CowboyPoetry.com    Cowboy Poetry and Music and More at the BAR-D Ranch

R. J. (DICK) MORTON
Colorado Springs, Colorado
About
Dick Morton


 

 


City Kid 

I'm just a  kid who grew up in the west
And ranching isn't  the thing I do best.

Now you might be thinking that I'm just a dude
And I never saw a cow horse being shoed.

I rode many horses in years that went by
There were some reasons and I'll tell you why.

When I joined the army, the 8th Cavalry.
We all rode horses on weekends you see.

I was sent to Japan and the horses were to.
You ask why the horses? I wondered that too.

Then I married a ranchers daughter for sure.
As far as I know that was  all right with her.

I know her father was pleased as could be,
He had a new hand who'd be working for free.

I soon learned the ropes, at least one thing or two
Like shoveling silage at minus two two.

I helped fix the fence which was lots of fun too,
But how to dig post holes I already knew.

Round up and branding were my special thing.
I ear marked the little calves ears in the ring.

I was a City Kid whose life did change,
When I had the chance to be out on the range.

© Dick Morton
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 


Cowboy Dream

When he was four the dream began
          when Santa left him boots, light tan,
A cowboy hat, shirt, jeans to wear
          with six shooter, holster, cuffs a pair. 

He went around the neighborhood
          Tellin’  friends he’d do good.
Cowboys help out those in trouble
          and turn the bad ones into rubble.

Tom Mix, Buck Jones Tex Ritter each his friend
          After Saturday movies he’d pretend
To ride and shoot and apprehend
          then go off into the sunset a good guy at the end.

That kid liked cowboyn’, but was there more?
          Only time would tell, it’s happened before.
Those silver screen cowboys instilled values
          imbedded in life’s avenues.

Did the cowboy dream ever go away?
          When the little boy became a man one day?
Life’s twists and turns caused him some strife.
          Would he ever get a taste of cowboy life?

Now education was the range that he rode.
          The lives he touched learned the cowboy code.
The cowboy dream and values held true
          the ones that he taught caught them too.

Those working years flew by and now are gone
          but does that cowboy dream live on?
The idols of his past remain eternally
          reciting cowboy poetry.

© 2015, Dick Morton
This poem may not be reprinted or reposted without the author's written permission.

 

 

 

 


 


  About R. J. (Dick) Morton:

Dick is a Colorado native whose grandparents settled in Colorado in the 1870s. He served in the 8th Cavalry during WW II and says, "We still had horses in my outfit and rode whenever we had the chance." After college he married a rancher's daughter (Jane Morton). His "ranch education" came on her dad's 14,000 acre cow/calf operation. He got "broke in" fixin' fence and windmills, shovelling silage, working cattle, roundup and branding.

By learning the classics, he passes on the "cowboy heritage" of the great early day poets. Among those are poems by S. Omar Barker, Bruce Kiskaddon, Sharlot Hall, Charles Badger Clark, Henry Herbert Knibbs, E. A. Brininstool, Buck Ramsey and several anonymous poets. Dick has been invited to perform at gatherings throughout Arizona, New Mexico, Utah, Washington, Wyoming and Colorado. He took home the championship buckle as a reciter at the 2005 National Cowboy Poetry Rodeo in Kanab, Utah.

His CD, Cowboy Classics, was recognized in Western Horseman magazine, April 2007, where the review states, "There is no doubt his cowboy training has allowed him to present the classic poems in an authentic form."

His recitation of Badger Clark's  A Cowboy's Prayer on that CD was selected for the first edition of The BAR-D Roundup from CowboyPoetry.com. Selected poems from Cowboy Classics have been heard on  Marvin O'Dell's Around the Campfire on Classic Heartland; Andy and Jim Nelson's Clear Out West (C. O. W.), Pinedale, Wyoming; KPOV, Calling All Cowboys, Bend, Oregon; Joe Baker's Backforty Bunkhouse program in Ruidoso, New Mexico; and on other Western radio shows.

 


photo by Lloyd Shelby
Dick and Jane Morton at Kanab, 2002


photo by Teddie Daley
Dick and Jane Morton at Prescott, 2001

Cowboy Classics III

Includes:

Trail Dust by S. Omar Barker
I'd Like to be in Texas by anonymous
Border Affair by Charles Badger Clark
Your Campfire by Bruce Kiskaddon
The Creak of the Leather by Bruce Kiskaddon
Shovelin' Ice Out of the Trough by Bruce Kiskaddon
Myself and I by Charles Badger Clark
Beyond the Range by Sharlot Hall
After the Fall Roundup by Bruce Kiskaddon
Outlaw's Funeral by S. Omar Barker
Zebra Dun by anonymous
The Rains by Charles Badger Clark
Cowboy Love Song by Gail I. Gardner
City Kid by Dick Morton

Find our announcement here. See Rick Huff's review here.

 

Cowboy Classics is available for $13 postpaid 

Order via e-mail to dickandjane2@earthlink.net or by mail to: 

Dick Morton
7961 E. Natal Ave.
Mesa, AZ 85209
(October through April)

or

12710 Abert Way
Colorado Springs, CO 80908 
(April-October)

Dick says, "Include your name, mailing address, phone number, check or money order. Orders will be filled 'post haste.'"

 


 

Cowboy Classics II

Includes:

Anthem by Buck Ramsey
A Cowboy's Christmas Prayer by S. Omar Barker
The Lost Partner by Charles Badger Clark
The Shallows of the Ford by Henry Herbert Knibbs
The Old Cowman by Charles Badger Clark
Bad Half Hour by Charles Badger Clark
Drouth Time by Sharlot Hall
The Walking Man by Henry Herbert Knibbs
My Enemy by Charles Badger Clark
Yep by Rod Nichols
No Title by anonymous
One Way of Proposin' by S. Omar Barker
Little Joe the Wrangler by Jack Thorp

Find our announcement here. See Rick Huff's review here.

 

Cowboy Classics is available for $13 postpaid 

Order via e-mail to dickandjane2@earthlink.net or by mail to: 

Dick Morton
7961 E. Natal Ave.
Mesa, AZ 85209
(October through April)

or

12710 Abert Way
Colorado Springs, CO 80908 
(April-October)

Dick says, "Include your name, mailing address, phone number, check or money order. Orders will be filled 'post haste.'"

 


 

Cowboy Classics

Includes:

Trail Dust by S. Omar Barker
Bunkhouse Christmas by S. Omar Barker
Cattleman's Prayer
  anonymous
Cowboy's Complaint by S. Omar Barker
Ghost Canyon Trail by Bruce Kiskaddon
Hunted Men by S. Omar Barker
Juanita by E. A. Brininstool
Line Camp Christmas by S. Omar Barker
So Long, Chinook! by Henry Herbert Knibbs
The Broncho Twister's Prayer by Bruce Kiskaddon
The Old Cow Pony by Bruce Kiskaddon
The Shallows of the Ford by Henry Herbert Knibbs
The Walking Man
by Henry Herbert Knibbs
Where the Ponies Come to Drink by Henry Herbert Knibbs
A Cowboy's Prayer by Charles Badger Clark

Background music recorded by Mark L. Gardner and Rex Rideout
Produced by Bob Luttrell for B & L Impact Media Productions

 

 
In the April, 2007 edition of Western Horseman, Associate Editor Kyle Partain calls Cowboy Classics a "must have for fans of the cowboy poetry genre."

 

Cowboy Classics is available for $15 postpaid 

Order via e-mail to dickandjane2@earthlink.net or by mail to: 

Dick Morton
7961 E. Natal Ave.
Mesa, AZ 85209
(October through April)

or

12710 Abert Way
Colorado Springs, CO 80908 
(April-October)

Dick says, "Include your name, mailing address, phone number, check or money order. Orders will be filled 'post haste.'"

 

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