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Gail I. Gardner (1892-1988) was born in and died at Prescott, Arizona. Though he was educated at Philip Exeter Academy and Dartmouth University, his desire was to work as a cowboy, which he did. Later in life, he became the postmaster of Prescott.

Colorful stories have been written about Gail I. Gardner, notably by Katie Lee (see one here) and Warren Miller, past Curator of Education for the Sharlot Hall Museum. "A Brief Autobiography" is included in Gail Gardner's book, Orejana Bull; for Cowboys Only.

"The Sierry Petes (or Tying the Knots in the Devil's Tail)" by Gail I. Gardner is often the subject of questions directed to our Who Knows? feature. People frequently don't know the name of the tale, but they remember parts of the story. We get requests that say things such as "an old cowboy made this up and used to tell it to me," or  "my father wrote the poem," or "it's an anonymous Cowboy song."  

Gail Gardner continually battled the notion that the poem was "anonymous."  He wrote the poem in 1917 and it became an immediate favorite, recited and put to music by others, quickly entering the realm of "classic."

Our thanks to the Gardner family and grandson Gail Steiger for permissions and photos for this feature.

                                

Below:

Poems

The Sierry Petes (or Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail)

Real Cowboy Life

The Dude Wrangler

The Cowman's Troubles

Arizona August (separate page)


Related Books, Music, and More

Photos

 

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

 Gail I. Gardner at the Devil's Gate Rodeo Grounds,
Skull Valley, "Round-up Time" in the 1920s

See more photos below.

The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four features a photo of Gail Gardner as a child, from a tintype.

His own recitation of  "The Sierry Petes (or Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail)" is included on the CD, from a 1986 family recording. Gardner's grandson Gail Steiger also recites Gardner's "The Dude Wrangler" on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four.

 

 

Gail Gardner's wife, Delia Gist Gardner, also wrote poetrya fact discovered after her death. Her moving poem, “Hail and Farewell,” is delivered in a singular performance by Gail Steiger, songwriter, filmmaker, rancher, and the Gardners’ grandson on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two.

"The Sierry Petes (or Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail)" as recited by the late J. B Allen, is also featured on the 2007 CD, The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two from CowboyPoetry.com.


The Sierry Petes (or, Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail)

Away up high in the Sierry Petes,
Where the yeller pines grows tall,
Ole Sandy Bob an' Buster Jig,
Had a rodeer camp last fall.

Oh, they taken their hosses and runnin' irons
And maybe a dog or two,
An' they 'lowed they'd brand all the long-yered calves,
That come within their view.

And any old dogie that flapped long yeres,
An' didn't bush up by day,
Got his long yeres whittled an' his old hide scorched,
In a most artistic way.

Now one fine day ole Sandy Bob,
He throwed his seago down,
"I'm sick of the smell of burnin’ hair,
And I 'lows I'm a-goin' to town."

So they saddles up an' hits 'em a lope,
Fer it warnt no sight of a ride,
And them was the days when a Buckeroo
Could ile up his inside.

Oh, they starts her in at the Kaintucky Bar,
At the head of Whiskey Row,
And they winds up down by the Depot House,
Some forty drinks below.

They then sets up and turns around,
And goes her the other way,
An' to tell you the Gawd-forsaken truth,
Them boys got stewed that day.

As they was a-ridin' back to camp,
A-packin' a pretty good load,
Who should they meet but the Devil himself,
A-prancin' down the road.

Sez he, "You ornery cowboy skunks,
You'd better hunt yer holes,
Fer I've come up from Hell's Rim Rock,
To gather in yer souls."

Sez Sandy Bob, "Old Devil be damned,
We boys is kinda tight,
But you ain't a-goin' to gather no cowboy souls,
'Thout you has some kind of a fight."

So Sandy Bob punched a hole in his rope,
And he swang her straight and true,
He lapped it on to the Devil's horns,
An' he taken his dallies too.

Now Buster jig was a riata man,
With his gut-line coiled up neat,
So he shaken her out an' he built him a loop,
An' he lassed the Devil's hind feet.

Oh, they stretched him out an' they tailed him down,
While the irons was a-gettin hot,
They cropped and swaller-forked his yeres,
Then they branded him up a lot.

They pruned him up with a de-hornin' saw,
An' they knotted his tail fer a joke,
They then rid off and left him there,
Necked to a Black-Jack oak.

If you're ever up high in the Sierry Petes,
An' you hear one Hell of a wail,
You'll know it's that Devil a-bellerin' around,
About them knots in his tail.

Gail I. Gardner, 1917, from Orejana Bull
reprinted with permission of the Gardner/Steiger family
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission.

 

In a foreword to a 1950 edition of his book, Orejana Bull, Gail Gardner writes that "The Sierry Petes" was "...written as verse, and it never would have been sung at all if Bill Simon hadn't sized it up one day and decided it would do to sing. He started it and as it went pretty good, that started me to writing more "cow" songs. The author is no musician, in fact, he doesn't know one note from another, but he has a great deal of pleasure setting these songs to simple tunes and singing them to patient friends..."

As told in the introduction to The Big Roundup:

Gardner spent much effort defending his authorship, and in a 1977 article, folklorist Katie Lee tells of a particularly illustrative episode: Gardner was extremely displeased with Alan Lomax, whose first edition of  Folk Songs of North America “contained a new printing of ‘Sierry Petes’ with no credit, plus an inference of plagiarism” implying it was based on a poem by Badger Clark.  Gardner dashed off a letter to Lomax that included a memorable line that would put any editor on notice: “Professional singers of cowboy songs and editors have much in common, neither knows which end of a horse the hay goes in or which end of a cow gets up first ....”

Gardner is a favorite son of Prescott, Arizona, and "The Sierry Petes" takes place along Prescott's famous Whiskey Row, once a notorious strip of Cowboy saloons, visited by the likes of Wyatt Earp and Doc Holliday.  At one time there were 40 saloons, beginning with the Kentucky Bar and ending at the Depot House. In "The Sierry Petes ( or Tying the Knots in the Devil's Tail)," Old Sandy Bob and Buster Jig head there:

. . . 
Oh, they starts her in the Kaintucky Bar
At the head of Whiskey Row,
And they winds up down by the Depot House
Some forty drinks below 
. . .

In Cowboys and Cowboy Poets, Warren Miller writes about the autobiographical references in "The Sierry Petes"; Gardner and the "real" Sandy Bob had "attempted the popular local challenge — to down a drink in every one" of Prescott's saloons, and that Sandy Bob had "ventured the opinion that 'the devil gets cowboys for doin' what we done.'" 

The poem is published in Orejana Bull, a collection of Gail Gardner's poems now published by the Sharlot Hall Museum Press and edited by Warren Miller.  Orejana Bull was first printed in 1935.  The current (1987) edition includes photos and eight "new" poems that were written between 1935 and 1980.  The included "A Brief Autobiography" begins "My father came to Arizona in 1879..." and tells about his life and ranching experiences and how he came to write verses and songs. 

The current edition of Orejana Bull was published when Gail I. Gardner was 94, and Warren Miller's informed and personal foreword and annotations are indispensable aids to enjoying the twenty poems. Miller was the Education Director of the Sharlot Hall Museum in Prescott, Arizona and head of the Arizona Cowboy Poets Gathering that takes place there each summer.

Gail Gardner's own recitation of "The Sierry Petes" is included on the 2009 CD, The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four.

"The Sierry Petes" is recited by the late J. B. Allen, on the 2007 CD, The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two.

 

Real Cowboy Life

You have read these cowboy stories,
About their life so wild and free;
I expect that you could tell me
What a cowboy's life should be.
Oh, he rescues lovely maidens
And he shoots the rustlers down;
He wears a fancy outfit,
And he paints up every town.

You can see him in the movies,
He's a high-falutin' swell;
A-ridin' wring-tailed pintos,
And always raisin' Hell.
But now let me tell you somethin'
'Bout this cowboy life so free;
It ain't no bed of roses,
You can take a tip from me.

Now there ain't no handsome cowboys,
Nowhere I've ever been,
For a real top-notch Buckero
Is just homlier than sin.
And all cowboys have their troubles,
A few of which I'll name,
To show you that cowpunching
Is a mighty sorry game.

When the roundup starts in April,
The first job you undertake
Is to shoe up all your horses
Till you think your back will break.
Now then you can be a center,
Or a rimmy if you will;
It don't make any difference,
You will have your troubles still.

When you take your dally-welties
You can lose a lot of hide,
But if you fail to get 'em,
You have shorely got to ride.
Or you tie her hard and solid,
And then throw away the slack;
If your steer should hub a saplin',
You are shore to lose the pack.

When you get a wild bunch driftin',
Straight down for the home corral,
There will somethin' spook the leaders,
And your whole bunch go to Hell.
You build to an orejana,
For to tie him in a rush,
But your pony turns a knocker
And he throws you in the brush.

Then you long-ear's in the thicket,
And your dogs have plumb give out,
So the only thing that you can do
Is to cuss and cry and shout.
As you ride away and leave him,
You can hear the critter bawl,
And you know some feller'll git him
Before the rodeer comes next fall.

When you have a real hard winter,
And your cows all try to die,
You ride out every morning,
And to lift 'em up you try.
You can git one by the handle,
And you heave and lift and strain,
With a mighty awful struggle
You can tail her up again.

Oh, you try to leave her standin',
But she charges you in high,
Then she breaks down in the middle
So you leave her there to die.
On the range there's not a yearlin'
That is fat enough for meat,
And you are all burnt out on bacon,
And the beans ain't fit to eat.

When you've cowboyed for a lifetime,
Here is all 'twill do for you:
Some busted ribs and shoulders
And a hip knocked down or two.
You have butted into cedars
Till your hair is hard to find,
And the malapais and granites
Have you all stove up behind.

If you ever have a youngster,
And he wants to foller stock,
The best thing you can do for him
Is to brain him with a rock.
Or if rocks ain't very handy,
You kin shove him down the well;
Do not let him be a cowboy,
For he's better off in Hell.

You may swear you'll never ride again,
And know you will not fail,
Till you hear a cavviada
Come a-jinglin' down the trail.
Then you pack up all your soogans,
And prepare to pull your freight,
For you know you're just a cowboy,
And your head ain't screwed on straight

Gail I. Gardner, from Orejana Bull
reprinted with permission of the Gardner/Steiger family
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission.

 

The Dude Wrangler

I'll tell you of a sad, sad story,
Of how a cowboy fell from grace,
Now really this is something awful,
There never was so sad a case.

One time I had myself a pardner,
I never knowed one half so good;
We throwed our outfits in together,
And lived the way that cowboys should.

He savvied all about wild cattle,
And he was handy with a rope,
For a gentle, well-reined pony,
Just give me one that he had broke.

He never owned no clothes but Levis,
He wore them until they was slick,
And he never wore no great big Stetson,
'Cause where we rode the brush was thick.

He never had no time for women,
So bashful and so shy was he,
Besides he knowed that they was poison,
And so he always let them be.

Well he went to work on distant ranges;
I did not see him for a year.
But then I had no cause to worry,
For I knowed that some day he'd appear.

One day I rode in from the mountains,
A-feelin' good and steppin' light,
For I had just sold all my yearlin's,
And the price was out of sight.

But soon I seen a sight so awful,
It caused my joy to fade away,
It filled my very soul with sorrow,
I never will forgit that day.

For down the street there come a-walkin'
My oldtime pardner as of yore,
Although I know you will not believe me,
Let me tell you what he wore.

He had his boots outside his britches;
They was made of leather green and red.
His shirt was of a dozen colors,
Loud enough to wake the dead.

Around his neck he had a 'kerchief,
Knotted through a silver ring;
I swear to Gawd he had a wrist-watch,
Who ever heard of such a thing.

Sez I, "Old scout now what's the trouble?
You must have et some loco weed.
If you will tell me how to help you,
I'll git you anything you need."

Well he looked at me for half a minute,
And then he begin to bawl;
He sez, "Bear with me while I tell you
What made me take this awful fall.

"It was a woman from Chicago
Who put the Injun sign on me;
She told me that I was romantic,
And just as handsome as could be."

Sez he, "I'm 'fraid that there ain't nothin'
That you can do to save my hide,
I'm wranglin' dudes instead of cattle,
I'm what they call a first-class guide.

"Oh I saddles up their pump-tailed ponies,
I fix their stirrups for them too,
I boost them up into their saddles,
They give me tips when I am through.

"It's just like horses eatin' loco,
You can not quit it if you try,
I'll go on wranglin' dudes forever,
Until the day that I shall die."

So I drawed my gun and throwed it on him,
I had to turn my face away.
I shot him squarely through the middle,
And where he fell I left him lay.

I shorely hated for to do it,
For things that's done you cain't recall,
But when a cowboy turns dude wrangler,
He ain't no good no more at all.

Gail I. Gardner, from Orejana Bull
reprinted with permission of the Gardner/Steiger family
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission.

 

Gail Steiger, Gail I. Gardner's grandson, recites
"The Dude Wrangler," is included on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four.

The Cowman's Troubles

I used to make money a-runnin' wild cattle,
In them good old days 'fore the business went wrong,
When a hot runnin' iron and a good long riata
Was all that was needed to start you along.

I had no book-keeper to help run my outfit,
I just kept her all in a small tally book;
A Durham tobaccer sack held my spare money,
And I ran my layout all on my own hook.

And no one asked questions concerning my business,
I wouldn't have answered a one anyhow.
I just would have told them to go to the Devil.
But things is quite different with cattlemen now.

With the bankers and lawyers and the forest officials,
The land office men and inspectors as well,
A-ridin' the cowman all over the county,
No wonder his business has all gone to Hell.

For nowdays it seems that the whole durn creation
Has got to know everything under the sun,
They even keep cases on all of your dogies,
And they tell you the way that your outfit should run.

I went to a banker to borry some money,
When times they was hard and my pocket was low;
He looked over his glasses and he pulled his chin-whiskers,
And these was the things that he wanted to know:

"Who was your father and who was your mother?
And where were you born, and if so tell me why?
How many times have you been in the cooler?
And where do you think you will go when you die?"

"Then we'll mortgage your outfit at eight per cent interest,
I'm sure it's the only thing for you to do,
Go see our lawyer an' for five hundred dollars,
He'll draw up the papers and fix it for you."

There come to my ranch house a young forest ranger,
A slim scissor-bill in some leather puttees;
He had him a hatchet tied onto his saddle,
And all that he knowed was the herding of trees.

Well he got out a pencil and seventeen papers,
And spread them all out just as neat as could be,
He then looked as wise as a tree full of barn owls,
And these was the words that this man said to me:

"How many cattle have you on your ranges?
And how many head did you say you had sold?
Let's have your calf-tally with the steers and the heifers?
How many have you eat and how many have you stole?"

When you drive to the railroad to ship out some cattle,
You'll find the inspector a-hanging around;
He'll set on a fence post and chaw your tobaccer,
And these is some laws he is apt to lay down:

"Them critters that's packin' two irons must be vented,
And all of them calves must have mothers," says he,
The Board down in Phoenix claims all orejanas."
(But there's a Hell of a lot that they never do see.)

Oh the income tax hombre will ask you more questions,
The assessor will think up a dozen or two,
Each one of these buzzards cuts in on your bank roll,
And soon there is nothing at all left for you.

Now maybe the cowman's reward is in Heaven,
If Heaven is a place where a cowhand could go;
But I'll bet you my saddle that here's what would happen,
There would be forty things that Saint Peter must know.

"Oh, how many angels have you in your chorus?
And how many tunes on your harp can you play?
How many white robes have you got in your war bag?
How many gold streets have you dug up today?"

If there is no other place that is safe for the cowman,
I believe that a journey to Hell would be best,
Where they'd shovel him into the door of the furnace,
And there's where old cowman might get him some rest.

Gail I. Gardner, from Orejana Bull
reprinted with permission of the Gardner/Steiger family
This poem should not be reprinted or reposted without permission.


In a note in Orejana Bull, Gail Gardner writes, "To vent an iron is to invalidate a brand. If a calf has been branded with the wrong brand in error, the rightful owner marks it with his own brand; then he must ask the owner of the first brand to brand it again on the shoulder, thus venting the brand."
    
 

Photos

An image of Gail Gardner as a child is on the cover of The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four compilation CD, and his own recitation of "The Sierry Petes" is included on the CD. The photo is from a tintype, courtesy of the Gardner family and the Steiger family. Cowboy, songwriter, and filmmaker Gail Steiger is Gail Gardner's grandson. Gail Steiger shared a number of other family photos, posted below.


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Tintype of Gail Gardner; the image used for
The BAR-D Roundup cover:

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
 Gail I. Gardner at 19, reproduced by Gary Lewallen from a 1912 Gardner family photo

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Fraternity photo, class of 1914, Dartmouth College
Gail Gardner front row, far right
 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Front row, center, Gail Gardner, team captain

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Gardner attended University of Texas School of Military Aeronautics, 1918

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Caption reads "Gail Gardner in old strip-down family Ford he called "The Mercedes"

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Gail Gardner, Skull Valley, 1922 or1923

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Caption: "Force feeding with cotton seed meal to teach stock to eat cotton seed cake; Fred Garrett on ground, Gail Gardner on 'Jim'"

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

 
Gail I. Gardner at the Devil's Gate Rodeo Grounds,
Skull Valley, "Round-up Time" in the 1920s

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
 Gail I. Gardner at roundup at Devil's Gate, 1920s; horse is "Ben"




photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

At the rodeo, about 1938


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission

1975

 


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Delia Gist Gardner and Gail Gardner on their 50th wedding anniversary


photo courtesy the Gardner/Steiger family;
This photo should not be reprinted or reposted without permission
Gail Gardner with his grandchildren at Christmas, c. late 1950s

 

 

Related Books, Music, and Links

 

Click for Amazon  OREJANA BULL: For Cowboys Only by Gail I. Gardner, edited by Warren E. Miller

This book of Gail I. Gardner's poems was published by Sharlot Hall Museum Press in 1987. It includes an informative foreword by Warren Miller, 20 poems, photos, a brief autobiography, an appendix of music for selection poems, notes, and a "Glossary:  For the benefit of those who are not cowboys."  One of the included poems is "Cowboy Love Song," which Don Edwards performs in The Horse Whisperer

Gail Gardner first published Orejana Bull in 1935, and it was republished in other editions, including those in 1950, 1963.

This 1950 edition of Orejana Bull was printed for the fifteenth anniversary of The Desert Caballeros, "by our good friend and honorary life member Gail Gardner." In a foreword, Gail Gardner writes about "The Sierry Petes":

"...The first song [in the book] was written as verse, and it never would have been sung at all if Bill Simon hadn't sized it up one day and decided it would do to sing. He started it and as it went pretty good, that started me to writing more "cow" songs. The author is no musician, in fact, he doesn't know one note from another, but he has a great deal of pleasure setting these songs to simple tunes and singing them to patient friends..."


  Music historian and folk singer Katie Lee's award-winning documentary, The Last Wagon, feature Arizona cowboy legends Gail I. Gardner and Billy Simon. The lively film includes much footage of the two and their performances of songs including Gardner's "The Sierry Pete's," and "Real Cowboy Life," and Badger's Clark's "A Cowboy's Prayer" and "A Border Affair/Spanish is a Loving Tongue." All three join in swapping memories and tall tales at Gail Gardner's home. There are scenes of horseman Billy Simon working with his cutting and show horses, and conversations with his wife, Betty, a rodeo clown, at their horse camp.

Read more about the The Last Wagon and more about Katie Lee and her work at her web site.


  Smithsonian Folkways' Cowboy Poetry Classics (2003) includes a wonderful recitation of "The Sierry Petes" by Gail Gardner's grandson, Gail Steiger

Georgie Sicking recites Gail Gardner's "The Moonshine Steer" on this CD. (See the cross-referenced index of poets, poems and reciters on this CD in our anthology index and read a review here.) You can read more about the  CD at the Smithsonian Folkways site.


Katie Lee's 1960 interview (no longer available on the web) with Gail Gardner is a classic piece of reportage. It includes a slightly different, earlier version of "Sierry Petes" than the one published in Orejana Bull. A longer version of her 1960 visit with the Gail Gardner and his wife Delia and more of Gail Gardner's poems are included in Katie Lee's book:

Click for Amazon  Ten Thousand Goddam Cattle, A History of the American Cowboy in Song, Story, and Verse, by Katie Lee

There are many compelling stories about and references to Gail Gardner included in this book, which also includes the poems "The Sierry Petes," "Old Bach" (sometimes referred to as "Old Batch"), "Real Cowboy Life," "The Magic Jug," "The Dude Wrangler," "The Cowman's Troubles" and others.


  The Sharlot Hall Museum Audio Collection at the Arizona Memory Project includes audio interviews and commentary with Gail Gardner, available for listening on the web. They include "Reminiscences of Prohibition Days in Yavapai County (1968)"; "Frontier Days Past" (1969); an interview about "early Whiskey Row days, prices of drinks, gambling, prostitution, locations of saloons" (1961); "Cowboys at Work," described as "a discussion of equipment and clothing of the Yavapai cowboy," which includes his description of how "The Sierry Petes" was written (c. 1960); Oral Interview of Gail Gardner presented by Roger Anderson (1960); "Origin of the Smoki People"; "Katie Lee Sings Cowboy Songs with Gail Gardner"(1972) ; and "Interview of Gail Gardner by Charles Franklin Parker, August 17, 1959. Concerns Gardner's family, background, poetry, and writing." The collection is searchable.


 

  Gail Gardner's own recitation of "The Sierry Petes (or Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail)," from a 1986 family recording, is included on the The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four CD. Gardner's grandson Gail Steiger also recites Gardner's "The Dude Wrangler" on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Four. The CD cover features a photo of Gail Gardner as a child, from a tintype.


  "The Sierry Petes" is recited by the late J. B. Allen, on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two (2007).

Gardner's wife, Delia Gist Gardner, also wrote poetrya fact discovered after her death. Her moving poem, “Hail and Farewell,” is delivered in a singular performance by Gail Steiger, songwriter, filmmaker, rancher, and the Gardners’ grandson on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two.


The Folk Music Index housed on the web site of the Milton S. Eisenhower Library at Johns Hopkins University lists Gail Gardner as a principal performer on the following:


  Cattle Call; Early Cowboy Music and its Roots  Rounder Records

This album includes a version of "Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail" by Powder River Jack and Kitty Lee, recorded in 1930.

You can read the story of the recording on the Rounder Records site, where you can also listen to some selections from the album.  The album is also available from Amazon.com, where there are also sound clips.


Click to view at Amazon.com   Cowboy Poetry : A Gathering by Hal Cannon (Editor) by Hal Cannon (Editor)

This anthology includes Gail Gardner's "The Sierry Petes" and "The Dude Wrangler." 


Click for Amazon The Horse Whisperer Soundtrack

Don Edwards' "Cowboy Love Song" on The Horse Whisperer songtrack is based on Gail Gardner's poem with the same name. The poem is included in Orejana Bull.


A poem by Gail Gardner's wife Delia Gist Gardner is included in Cowgirl Poetry (and on The BAR-D Roundup: Volume Two): 

   Cowgirl Poetry edited by Virginia Bennett

In her introduction to Cowgirl Poetry, editor Virginia Bennett writes:  "Vintage writings were a rich discovery. 'Hail and Farewell,' found recited as a dramatic ending to Gail Steiger's CD of truthful cowboy music, was penned by Delia Gist Gardner, whose husband, Gail Gardner, wrote many classic cowboy poems, including 'The Sierry Petes,' (better known as 'Tying Knots in the Devil's Tail').  Steiger related that no one knew that his grandmother had been a writer, yet after her death, this single poem was found among her things."  See our feature about Cowgirl Poetry here.

 

 

 

 

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