
He was the best friend that I ever had
Always remember my dear old Granddad

He was the smartest man that I ever knew
He taught me things that you don't learn in school
Like the value of being true to your word
And not believe all that you've heard

Now I never thanked him for all that he gave
And there's allot more that he took to his grave
He was the best friend that I ever had
Always remember my dear old Granddad
Yes, I still remember my dear old Granddad

2010, Glenn Martin and Richard Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

These lyrics were co-written with Glenn's brother Richard Martin, and the song is on Richard Martin's recent CD, Morning Coffee. The lyrics have been added to our collection of poems and songs about dads and granddads.

Glenn told us, "...I think a lot of us who grew up working the ranches and farms had good relationships with our granddads. It's too bad we were so busy 'growing up' and in such a hurry that we never took the time to really appreciate the old man, and before we knew it he was gone. I feel this poem/song is the least I could do to honor that special person and that special relationship."

 

 

His Last Mile

Every season he was horseback every morning
He'd check windmills and ride the old fence line
He'd change horses a little after lunch
Come draggin back just about suppertime

Now he was not a young man, was in his sixties
But he never let his age slow him down
He could ride the ponies all day long
Still liked to dance when he went into town

Don't know where he came from, or what he did before
I get the feeling that he was kinda wild
He carried lots of scars, both seen and hidden
But he always spoke so slowly, and kinda mild

Sorry I never learned any more about that man
Bet he could of told me stories to make me smile
But he never cared to share about his life and times
Up to the day that he rode his last mile

Then one day he didn't show for breakfast
I found him in the bunkhouse lyin still
By the bed underneath a glass of whiskey
On a scrap of paper, he wrote his last will

He wrote: I got no money left to leave nobody
And there ain't noone to accept it if I did
Just put my spurs and saddle up for auction
And give the money to some homeless kid

Plant my bones by the windmill in the lower pasture
And say a few kind words there, if you care
And when you check the windmill by that old fence line
You can have the whiskey that I keep down there

Sorry I never learned any more about that man
Bet he could of told me stories to make me smile
But he never cared to share about his life and times
Up to the day that he rode his last mile

2011, Glenn Martin and Richard Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glenn told us, "I wrote this poem/song with my brother Richard about a certain man we knew growing up on the ranch, but it fits many of the older cowboys we knew. It will be on our next CD that we are currently working on. I have talked with many people who grew up working ranches and it's amazing how many people have similar stories about older cowboys that no one knew anything about."

Thunder

Thunderstorms can be terrifying
To a green horse broke in the spring
Lightning flash can make him blind
And thunder...his ears ring

And riding a colt in a thunder storm
On a saddle as flat as a pan
Can make you wish you had stayed in school
Instead of trying to make a good hand

But that's what I did when I was young
Broken bones are my claim to fame
At least I got to name that colt
And Thunder...is his name

Now cowboys are smart and can figure things out
Comes to work they don't sit on the fence
But riding a colt in a thunderstorm
Now that really don't make sense

But cowboys are proud and they won't back down
When challenged they put on a show
Like riding a colt in a thunderstorm
For reasons you don't even know

But that's what I did when I was young
Broken bones are my claim to fame
At least I got to name that colt
And Thunder...is his name

2011, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.


Glen told us, "This poem is a true story, as many of mine are. Most people know how proud cowboys are, especially when it comes to a dare. Most of us have stories about stupid things we did in our youth. Just part of cowboying, I guess. This poem/song is included in the next CD soon to be released by my brother Richard Martin and me."

 

 

Loading the Colt

I bought a two-year-old colt last fall
From a neighbor I thought was a friend
But after trying all day trying to load that beast
I figured our friendship would end

"Oh hes gentle as he can be," he said
"Hell be easy to catch and load,"
After seeing the other horses round his place
Well I reckon I shoulda knowed

I walked right up and haltered that colt
He was easy to catch and lead
But the boogers that lived in my trailer
Were the worst that hed ever seed

He bowed up his back, snorted and blew
His ears lay back on his neck
And me with a nylon halter rope
I just knew I was in for a wreck

"Jump in the trailer and pull," my friend said
"Ill throw a rope round his rump"
That didnt work, he just sat down
It was like tryin' to pull out a stump

After several hours of cussin and sweat
We was 'bout to give up from the pain
When his daughter walked up and led that colt in
Followin a bucket of grain

Now I aint too proud to learn a new trick
Im willin to give new things a whirl
But that lesson was a hard one to swallow
A-comin from that little girl

So I asked her if shed ever worked with that colt
She said no, I just sit on the fence
And watch all you cowboys make fools of yourselves
Instead of just usin good sense

2011, Glenn Martin
This song may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

Glen told us, "This poem was written by me to honor every one of us that experienced trying to load a colt in a trailer for the first time. An experience Im sure most cowboys and ranchers have at least observed if not experienced. Where were the horse whisperers when we were growing up?"

 



About Glenn Martin:

Glenn W. Martin writes:

Raised in the ranching country of Eastern New Mexico.

Grew up working those ranches and rodeoing.

Attended Sul Ross College in Alpine, Texas; pre-vet with the idea of becoming a large animal vet.

Spent a year in Viet Nam as a Combat Medic and became interested in human medicine.

Worked as a Physician Assistant for over 30 years but never gave up my love for ranching life.

Have always loved the rich tradition and lore of the cowboy way of life. The many stories heard and life experiences lived while working the ranches of Eastern New Mexico have inspired me to relate in my poetry.

I currently now live on a small ranch near Durango, Colorado.
 
 
 

 

 


 

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