Featured at the Bar-D Ranch

This is an additional page of coverage of the Western Folklife Center's 23rd National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.

See page 1 here, which includes an index of pages.

 

Visit the Western Folklife Center web site for archived webcasts of events,  audio and video coverage, and more.


Below:

Jeri Dobrowksi's photos

More photos

Some poetry heard at the Gathering

Photos from the Gathering

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Special thanks to Jeri Dobrowksi (at right, pictured with Juni Fisher) for her photos below.

View more photos from Elko at her site here, where prints are available.

 



Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Wylie Gustafson of Wylie & the Wild West chats with the captivating Brigid of Helena. Brigid recites Wallace McRae's "Maggie" and Paul Zarzyski's "Antipasto" with style, and sings and yodels. When asked how she got interested in cowboy poetry and Western music, she replied that Tom Russell is her best friend.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
A session of Montana poetry and music included Henry Real Bird, Paul Zarzyski, Sandy Seaton, Bob Petermann, and Stephanie Davis, shown with hosts Alex Swaney and Liz Dear.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
A session with poets and musicians from the Great Plains included DW Groethe, Ken Cook, Rodney Nelson, Alex Swaney (host) and Yvonne Hollenbeck.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Elizabeth and Eddie Kilroy, familiar voices on XM Radio, Channel 13
and Earl Longo, Gathering transportation ace and friend to thousands.  Eddie showcases Western music and cowboy poetry on XM radio's Willie's Cowboy Gathering.  Earl is a longtime XM Radio listener, and likes it so much that he convinced the mining company he works for to buy and install radios in the mines' fleet of trucks, all 300.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Wallace McRae and Bette Ramsey at the Montana party; Wally McRae shared Rocky Mountain oysters he had kept frozen from his last year's branding.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Wylie Gustafson of Wylie & the Wild West talks with Sally Smith, in her booth of Joelle Smith's work at the art and gear show.

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Western Folklife Center Founding Director Hal Cannon and Executive Director Charlie Seemann

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
Saturday night at the Pioneer Saloon at the Western Folklife Center: DW Groethe, Dave Stamey, Ramblin' Jack Elliot, and Gail Steiger

 


Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski used with permission. 
A number of friends got together for an impromptu dinner on Saturday night, poets, musicians, and their family members, spouses, and friends, including Andy Richardson, Will Stearns,  Bob Petermann, Jim Cardwell, Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns, Dennis Gaines, DW Groethe, Jay Snider, Sandi Snider,  Janice Gilbertson, Smoke Wade, Nanc Cook, Ken Cook, Stan Howe, Jeri L. Dobrowski, Bob Schild, Kay Petermann and her sister Dolly, Georgie Sicking, Yvonne Hollenbeck, Susan Parker, Pat Richardson, and others


More Photos


photo courtesy of Yvonne Hollenbeck
  Bob Petermann, who opened for Baxter Black's show, 
holds the newspaper with his front-page photo

 


photo courtesy of Yvonne Hollenbeck
Long-time friends Colen Sweeten and Bob Schild

 


photo courtesy of Yvonne Hollenbeck
Pat Richardson and Georgie Sicking

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Yvonne Hollenbeck and Rodney Nelson in the "Both Sides of the Fence Show"

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Yvonne Hollenbeck and Rodney Nelson in the "Both Sides of the Fence Show"

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Paulette Tcherkassky and Jerry "Brooksie" Brooks

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Michael Kirkwood, Michael Babiarz, Dave Stamey, and Michael Tcherkassky

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Michael Tcherkassky, Juni Fisher, and Ramblin' Jack Elliot

 


photo courtesy of Paulette Tcherkassky
Paulette Tcherkassky and Bimbo Cheney

 

 


See other photos in reports. See page 1 here, which includes an index of pages.


Poetry heard at the Gathering

Our regular poetry updates in January, February, and March 2007 include some of the selections recited at the Gathering by poets and reciters featured at CowboyPoetry.com:

 

  The Long Eared Bull is included in Bruce Kiskaddon's 1924 book, Rhymes of the Ranges; in his 1947 Rhymes of the Ranges and Other Poems; in Cowboy Miner Production's collection of Kiskaddon's poems, Cowboy Poetry: Classic Rhymes by Bruce Kiskaddon, and the new, monumental volume, Open Range, edited by Bill Siems. Open Range collects Kiskaddon's entire poetic output of over 480 poems, with some printed for the first time. 

Master reciter Ross Knox gave a flawless performance of "The Long Eared Bull" at the Open Range official release event at the recent 2007 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. Ross Knox told the audience that he wanted to recite some of the lesser known, excellent Kiskaddon poems at that event.

Read more about Open Range here and at the Open Range web site. The book is also the subject of Jeri Dobrowski's February, 2007 Cowboy Jam Session column here.


  Most of the top reciters include Henry Herbert Knibbs' moving poem, Where the Ponies Come to Drink, in their repertoire. One of the masters, Joel Nelson, gave an impeccable performance of the poem in a session at the recent National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. You can see and hear his recitation in an archived cybercast of the Saturday evening show at the Western Folklife Center web site.

The poem was first included in Knibbs' 1914 book, Songs of the Outlands: Ballads of the Hoboes and Other Verse.

Posted 2/25


  Ken Cook was invited to perform at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, and he recited his poem, Grandpa in one session.

Previously, Ken told us about the inspiration for the poem: "During the 1980's at Buckles Ranch we sold yearlings right off the place. Grandpa Buckles and I moved thousands of steers from holding pens to the scales to be weighed over the years. Cattle buyers would nervously pace from the scale house to the door watching the cattle, the weights, and the number of head. Grandpa would always have the final word on the sale of the cattle and the price. More than once I watched him 'gain a dime or two.' No matter what time of year it was and regardless of our feed supply or grass conditions...cattle needed bought or sold according to my Grandpa."

Read Ken's report on his experience at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in our feature here.

[Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski]

Posted 2/21


ej7brooksie.jpg (22183 bytes)  Top reciter Jerry "Brooksie" Brooks opened her first night's performance at the recent 2007 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering with Badger Clark's poem, From Town, which is included in his 1915 book, Sun and Saddle Leather.

We're the children of the open and we hate the haunts o' men,
   But we had to come to town to get the mail.
And we're ridin' home at daybreak—'cause the air is cooler then—
   All 'cept one of us that stopped behind in jail.

[Photo by Jeri L. Dobrowski from Elko, 2007; used with permission. View more photos from Elko at her site here. ]

Posted 2/19



  Utah poet Jo Lynne Kirkwood performed at the open sessions at this year's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, to particularly appreciative audiences. One of the poems she recited was The Auction, which was singled out by Janice Gilbertson in her report from Elko, here

Posted 2/19


  In a session about ranch women at the recent 2007 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, Rhonda Sedgwick Stearns recited S. Omar Barker's poem, Ranchman's Widow.

She's got one son a doctor,
And a daughter teachin' Latin.
Her youngest, he's a lawyer,
And she thinks a heap of that 'un.
But one's a cow ranch foreman,
And it makes her kinder glad,
For the way he sets the saddle
Just reminds her of his dad.
...

Posted 2/12


  In another session at the recent National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, crowd favorite Yvonne Hollenbeck recited her poem, Rancher Wannabe. You can listen to the show on the Western Folklife Center's cybercast (Thursday afternoon). Yvonne wrote the poem particularly for this year's Gathering theme, which was "The Ranch."

Posted 2/12


  California's Janice Gilbertson performed at the open sessions at this year's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering (and she covered some of the events; look for her reports with our Elko coverage start next week). Janice was an invited performer to the gathering in 2004.  One of the poems she performed this year was Giving Into Lonesome.

Posted 2/16


  Bruce Kiskaddon included Hook 'em Cow in his 1947 book, Rhymes of the Ranges and Other Poems:

You read of fierce bulls in the stories and books,
But you don't hear a heap 'bout an old cow that hooks.
....

Master reciter Ross Knox performed the poem at an exciting event at the recent 2007 National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, where Bill Siems (Bruce Kiskaddon, Shorty's Yarns, 2004)) officially released Open Range—a collection over four years in the making.  Kiskaddon, the poet whose poems are probably the most-widely recited, wrote over 480 poems. Many of those poems are collected for the first time in Open Range. Ross Knox told us that he wanted to recite some of the lesser known, yet excellent Kiskaddon poems at that event, and we'll be including one of his other choices next week.

Read more about Open Range above, in Jeri Dobrowski's latest Cowboy Jam Session column here, and at the Open Range web site.

Posted 2/5


Dennis_Gaines_trimmed_bw.jpg (58891 bytes) Texas cowboy, poet, and storyteller Dennis Gaines was featured at this year's National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. In a session called "Come Listen to My Story," he performed (with Dennis, it goes way beyond mere "reciting") his poem Ty Murray, Eat Your Heart Out.

There's a picture of Dennis and a bit more about his performance at Elko in a recent article at the Reno Gazette Journal, here. In an example of brilliant programming, the session also included Jay Snider and Pat Richardson, and may well have been the most all-out-fun-never-a-dull-moment show of the entire event.

[photo by Scott Hill Bumgardner]

Posted 2/5


  Jay Snider made his second appearance at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering in 2007. As mentioned above with Dennis Gaines' poem, Jay appeared with Dennis and Pat Richardson in one of the standout sessions. Jay held the audience's attention with a flawless performance of his rodeo poem, My Old Amigo Lum.

Posted 2/7


  Respected poet and top reciter Joel Nelson was a part of an excellent show at the recent National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, "Hooves of the Horses," which also included DW Groethe and Wylie and the Wild West. At one inspired part of the program, Joel's recitation of his poem, "Equus Caballus," was followed by Wylie & the Wild West's version of the poem set to music (from their Hooves of the Horses album). Another of Joel's impressive recitations was Jeff Streeby's poem, John Siversten the Farrier's Horse.

You can watch the entire show on the archived cybercast (Saturday evening) at the Western Folklife Center web site.

Posted 2/9


 

Visit the Western Folklife Center web site for archived webcasts of events,  audio and video coverage, and more.

 


More about the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering 
posted here at the BAR-D

 





 


With special thanks to Archivist Steve Green of Western Folklife Center, in a feature celebrating the 20th Annual National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, we have program information that includes program covers, information and lists of invited performers for each year's Gathering.  

Other features in that section include:

  • recollections from the performers and from the audience about their "first time" at the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering.
  • poems celebrating the Gathering

We also maintain an index of all of the invited performers to the National Cowboy Poetry Gathering, since its inception in 1985.  

 

www.cowboypoetry.com

 

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