Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

This is an additional page of coverage of the Western Folklife Center's 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

See page 1 here, which includes an index of pages.

 

Visit the Western Folklife Center web site for archived webcasts of events,  audio and video coverage, and more.


Below:

 Jeri Dobrowski's February, 2008 Cowboy Jam Session column from Tri-State Livestock News 

More from and about the Gathering (media releases, links, other publications' coverage)

 


Jld07.jpg (9383 bytes) Western journalist and photographer Jeri Dobrowski shares her Cowboy Jam Session column that first appeared in the Tri-State Livestock News:

 

Cowboy Jam Session: Western Culture News & Reviews

- by Jeri L. Dobrowski

February 2008

Western Folklife Center prepping for 25th anniversary

Snowstorms pummeled the western United States as folks headed to Elko, Nevada, for the 2008 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. Some bemoaned the fact that the gathering is held in winter. As I heard the story, organizers settled on late January as the time when ranchers could most easily get away from the demands of land and livestock. It’s a formula they’ve stuck with for 24 years.

The sponsoring Western Folklife Center, a regional nonprofit based in Elko with offices in Salt Lake City, is planning for the silver anniversary event January 24-31, 2009. They hinted at things to come in this year’s program: inviting all participants back for an ongoing reunion stage; recognition for those who have attended for 20 to 25 years; honoring deceased poets and musicians.

But, hold the phone, here’s what I consider the most exciting news to date: a performance tour of cowboy poetry and music that will play five sites in the western United States. There were rumors, but the Western Folklife Center (WFC) has made it official. The tour hits the road in the spring of 2009. They are looking for host communities.

Each site will host a two to three-day residency, including a concert, school program, writing workshop, and film screening. The WFC is looking for communities with small to medium-sized theaters and a community-based organization to assist on a local level. I encourage readers to find out more about this marvelous opportunity. Contact Meg Glaser or Christina Barr at (775) 738-7508 to get the ball rolling.

The WFC is open for business 12 months out of the year. It’s an oft-overlooked fact. WFC staff are busy year-round, documenting, preserving, and presenting the heritage of the American West. Resulting exhibits, films, radio programs, recordings, and public presentations are archived at www.westernfolklife.org.  If you haven’t spent time digging into what’s there, allow me to highlight a few of my favorites. 

A series of five-minute videos entitled The Art of Gearmaking profiles four cowboy craftsmen:  Doug Groves of Nevada’s TS Ranch demonstrating rawhide work; Mark Dahl, Starr Valley, Nevada, bit making; Doug Krause, Eaton, Colorado, mecate making; and Dale Harwood, Shelley, Idaho, leather carving. The videos, along with an in-depth discussion of cowboy gear, award-winning contest entries, and resources, are part of a larger exhibit entitled Back at the Ranch: an Artful Life. Start your tour at http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/batr/tools_landing.php

I reconnected with Sharon O’Toole at this year’s gathering, discussing the delicious leg of lamb that she and husband, Patrick, grilled for the Wyoming party. The O’Tooles ranch in Little Snake River Valley on the Wyoming-Colorado border. They are among a handful of diarists who log onto the WFC Web site with candid insights on life in the American West (earning them the title “Webloggers”). Blog authors welcome readers with customary Western hospitality, minus the coffee. Sharon faithfully posts her entries, augmented with powerful, workaday photos. You’re there as they calve heifers, rake hay, shear, supply the herder’s camp, and walk their daughter down the aisle at a ranch wedding: www.westernfolklife.org/weblogs/artists/sharono/

Three other notable Weblogs are those of John and Robbin Dofflemyer, ranchers from the Sierra Nevada foothills near Visalia, California: www.westernfolklife.org/weblogs/artists/dofflemyer/; Jeremiah Watt, Coalinga, California saddlemaker: www.westernfolklife.org/weblogs/artists/watt/; and Linda Dufurrena, photographer from Winnemucca, Nevada: www.westernfolklife.org/weblogs/artists/dufurrenal/.

Trying another technological term on you for size, let me tell you about the WFC’s Podcasts—something akin to a free radio show that’s available on the internet. You can listen to the programming on your computer or download it to an iPod or digital music player. The WFC’s first Podcast was a 1990 recording of  Texas poet Joel Nelson reciting Bruce Kiskaddon’s “When They Finish Shipping Cattle in the Fall.” The most recent features Don Edwards’ performance of the Jack Thorp classic, “Chopo.” To access Ranch Rhymes: Cowboy Poetry and Music from the Western Folklife Center, paste the following link into your browser: www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php?option=com_content&task=blogsection&id=24&Itemid=241.

I leave you with one last on-line jewel, the complete set of National Cowboy Poetry Gathering programs. I’m not talking a representative photo of the covers. No, the entire program from each of the past 24 years can be viewed in its entirety, along with the corresponding poster. You can also read or listen to the keynote address. Paste the following into your browser: http://www.westernfolklife.org/site1/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=100&Itemid=265

Submit items for consideration to Jeri Dobrowski, 1471 Carlyle Road S, Beach, ND 58621; jamsession@robscabinets.com.

© 2008, Jeri Dobrowski, All rights reserved
This column also appears in the Tri-State Livestock News

 


 

More from and about the Gathering

Below:

Gathering Moments on Film 

Gathering Cybercasts 


Pre-Gathering news:

Tickets, Performers, Links to the Western Folklife Center

Daily Schedule of Events

Open Mic Opportunities 

Ranch Rhymes preview of Don Edwards' Ghost of Jack Thorp 

Western Folklife Center Media Release: "National Cowboy Poetry Gathering Exhibit Features Ranching Culture in Sonora, Mexico" 

Western Folklife Center Media Release: "Vaqueros and Corridos at 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering"
 


Elko Daily Free Press 

Nevada magazine feature  


 

  The Western Folklife Center presents "shoot-from-the-hip videos," available for on-line viewing. They comment, "This year, we checked out Handlebars and Horseshoes, caught Don Beto Cruz and Jesus Garcia sharing a classic Sonoran horse racing corrido, and dropped in on a workshop— Yodeling with Wylie!"

You can view the videos (and additional videos from 2007) here at the Western Folklife Center web site and here on YouTube.

 


  Broadcasts from the Elko Convention Center auditorium shows at the 24th Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering are available on the audio and video cybercasts at the Western Folklife Center web site. There are recordings of performances that took place Wednesday, January 30 through Saturday, February 2.

(You can also find archived cybercasts from the 2007 Gathering here at the Western Folklife Center web site.)

 


Pre-Gathering news:

 

   Tickets for the Western Folklife Center's 24th Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (January 26-February 2, 2008) are available for sale on line (and by phone and mail). Find information about ticket sales here.

The 2008 gathering theme is "The New West: Grabbing the Future by the Horns," and will include "guests with Mexican roots to the Gathering, from Mexico and around the West, to look at vaquero traditions in the northwestern Mexican states of Sonora and northern Sinaloa..." The gathering is a week-long "celebration of life in the rural West, featuring the contemporary and traditional arts of western ranching culture."

Some of the first-time invited poets to the 2008 Gathering include Linda Kirkpatrick, Andy Nelson, and Diane Tribitt. Other performers include Baxter Black, Jerry "Brooksie" Brooks, Doris Daley, Stephanie Davis, Don Edwards, Juni Fisher, The Gillette Brothers, DW Groethe, R. W. Hampton, Brenn Hill, Yvonne Hollenbeck, Ross Knox, Wallace McRae, Waddie Mitchell, Joel Nelson, Rodney Nelson, Glenn Ohrlin, Bob Petermann, Vess Quinlan, Henry Real Bird, Pat Richardson, Kent Rollins, Tom Russell, Bob Schild, Sandy Seaton, Georgie Sicking, Jesse Smith, Sons and Brothers, Sourdough Slim, Red Steagall, Ian Tyson, Jack Walther, Wylie and the Wild West, Paul Zarzyski, and many others. See the entire list of performers with bios and photos here at the Western Folklife Center site.

You can view the daily schedule of events at the Western Folklife Center web site.

Find reports and photos from the 2007 gathering here at the BAR-D.

Read all about the 24th Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering here at the Western Folklife Center site.

 


  The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering offers all poets open mic opportunities in sessions on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday (January 30-February1) at the Elko Convention Center. Poets are invited to sign up for the sessions each morning. This year, for the first time, poets will be selected for a "Highlights from the Open-Mic Sessions" program at the Western Folklife Center, On Saturday, February 1 at 3:30 pm, hosted by Mike Christensen and Nan McIntire.

Read a report from California poet Janice Gilbertson (pictured above) about the open mic sessions at the 2007 Gathering here. Janice Gilbertson was an invited performer to the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in 2004.

Open mic sessions are recorded. Recently, one of Utah poet Jo Lynne Kirkwood's 2007 open mic performances was featured on the Western Folklife Center's Ranch Rhymes: Cowboy Poetry and Music from the Western Folklife Center Archives.

The program was described on the Western Folklife Center's web site:

Some of the best poems and songs at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering are performed each year in the smaller venues at Elko—the "Take Your Turn" and "Anything Goes" sessions. Jo Lynne Kirkwood's poem "The Auction" is just such a poem that stood out at last year's Gathering....

You can listen to Jo Lynne Kirkwood on the Ranch Rhymes audio here and read more about all of the archived broadcasts, which are also available as podcasts, here at the Western Folklife Center site.

 


  The newest Ranch Rhymes: Cowboy Poetry and Music from the Western Folklife Center Archives podcast features respected cowboy troubadour and music historian Don Edwards, performing "Chopo."  Don Edwards presents The Ghost of Jack Thorp at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering on January 31 and February 2, 2008, and the show will be broadcast on the Gathering's cybercast, available live on the web and archived for viewing on demand. The Western Folklife Center site explains:

Celebrating the 100th anniversary of the very first published collection of American folk songs, Songs of the Cowboys, Texas troubadour Don Edwards has created a musical tribute to cowboy, songwriter and ballad collector Jack Thorp for the 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering! Catch a sneak preview in Don's 2003 Gathering performance of Thorp's classic song, "Chopo," on this episode of Ranch Rhymes.

(See our features about Jack Thorp here, and find the words to "Chopo" and more about the song in our feature and selections from Jack Thorp's 1921 edition of Songs of the Cowboys here.)

The Ranch Rhymes recordings, presented by Ross Fuqua, are drawn from the Western Folklife Center Archives. The broadcasts are available on demand for listening on the web or for downloading as podcasts.

Other recent Ranch Rhymes programs feature Australian bush poet Milton Taylor and Washington poet Dick Warwick; Utah poet Jo Lynne Kirkwood; Montana ranch hand, singer, songwriter, and poet DW Groethe; and the late cowboy, poet, and reciter Sunny Hancock.

Find all of the Ranch Rhymes programs here at the Western Folklife Center web site.

[photo by Donald Kallaus]


  Media release, January, 2008:

 

National Cowboy Poetry Gathering Exhibit Features Ranching Culture in Sonora, Mexico
 

Elko -- The National Cowboy Poetry Gathering--the premiere festival celebrating the expressive arts of ranching and cowboy culture -- observes its 24th year beginning Saturday, January 26 and running through Saturday, February 2, 2008 in Elko, Nevada. This year, the Western Folklife Center, producer of this signature event, welcomes vaqueros, musicians and gearmakers from the Sonora region of northern Mexico and the western United States to the Gathering, where we will celebrate our shared legacies of land and livestock, enjoy our traditions of poetry and music, and explore the future of ranching culture and the West.

Each year during the Gathering, the Western Folklife Center presents exhibits in its Wiegand Gallery. Starting January 26 through September 20, 2008, the Folklife Center will present The Rugged, Beautiful World of the Sonoran Vaquero, a collection of photography and handcrafted objects that offers a glimpse of the world of working people making their living on the land today in Sonora, Mexico. This is a region that prides itself on its cattle -- exporting more than any other state in the country -- and this cowboy identity permeates its everyday atmosphere.

The Rugged, Beautiful World of the Sonoran Vaquero also brings into focus the dramatic terrain and associated plant life that supports ranching in northwestern Mexico, and the quiet settlements along river valleys that are home for much of this region's craft, agricultural and horseback work. Factory produced and U.S.-made products have found a shelf in the marketplace even in the most isolated corners of Sonora, yet hand-crafted, locally made work is still valued and often necessary. Look for gearmakers in these small towns, and you will often end up in a backyard workshop of someone's home, in the shade of a tree, tarp or shed roof. Outdoor workshops are well-suited for this desert climate, and in this exhibit you will see some of the sturdy craftsmanship that has emerged from these workshops -- gear built for everyday use with the resources at hand and with the working person's budget in mind. Curated by folklorist Jim Griffith with Western Folklife Center staff Meg Glaser and Christina Barr, this exhibit features the photography of Jim Griffith, David Burckhalter, Meg Glaser, Guy de Gallard and others.

An opening reception for this new exhibit will take place during the 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering on Thursday, January 31, at 3:30 pm for Western Folklife Center members and 4:30 pm for the general public. Refreshments will be provided by the Red Lion Hotel & Casino, Silver State Liquor and Wine and the Elko County Cattlewomen. Live entertainment will be provided by New Frontier and Mindi Reid.

Also in the Wiegand Gallery is Buckaroo! The Hispanic Heritage of the High Desert, a tale that began far from this landscape of rimrock and sagebrush. Distinguished by regional customs of horsemanship, language, and style of dress, buckaroos are a society within their desert communities of eastern California, northern Nevada, southwestern Idaho and eastern Oregon. Their story has evolved across 700 years and three continents. This exhibit was produced by the High Desert Museum in Bend, Oregon, and curated by Robert Boyd, the museum's Western History Curator. Through this unique collection of artifacts and photography, including the striking photography of Kurt Markus and Charles A. Blakeslee, visitors have an opportunity to gain a deeper understanding of the buckaroo way of life.

In addition to the exhibits in the Wiegand Gallery, the Western Folklife Center will also present the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering Student Art Show in the G Three Bar Theater. This installation of Elko County student artwork showcases the talents of students from kindergarten through high school. This year's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering theme, "The New West: Grabbing the Future by the Horns," has inspired a wide range of creative expression, from plaster masks to photography to drawings and collages.

***

The purpose of the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering -- known simply as "Elko" to many -- is to present and preserve the traditional and contemporary arts created by people living close to the land in the American West. Through poetry, music, stories, handcrafted gear, film, photography, food and more, the Western Folklife Center strives to convey the richness as well as the challenges of rural life in the West. In recent years, discussions of rural issues have become an integral part of the Gathering, as leaders in the conservation movement have come together with ranchers to find much common ground in an atmosphere of collaboration and concern for the future of the West.

Started in 1985 by a small group of folklorists, poets and musicians, the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering has become an annual ritual for thousands of people who value and practice the artistic traditions of the region, and are concerned about the present and future of the West. Hundreds of cowboy poetry gatherings have since taken hold across the West and the nation over the last 23 years, as the Elko Gathering has reinvigorated a tradition that never ceased to be a part of the lives of cowboys, ranchers and rural westerners. In 2000, the U.S. Senate recognized the cultural value of this tradition and the event responsible for its renaissance when it passed a resolution naming the Elko Gathering the "National" Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

The Gathering will feature performances by close to 60 poets, musicians and musical groups, including new faces and returning favorites (see list below). Special exhibits, workshops, films, lectures, panel discussions, ranch dances and late-night jam sessions, all contribute to the depth, richness and authenticity of this one-of-a-kind event. For more information about the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, please visit the Western Folklife Center website at www.westernfolklife.org.

Major sponsors of the Gathering include the Bretzlaff Foundation, City of Elko, Community Foundation of Southern Arizona, Elko County Recreation Board, Ford Foundation, International Game Technology, National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Commission on Tourism, Nevada Humanities, Nevada Arts Council, The Southwest Center at the University of Arizona, the Wallace Foundation, and many more.

The mission of the Western Folklife Center is to enhance the vitality of American life through the experience, understanding, and appreciation of the diverse cultural heritage of the American West.

2008 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering Performers
 

Oscar Auker, Goodnight, Texas; Baxter Black, Benson, Arizona; Dave Bourne, Agoura Hills, California; Jerry Brooks, Sevier, Utah; Cow Bop, Carmel, California; Vince Crofts and Mindi Reid, Firth, Idaho; Doris Daley, Calgary, Alberta, Canada; Stephanie Davis, Columbus, Montana; John Dofflemyer, Lemon Cove, California; Don Edwards, Hico, Texas; Juni Fisher, Franklin, Tennessee; Dick Gibford, Maricopa, California; The Gillette Brothers, Crockett, Texas; Sharon Glenn, Yakima, Washington; DW Groethe, Bainville, Montana; Jennifer Haig, Eulo, Queensland, Australia; R.W. Hampton, Cimarron, New Mexico; Joni Harms, Canby, Oregon; Don Hedgpeth, Medina, Texas; Brenn Hill, Hooper, Utah; Yvonne Hollenbeck, Clearfield, South Dakota; Linda Kirkpatrick, Leakey, Texas; Echo Roy Klaproth, Shoshoni, Wyoming; Ross Knox, Tucson, Arizona; Mike Logan, Helena, Montana; Bill Lowman, Sentinel Butte, North Dakota; Ginny Mac, Fort Worth, Texas; Dylan Marchetti, Cathey's Valley, California; Wallace McRae, Forsyth, Montana; Waddie Mitchell, Jiggs, Nevada; Clark Morris, Lakeview, Oregon; Andy Nelson, Pinedale, Wyoming; Joel Nelson, Alpine, Texas; Rodney Nelson, Almont, North Dakota; New Frontier, Dillon and Bozeman, Montana; Glenn Ohrlin, Mountain View, Arkansas; Bob Petermann, Wibaux, Montana; The Quebe Sisters Band, Burleson, Texas; Vess Quinlan, San Acacio, Colorado; Henry Real Bird, Garryowen, Montana; Pat Richardson, Merced, California; Randy Rieman, Dillon, Montana; Kent Rollins, Hollis, Oklahoma; Tom Russell, Canutillo, Texas; Bob Schild, Blackfoot, Idaho; Sandy Seaton, Emigrant, Montana; Georgie Sicking, Kaycee, Wyoming; Jesse Smith, Cora, Wyoming; Sons and Brothers, Custer County, Colorado; Sourdough Slim, Paradise, California; Red Steagall, Fort Worth, Texas; Diane Tribitt, Hillman, Minnesota; Ian Tyson, Longview, Alberta, Canada; Jack Walther, Lamoille, Nevada; Wylie and the Wild West, Dusty, Washington; Paul Zarzyski, Great Falls, Montana


  Media release, December 2007:

 

Vaqueros and Corridos at 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering

 
 
Vaqueros and Corridos from Mexico and the U.S.
Featured at the
24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering
 

ElkoThe National Cowboy Poetry Gathering ‑‑ the premiere festival celebrating the expressive arts of ranching and cowboy culture ‑‑ observes its 24th year beginning Saturday, January 26 and running through Saturday, February 2, 2008 in Elko, Nevada. This year, the Western Folklife Center, producer of this signature event, welcomes vaqueros from the Sonora region of northern Mexico and the western United States to the Gathering, where we will celebrate our shared legacies of land and livestock, enjoy our traditions of poetry and music, and explore the future of ranching culture and the West.

The 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering will also feature corridos, a traditional Mexican ballad popular in the rural ranching communities of Sonora, Mexico and also performed in Mexican-American communities across the United States. Corridos convey stories of places and people key to understanding a community’s social values and cultural heritage. And like cowboy poetry, older classic corridos continue to find relevance alongside newly composed corridos about contemporary concerns.

This Mexican cultural program is part of the Western Folklife Center’s effort to invite cowboys from other parts of the world ‑‑ including Australia, the British Isles, Mongolia, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina and France ‑‑ to the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering to share their culture with their counterparts in the U.S. “For several years now, we’ve been conducting these cultural exchanges, and they have become an important part of the Gathering,” explains Charlie Seemann, Western Folklife Center executive director. “Our guests teach us that we may be continents and oceans apart, but we share basic philosophies and principles common to horse and cattle culture. And despite language barriers, we can communicate through music, poetry, foodways and the other traditional arts that sustain and inspire us all.”

The Mexican program at the 2008 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering will feature rancher Don Beto Cruz, who will travel from the remote village of Cucurpe in northern Sonora to share his repertoire of corridos including “El Huaraqui,” a ballad about a good horse trainer who was thrown off his horse and killed, and “El Corrido de Luís Donaldo Colosio,” about the assassination of Colosio, a presidential candidate, and written and composed by Don Beto.

Cruz will perform with fellow Sonoran Jesús Garcia, who is known for his collection of songs about legendary vaqueros, horses and horse races, cattle rustlers and local tragedies. Members of the musical group Pablo y su Ventarron will perform songs from their home state of Jalisco, as well as their own songs about significant events taking place in their new home of Elko, Nevada.

In addition to these performers, the 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering will also feature the following programs related to Mexican ranching culture:

Presentations of Mexican culture would not be complete without food. The 2008 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering will offer workshops and demonstrations of traditional foodways from Mexico. The Savor Sonora cooking workshop will highlight the region’s thin, grand-sized handmade flour tortillas, carne asada and green chile salsa. Make a Mexican Home-Style Brunch will include traditional family recipes and stories.

Other workshops scheduled during the Gathering that focus on Mexican vaquero traditions include Horsehair Rope Making – Sonora Style with vaquero rope maker Jesús Garcia, a corrido songwriting workshop for youth presented by ethnomusicologist Juan Díes, and a Latin dance workshop for beginners. An evening dance will feature spirited south-of-the-border music including rancheras, polkas, waltzes and more.

The Western Folklife Center’s Wiegand Gallery will feature Vaquero!, an exhibit showcasing ranch-related photographs and hand-crafted artifacts of Mexican and Mexican-American vaqueros living and working in the Pacific Northwest, the Great Basin and the Sonora and Sinaloa regions of Mexico.

In an effort to encourage discourse and solutions to shared problems, ranchers from both sides of the border will come together in a roundtable discussion to consider common issues of environmental and economic sustainability, and to share characteristics unique to ranching in Sonora, Mexico.

Folklorist Norma Elia Cantú will give the 2008 Humanities Lecture. A professor of English at the University of Texas at San Antonio, Cantú has published extensively in the fields of folklore and literary studies. She will use her own family history and scholarship to connect vaquero culture and work style with that of the American cowboy and show how the poetry and literature of the West has been influenced by these traditions.

The purpose of the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering ‑‑ known simply as “Elko” to many ‑‑ is to present and preserve the traditional and contemporary arts created by people living close to the land in the American West. Through poetry, music, stories, handcrafted gear, film, photography, food and more, the Western Folklife Center strives to convey the richness as well as the challenges of rural life in the West. In recent years, discussions of rural issues have become an integral part of the Gathering, as leaders in the conservation movement have come together with ranchers to find much common ground in an atmosphere of collaboration and concern for the future of the West.

Started in 1985 by a small group of folklorists, poets and musicians, the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering has become an annual ritual for thousands of people who value and practice the artistic traditions of the region, and are concerned about the present and future of the West. Hundreds of cowboy poetry gatherings have since taken hold across the West and the nation over the last 23 years, as the Elko Gathering has reinvigorated a tradition that never ceased to be a part of the lives of cowboys, ranchers and rural westerners. In 2000, the U.S. Senate recognized the cultural value of this tradition and the event responsible for its renaissance when it passed a resolution naming the Elko Gathering the “National” Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

The Gathering will feature performances by close to 60 poets, musicians and musical groups, including new faces and returning favorites (see attached list). Special exhibits, workshops, films, lectures, panel discussions, ranch dances and late-night jam sessions, all contribute to the depth, richness and authenticity of this one-of-a-kind event.

For more information about ticketed shows and workshops at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, please refer to our website at www.westernfolklife.org.

Major sponsors of the Gathering include the Bretzlaff Foundation, City of Elko, Community Foundation of Southern Arizona, Elko County Recreation Board, Ford Foundation, International Game Technology, National Endowment for the Arts, Nevada Commission on Tourism, Nevada Humanities, Nevada Arts Council, The Southwest Center at the University of Arizona, the Wallace Foundation, and many more.

The mission of the Western Folklife Center is to enhance the vitality of American life through the experience, understanding, and appreciation of the diverse cultural heritage of the American West.

 


 

  On the Clear Out West (C. O. W.) radio show for the week of February 11, 2008, hosted by Jim and Andy Nelson, the C.O.W. Boys "are reporting on their annual trip to the 24th National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in Elko, Nevada. Along with the report on the wonderful gathering, you'll also hear some great music from Sons & Brothers ("Buckaroo Dream"), Bob Petermann ("Cowboy's Prayer"), DW Groethe ("Give Him a Horse and a Saddle"), and Don Edwards ("The Old Cowman")... a lot of great cowboy poetry this week from Yvonne Hollenbeck ("The Old Felt Hat"), Waddie Mitchell ("Harsh Words"), Linda Kirkpatrick ("When Roundup Time Comes Round"), and Milton Taylor ("The Pearl of them All")..."

Clear Out West (C. O. W.) radio is broadcast to many radio stations and past shows are available for listening on demand from the Clear Out West web site  

The show always includes many good cowboy poetry and Western music selections, the popular "Dick's Pick" (a vintage cowboy music piece), "Farrier's File," "This Week in the Old West," and the generally hilarious and unpredictable banter and antics of the Nelson brothers. 

[photo by Stuart Johnson]


  The Elko Daily Free Press has stories, audio, and video from the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering on their web site.

The newspaper printed a special insert with poetry selected from CowboyPoetry.com, by poets Joel Nelson, Rodney Nelson, DW Groethe, Sandy Seaton, Paul Zarzyski, and Stephanie Davis. The insert also included an article by Algi Helgoth, "How 'Bout Them Cowgirls," which featured Diane Tribitt, Yvonne Hollenbeck, and Echo Klaproth. Most of the accompanying photos are by Jeri Dobrowski.


   The February, 2008 issue of Nevada magazine features cowboy poetry and the Western Folklife Center's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in an article with poems by Doris Daley, Joel Nelson, Wallace McRae, Paul Zarzyski, and Linda Hussa, illustrated with striking photos by several photographers and poets' portraits by veteran Elko photographer Charlie Ekburg. Other items and articles feature Wylie Gustafson of Wylie & the Wild West, top Western photographer Linda Dufurrena, and Elko saddlemakers Eddie Brooks and John Wright.

Many additional features are included in the issue that "celebrates our Western heritage with iconic photos, cowboy poetry, and stories about a guest ranch, living on the land, and cooking the cowboy way—in a Dutch oven."

Visit the Nevada magazine web site for online features and additional information.


 

More about the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering 
posted here at the BAR-D

 





 


With special thanks to Archivist Steve Green of Western Folklife Center, in a feature celebrating the 20th Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, we have program information that includes program covers, information and lists of invited performers for each year's Gathering.  

Other features in that section include:

  • recollections from the performers and from the audience about their "first time" at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.
  • poems celebrating the Gathering

We also maintain an index of all of the invited performers to the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, since its inception in 1985.  

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

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